Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-23-2013, 04:55 PM   #21
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,147
Well so far I am OK. We officially changed our new boat's name to Alaskan Sea-Duction this past weekend after of course de-naming her IAW the proper proceedures. I would not allow the chairs which had the old boat name on them back on the boat.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
1988 M/Y Camargue Yacht Fisher
Alaskan Sea-Duction
MMSI: 338131469
Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2013, 06:50 PM   #22
Guru
 
Steve's Avatar
 
City: Thibodaux, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gumbo
Vessel Model: 2003 Monk 36
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,607
I changed the name of my boat after an abreviated ceremony: a splash of good rum on the bow, a splash in the water, a splash for the Captain, and best wishes for safe and happy travels.
I can tell you if I had a boat named Nostra Signora, I would never dare to change it!
__________________

__________________
Steve W.
http://mvgumbo.blogspot.com/
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2013, 01:08 AM   #23
Veteran Member
 
sailtones's Avatar
 
City: Tivat
Country: Montenegro
Vessel Name: Nostra Signora
Vessel Model: Marine Trader CHB 34DC
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve View Post
I can tell you if I had a boat named Nostra Signora, I would never dare to change it!
No? Why? A serious or tongue in cheek comment?
__________________
Tony
sailtones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2013, 11:46 AM   #24
Guru
 
Steve's Avatar
 
City: Thibodaux, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gumbo
Vessel Model: 2003 Monk 36
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,607
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailtones View Post
No? Why? A serious or tongue in cheek comment?
tounge in cheek.
__________________
Steve W.
http://mvgumbo.blogspot.com/
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2013, 11:55 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Vashon_Trawler's Avatar
 
City: St. Petersburg, Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/V Sherpa
Vessel Model: 24' Vashon Diesel Cruiser
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 426
I kept our boat's name out of respect for the previous owner. My wife and I loved the story concerning how he came up with the name. He had used my trawler to haul supplies, ferry people, and guide friends' boats from the mainland to an island he owned. His girlfrend jokingly said that he was using the boat like a "Sherpa"... the name stuck and I kept it.

I believe it is bad juju to change a boat's name but then again I've come across some horrible boat names that are begging to be changed!
__________________
“Go small, go simple, go now”
― Larry Pardey, Cruising in Seraffyn
Vashon_Trawler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 05:15 AM   #26
Guru
 
City: Doha
Country: Qatar
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 663
I think one of the wonderful little indulgences that we allow ourselves as sailors is to pay homage to seafaring traditions, many of which have a history of thousands of years.

The one in particular that I learned about the hard way was changing the name of one of my earliest boats when I bought it. There was nothing really deficient in the original name, I was just a youngster and thought I knew better.

Although that boat took me thousands of miles and we survived 30ft seas together, honestly I had all sorts of bad juju over the several years that we were together.

I'm a non-superstitious person, except in this regard. Learned my lesson!
makobuilders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 08:43 AM   #27
Hospitality Officer
 
Andy G's Avatar
 
City: Pittwater
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Sarawana
Vessel Model: IG 36 Quad Cabin
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,557
Quote:
Originally Posted by makobuilders View Post
I'm a non-superstitious person, except in this regard. Learned my lesson!
That's like being a little bit dead.
Andy G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 10:41 AM   #28
Guru
 
City: somewhere
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,356
Our boat was named "Island Time" which we immediately changed to "Beach Bum". Removed anything.in the boat with that name except the galley clock.
__________________
Life is a Beach
beachbum29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2013, 10:44 AM   #29
Guru
 
City: somewhere
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,356
Oops, forgot the image.

Click image for larger version

Name:	ForumRunner_20131025_104326.jpg
Views:	100
Size:	30.4 KB
ID:	24077
__________________
Life is a Beach
beachbum29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2014, 11:12 PM   #30
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,447
I have decided to change the name of the boat, as I was inspired by this one:
Attached Images
 
__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
Xsbank is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 12:31 AM   #31
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,142
The rest of the story....

