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Old 08-08-2012, 02:51 PM   #101
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I bought my trawler with the primary consideration of the reliability and longetivity of the motors. I hope to get 15 - 20 years out of these with preventative maintenance schedule. I don't know how well they were treated the first 27 years but the Oil Analysis was favorable.
Time will tell.
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Old 08-08-2012, 02:56 PM   #102
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Q: Where are the fastest tidal currents?

Below is a list of the 50 locations in North America with the fastest tidal currents.

I guess none of the NOAA people ever made it to Nakwakto Rapids (Tremble Island at the mouth of Seymour Inlet) the current there runs around 8 knots on a normal ebb and a few times a year goes up to 16.

I used to go through there with a tug and barge and even near slack it was awesome. It made Seymour Narrows look mild and Hole in the Wall was pretty tame. Of course the tug captain on that run was probably one of the best on that coast and made most passages look easy.
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Old 08-08-2012, 03:12 PM   #103
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there have been plenty of instances, even in waters where tow services are less than an hour away, where boats have been carried into rocks, onto a reef, or up against the shore within a very short time after power was lost.

Guess they don't carry an anchor anymore?

FF
When you have water that can be several hundred feet deep almost right up to the shoreline deploying the anchor is no guarantee you'll stay off the rocks. It's not like that everywhere up here, of course, but in the two cases I cited above it was.
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Old 08-08-2012, 03:26 PM   #104
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I guess none of the NOAA people ever made it to Nakwakto Rapids (Tremble Island at the mouth of Seymour Inlet) the current there runs around 8 knots on a normal ebb and a few times a year goes up to 16.

I used to go through there with a tug and barge and even near slack it was awesome. It made Seymour Narrows look mild and Hole in the Wall was pretty tame. Of course the tug captain on that run was probably one of the best on that coast and made most passages look easy.
I'm sure there are a few out there that NOAA missed...

But the reality is if conditions exist that would exceed the capabilities of you or the boat at ANY time...don't go there...doesn't mean go boat there...just don't be there at the wrong time if it is possible.

Where I boat, lots of boaters boat according to the strength of the tidal currents. In many marinas, several knots are the norm making single engine ops (either starting that way or a twin with one down) pretty iffy for most boaters.
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Old 08-08-2012, 05:14 PM   #105
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Other than transiting the stronger rapids, narrows, and passes, most of the boaters I know don't tailor their cruising to the tides an currents. When cruising through the islands in particular, depending on one's destination it's common to be going with the current on one leg, against it n the next, across it on the next, and so on.

It's always nice when we can get a two or thee knot push from the current but we don't alter our schedule if we don't. For example on this last trip to Anacortes we were getting a 2 knot push on the way down, but since we came home at about the same time three days later we bucked a 1.5 to 2 knot current on the way back. Waiting for a more favorable current was not an option that day.

Add to this the fact that slack current can sometimes last only 15 minutes or so, and boaters here are dealing with a current pretty much all the time. So if one has to wait for a tow boat to arrive, a lot can happen in a half hour. From what we hear on the radio most assistance boats are looking at 30 minutes to an hour to reach the boats that need help and the farther up the coast you go the longer those times will be. Of course there are often other boats nearby that can offer assistance quicker than the commercial services can get there. But other boats start getting few and far between as you go north or boat in the fall, winter, and spring.

So a boater is as likely to be left to their own resources in the event of a power or steerage loss as they are to be in range of assistance. And the currents don't wait if your breakdown puts you in danger of going into the rocks within a short time of the breakdown.

This scenario is not common, engine and transmission reliability being what it is, but it's a situation that's always out there.
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Old 08-08-2012, 08:35 PM   #106
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Sometimes more makes you look stupid:



I suspect the pic was doctored, but still.
Is the fuel burn on a boat with 8 200hp engines equal to a boat with 4 400hp engines? I have always wondered about that.

Also, if you are docking an 8 engine boat and lose power in one engine, how do you compensate for the loss?
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:16 PM   #107
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Also, if you are docking an 8 engine boat and lose power in one engine, how do you compensate for the loss?
More fundamentally, how do you know one of the eight engines has quit?
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Old 08-08-2012, 10:15 PM   #108
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More fundamentally, how do you know one of the eight engines has quit?
the handling will get all quirky?

You have probably heard the story of the B-52 pilot reporting that he was landing with one engine out. A near by F-15 pilot said, "gee, it must be tough landing with only 7 engines".
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Old 08-08-2012, 10:34 PM   #109
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the handling will get all quirky?
People laugh and point?
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Old 08-09-2012, 08:00 AM   #110
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Somewhere on TF is a thread that talks about prop walk. I suppose with that many engines it's a prop dance? Would that be a line dance since they're all in a row?
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Old 08-09-2012, 06:36 PM   #111
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I wonder if they shut down 7 of them and practice docking with only one!?

Also wonder if 2000HP is really necessary or if they were just succumbing to current more is better trend in the blow-up market?

The story on these a while back is that they were drug runner specials.
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Old 08-09-2012, 07:56 PM   #112
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They rarely got a chance to practice anything.

Photo of a High Speed Boat Used to Smuggle Drugs-Truth!
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Old 08-09-2012, 08:51 PM   #113
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according to the full article quite a few were built and sold around Europe. They never do admit how many are out there! 900 liters/hour makes my trawler look like its "making" fuel!

Boatbuilding firm supplied 'uncatchable' boats to smugglers, court hears | Mail Online
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Old 08-10-2012, 08:28 AM   #114
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That's what I was wondering. What's the fuel burn rate? And how much fuel can you really carry on there? The hull below decks must be one huge fuel tank.
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Old 08-10-2012, 02:26 PM   #115
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The English Channel is not that wide--- 20 miles or so at some points--- and at the speed these boats go the engines only need to run at full power for perhaps thirty minutes.
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