Wifey B:

Well, as a former teacher I do feel an obligation to educate on this subject. While Neptune gets a lot of credit, his wonderful wife get's overlooked. Salacia is the personification of the calm and sunlit sea. She is a beautiful nymph who was a virgin before marriage to Neptune (ok, this is mythology so accept that). He sent a dolphin to persuade her to marry him and when she said yes he awarded the dolphin a place in the heavens, as the constellation Delphinus.

So, now while honoring Neptune may benefit, the true way is by honoring Salacia. But then most are not aware of that tradition or ceremony. While she does love Champagne, there's something she loves much more. So to honor her and protect the ship forever, making it a place of love, pleasure and much happiness for all times, love must be made in all areas of the ship, both inside and on each deck. This must be done within the first month after commissioning or recommissioning of the ship. Champagne may accompany but by following this ceremony the ship will always be a place of great love in your life. It may even lead to more boats in the form of dinghies or tenders.

Hope this helps bringing love and happiness to each of your boats. In fact, just this story makes me think we need to rechristen our boat now. And since my hubby is right here beside me, guess no time like now. Yes, even a chartered boat like we're on today should be protected by properly honoring Salacia and Neptune. I'm sure you all know that if you keep Salacia happy, then Neptune will be as well.

Hope this wasn't too Salacious for anyone....hehe.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 02:15 AM   #32
Guru
 
bligh's Avatar
 
City: Santa Cruz, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Frisky
Vessel Model: 99 Nordic Tug
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,096
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
I have decided to change the name of the boat, as I was inspired by this one:
That's a good one!
bligh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 07:22 AM   #33
TF Site Team
 
Pack Mule's Avatar
 
City: Paris,TN
Country: USA
Vessel Name: William
Vessel Model: Outer reef 32
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,501
Hmmm I may not change the name on ours just yet . I've had enough bad juju this past week .
Pack Mule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 08:02 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
jimbob's Avatar
 
City: Tennessee River
Country: united states
Vessel Name: SEEKER
Vessel Model: Trans Pac Eagle 32
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 141
Never changed the name of a boat but seems as all you've done to convert this one to one of your own, following all guidelines set forth neptune would be happy. Have read 5 ways to appeases neptune with all requiring lots of rum and no pee ? Have rum will travel
jimbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 08:30 AM   #35
Hospitality Officer
 
Andy G's Avatar
 
City: Pittwater
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Sarawana
Vessel Model: IG 36 Quad Cabin
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pack Mule View Post
Hmmm I may not change the name on ours just yet . I've had enough bad juju this past week .
Maybe a bit of gentle Salacia is just what you need after that rough week.
Andy G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 08:30 AM   #36
Guru
 
Hendo78's Avatar
 
City: Perth
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: M/V SOLSTICE
Vessel Model: Hendo "Special"
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,275
Whether you are renaming an old boat or christening a new one, accomplishing the ritual properly helps ensure you receive the favor of the gods. The results of ignoring this warning have been cited as the contributing factor in many marine related accidents from boats sinking to spilling your drink.

You are probably asking, what is the proper way to perform the ceremony? Not so fast, to truly be a competent seafaring
Old Salt you need to be well versed in the history and lore involved in such a prestigious undertaking.

We will begin by providing a glimpse into the past and attempt to provide an understanding of how this process did or may have evolved. As with anything involving history, you reach a point where only assumptions can be made. In other words, you can base a theory off of factual knowledge, likely events and even lies. Of course as seasoned mariners we never tell lies, we only tell loosely wound Tales!


History
From the earliest points in history, travel by water is evidenced by remnants of dug out canoes and crude drawings of rafts or other water borne vessels on cave walls. We can only surmise how this beneficial form of travel was discovered. Did Grog the caveman discover this by accident? Picture this, in the early-morning hours Grog is going out for his morning ritual. He takes his usual route that crosses a swift moving river by walking an old log. As he begins to cross the log breaks sending both into the river. To Grog's dismay, he realizes he cannot swim and frantically grabs the floating log. Eureka, Grog becomes the first mariner!

The truth is the exact moment waterborne travel was discovered cannot be pinpointed; it could have started innocently enough. We do know the real catalyst that allowed this form of transportation to develop into what we see today was trade. It started with simple rafts and canoes eventually evolving into more advanced vessels that were capable of not only traveling rivers, but oceans as well. Thank goodness for that or we would never get our Nikes!

Until this point in time, man had existed solely on land and his knowledge of the sea was limited to what he could observe from the shore, so the sea was an unknown. One can only imagine the terror encountered during these initial voyages as the sailors pitted their crude craft against the mighty power of the sea. Even today with our vast knowledge a rough sea regularly makes folks religious or at least introduces them to the power of chumming.

Religion as well as superstition were important aspects in the daily lives of the earlier cultures. These beliefs were not lost on those that risked their lives traveling the seas. The Egyptians, Greeks and Romans were among the first cultures to call on their gods to protect their sailors and in some cases elaborate ceremonies were performed while asking for these blessings. Many believe the first example of a blessing or christening is described by the Assyrian Flood Tablets. Part of the tablet XI deals with the building of the Ark and its dedication as described in this exerpt from the 1919 publication The Rudder, "The Why and Wherefore of the Christening of Ships" by Robert G. Skerrett:


And on the ground I will make the ship which thou com mandest
On the fifth day two sides were raised
In its enclosure fourteen ribs
Also fourteen they number above I placed its roof and enclosed it
Sixthly I made it firm seventhly I divided its passages
Eighthly its interior I examined
Openings to the water I stopped
searched for cracks and the wanting parts I fixed
Three sari of bitumen I poured over the outside
Three sari of bitumen I poured over the interior
Three sari of men bearers who carried chests on their heads
I kept a saros of chests for my people to eat
Two sari of chests I divided among the boatmen
To the gods I caused oxen to be sacrificed


These early encounters of man versus the seas indicate that the ritual provided a sense of security and humble acknowledgement of a higher power. Excerpts from the logs of old ships indicate that as mariners became more enlightened the ritual changed as each culture saw fit to adapt it to their unique situation.

As the ritual evolved, sacrificing oxen shifted to sacrificing virgins and even this was replaced with sacrificing some form of liquid spirits as the ceremonies shifted from primarily a religious activity into more of a social event. Although the ritual has changed, religion and superstition still remain an important part of the today's ceremonies as priests or other clergy are often called upon to bestow a blessing upon the vessel.

Before we get into the finer details of the ritual, let's explore the background of the figures involved.

Poseidon
In Greek mythology, Poseidon was the Olympian God of the Mediterranean Sea. His palace was in the depths of the sea where he kept his horses with brazen hooves and golden manes. These horses would pull Poseidon across the sea in a chariot where he could gather clouds and call forth storms. For those he deemed worthy, he could calm the seas and grant a successful passage. Since the seas covered the majority of the Earth, Poseidon was considered the highest of all Gods.


Neptune
In Roman mythology, Neptune is the counterpart to Poseidon. However, Neptune was initially associated with inland waters such as rivers and streams and only in later years was he recognized as the ruler of the seas. Neptune and Poseidon are regularly mistaken as the same character even though they have slightly different origins. Neptune is most often the entity referred to in the naming ceremonies and will be reflected here.


Aeolus (pronounced EE-oh-lus)
In Greek mythology, Aeolus was the ruler of all winds which he could control at will and was also known as the "storm god." As the ruler of all winds, Aeolus was in command of Boreas, god of the north wind, Eurus, god of the east wind, Notus, god of the south wind and finally Zephyrus, god of the west wind. The exact lineage and history of Aeolus is unclear even today with conflicting accounts. It is said that Aeolus provided favorable winds for those that he deemed worthy and called forth unsuitable winds for his foes.


It was a common superstition among sailors that renaming a boat would condemn her to an early visit to the deep. This was the equivalent of removing her soul. However, as times have changed it has been found acceptable to accomplish this task as long as a strict regimen was followed that would appease the Gods.

There are actually two ceremonies and they can be as formal as you desire. They commonly range from a few spoken words to something a bit more elaborate complete with costumes and props. For those that truly love boating it is not uncommon for the ceremony to become a more involved affair with family, friends and dock-mates participating. So above all make it a fun event that the family will remember.

You will find various examples of the renaming ritual on the internet each with its own flavor, however they all follow a common sequence of events.

1. Removal of Previous Identity.
2. De-naming Ceremony.
3. Re-naming Ceremony.


Removal of Identity
According to legend, every vessel is recorded in the Ledger of the Deep by Neptune. Should Neptune find a vessel plying the waters that is not properly listed in his ledger, they shall suffer his wrath, after all this is his home.

Therefore, this is perhaps the most critical step in the ritual to ensure you start off on good terms. All items bearing the old name must be removed from the vessel; this includes logbooks, paperwork, key-chains, and other items. It is easy to overlook something so take your time and garner the help of others to ensure this is done properly. This may require the use of white out or a black marker for the logbook if you plan on keeping the former one. Poseidon will not purge the old name from his records as long as any evidence of it remains so be diligent.

Furthermore, during this process do not mention the new name or place any items bearing the new name on the boat. This is considered very offensive and being presumptuous to assume Neptune will grant your request before you have even asked.

Once all evidence of the old name is removed, you will need to secure several bottles of wine and a small metal tag or ingot. The amount of wine will be determined by the amount of guests that will participate in the ceremony but at the very least you will need three bottles. One bottle will be sacrificed to the gods during the denaming ceremony and two for the renaming ceremony. On the small metal tag (ingot), you will write the boat's old name with a water-soluble pen. This tag (ingot) will be part of the denaming ceremony. Many people will substitute champagne for wine during the ceremony; however, wine is embedded much deeper in the history of vessels and the sea than champagne.


De-naming Ceremony

Now is the time to round up all of your guests to take part in this momentous occasion. It is a good idea to explain the importance of these ceremonies and ask that the guests remain quiet to show their respect and pay homage until both ceremonies are complete. Only your immediate family should be onboard and allowed to perform the ceremony, your guests should observe the proceedings from the dock or a nearby boat. The denaming ceremony's purpose is a plea to Neptune to remove all traces of the old vessel's name from the Ledger of the Deep.

Now with your ingot and bottle of wine proceed to the bow of the boat and you are ready to begin.


Oh mighty and great ruler of the seas and oceans, to whom all ships and we who venture upon your vast domain are required to pay homage, implore you in your graciousness to expunge for all time from your records and recollection the name (insert the old name of your vessel) which has ceased to be an entity in your kingdom. As proof thereof, we submit this ingot bearing her name to be corrupted through your powers and forever be purged from the sea. (the metal tag is dropped from the bow of the boat into the sea.)

In grateful acknowledgment of your munificence and dispensation, we offer these libations to your majesties and your court. (open the wine and pour at least half the bottle into the sea beginning in the east and moving to the west, the remaining wine can be shared after the ceremony)



At this point, it is absolutely imperative that the boat's old name never be spoken again in the presence of the vessel. She is clean and nameless with homage paid to Neptune. In most cases, you should immediately proceed to the naming ceremony since your vessel is now unknown and unprotected.

Additionally, do not bring any items bearing the new name on board the vessel, nor mention the new name in the presence of the vessel until the naming ceremony is completed. If the new name must be applied to the transom prior to the ceremony, it must remain covered and hidden from view until the end of the ceremony.


Naming Ceremony
The naming ceremony consists of two parts, first a plea to Neptune to record the new vessel name in the Ledger of the Deep, then the second part pays homage to the gods of the wind.

Now with a fresh bottle of wine proceed to the bow of the boat and prepare to begin.

Oh mighty and great ruler of the seas and oceans, to whom all ships and we who venture upon your vast domain are required to pay homage, implore you in your graciousness to take unto your records and recollection this worthy vessel hereafter and for all time known as (new vessel name), guarding her with your mighty arm and trident and ensuring her of safe and rapid passage throughout her journeys within your realm.


In appreciation of your munificence, dispensation and in honor of your greatness, we offer these libations to your majesty and your court. (open the bottle of wine, pour one glass for the Captain and one glass for the First Mate but don't drink yet, now pour the remainder of the bottle into the sea from West to East, then drink your wine.)

For this part you will need another bottle of wine and a small glass.


Oh mighty rulers of the winds, through whose power our frail vessels traverse the wild and faceless deep, we implore you to grant this worthy vessel (boat’s new name) the benefits and pleasures of your bounty, ensuring us of your gentle ministration according to our needs.

(Facing north, pour wine into the glass and fling to the North as you intone.)
Great Boreas, exalted ruler of the North Wind, grant us permission to use your mighty powers in the pursuit of our lawful endeavors, ever sparing us the overwhelming scourge of your frigid breath.

(Facing west, repeat and fling to the West.)
Great Zephyrus, exalted ruler of the West Wind, grant us permission to use your mighty powers in the pursuit of our lawful endeavors, ever sparing us the overwhelming scourge of your wild breath.

(Facing east, repeat and fling to the East.)
Great Eurus, exalted ruler of the East Wind, grant us permission to use your mighty powers in the pursuit of our lawful endeavors, ever sparing us the overwhelming scourge of your mighty breath.

(Facing south, repeat and fling to the South.)
Great Notus, exalted ruler of the South Wind, grant us permission to use your mighty powers in the pursuit of our lawful endeavors, ever sparing us the overwhelming scourge of your scalding breath.

And to the greatest of all, mighty Aeolus guardian of all winds and all that blows before them, we ask your favor and kindness for fair winds and smooth seas in our endeavors as we humbly pass through your kingdom
.

If the new name has been affixed to the transom, it should be unveiled at this time. If it has not been affixed bring an object aboard bearing the new name to complete the ceremony. Of course at this point applause and cheers should abound as your vessel now has her new identity and everyone can join the celebration.

Be sure and take lots of photos and record the event along with all the details in the vessel's logbook. Now you can share a sigh of relief and rest assured that your vessel is assured a safe journeys.
Sent from iPad using Trawler App
__________________
***I use and recommend ANCHOR RIGHT Anchors***
Hendo78 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 08:50 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
City: Rockford, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Du NORD
Vessel Model: Albin-25
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 177
We've changed the name of our Albin-25 twice, and the name of

our prior Yawl three times. No big deal. The name changes occured early in our stewardship.
Moby Nick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 09:59 AM   #38
Guru
 
hollywood8118's Avatar
 
City: Port Townsend Washington
Country: USA
Vessel Name: " OTTER "
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander Europa 40
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,482
I guess it all depends if you are superstitious or not..

Personally I have renamed every one of our boats without incident.

I have always thought the renaming ceremony a load of crap.

To each their own.. I guess you can make a party of it and I am always in favor of a party.

HOLLYWOOD
hollywood8118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 10:16 AM   #39
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollywood8118 View Post
I guess it all depends if you are superstitious or not..

Personally I have renamed every one of our boats without incident.

I have always thought the renaming ceremony a load of crap.

To each their own.. I guess you can make a party of it and I am always in favor of a party.

HOLLYWOOD
This.
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2014, 10:20 AM   #40
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,142
Wifey B to Hendo:

You're falling victim to the male dominated stories of the years, attached to the sea. In Greek Mythology they minimized the female as well and Salacia's equivalent was Amphitrite, who was just a consort of Poseidon. But in Roman Mythology, Neptune fell so madly in love with Salacia.

Salacia brings out the best in Neptune including his virility. I'm just telling you that while history may have diminished her role, she and Neptune are like most couples. If you want him to remain calm and pleased with you, to be peaceful and happy, then Salacia is the real key to that. She is the one who knows how to sooth him, how to show him love.

In fact, while I can't verify this, I do believe she's the very reason the drink in the christening became Champagne rather than a Whiskey or other type drink. Think about this. Night out with the boys, what would Neptune have ordered? But Champagne for a night in with his lady. While sailors have often thought they could somehow manage or control Neptune, the one who truly has the power to do so is Salacia. So be kind to her and she'll be kind to you and keep Neptune happy, peaceful and serene.

Just Saturday night my husband and I went to an art gallery, a fine dinner, the Opera, enjoyed plenty of champagne and then returned to the boat and honored Salacia for hours while continuing to sip champagne. Yesterday then the seas were beyond calm, they were docile. Peaceful, content seas showing Salacia was obviously pleased and in turn Neptune was made very happy as well.

I know to many of you this is an entirely new revelation. I'm just saying practice what I've indicated. If you haven't honored Salacia on your boat, then do so soon, and your seas will lie peaceful and calm.
__________________

BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
name change, neptune

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012