View Poll Results: Captains Test
A. 2 7.41%
B. 17 62.96%
C. 5 18.52%
D. 3 11.11%
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:40 PM   #1
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Captains Test

In a narrow channel, You are underway on vessel A and desire to overtake vessel B.
after you sound two short blasts on your whistle, vessel B sounds five short and rapid blasts on the whistle. You should:

A. pass with caution on the port side of vessel B

B. Hold your relative position, and then sound another signal after the situation has stabilized

C. answer the five short blast signal then stop your vessel until the other vessel initiates a signal

D. Slow or stop and expect radical maneuvers from B
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Old 02-04-2013, 04:05 PM   #2
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Greetings,
Gadzooks Mr. SD. I'm definitely going to stay out of those narrow channels. OK, not A for sure. B?...What situation? Can the other boat see something you can't or does she just not want to be passed? C?...By answering with 5 blasts that would suggest I knew what the "situation" was wouldn't it? D?...Radical maneuvers? How radical can you get in a narrow channel? I would attempt to make radio contact and find out what was going on or failing that I guess D. That seems to be my answer for everything. Stop and assess.
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Old 02-04-2013, 04:20 PM   #3
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Two long blasts and Two short blasts indicate you intend to pass in a narrow channel or fairway in sight. On the port side.
under international rules.

Two short blasts in a narrow channel or fairway for inland in sight. Is intent to overtake on your port.

5 Blasts is Danger. Pretty much everywhere.

Stop stay where you are see what happens first is what I would do
then start over. Sound the two short blasts. and try again.

Sounds usually work the radio doesn't always.

SD
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Old 02-04-2013, 04:22 PM   #4
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Greetings,
Complicated...
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Old 02-04-2013, 07:50 PM   #5
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I'd do B. Then attempt to contact the other boat.
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Old 02-04-2013, 08:44 PM   #6
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B is not the best answer but the other 3 are out of the question.
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Old 02-04-2013, 08:55 PM   #7
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I agree 100% Mark. you do anything and everything to make contact.

It's all about being safe.

The more information you have the better the decisions you will make.

There can often be two answers to some of these questions. Like this one.

The correct answer is B.

Stop. Stay where you are. Wait a bit, till things calm down. Then start from scratch.

Answer D reads much the same. Or the happinings of a real time event.

If you get the 5 short danger signal. You are going to stop and see what is happing and expect anything to happen. including radical moves from the other vessel.

PREPARE TO TAKE EVASIVE ACTIONS.

But that is not the USCG answer.

The answer is B.
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Old 02-04-2013, 09:02 PM   #8
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Actually B doesn't say stop...it says hold your relative position to the other vessel...that's why B is the best answer because the USCG/Colregs will almost NEVER require a vessel to come to a stop.
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Old 02-04-2013, 09:12 PM   #9
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Excellent.
As, great point to remember.

I am beginning to understand the psychology of the USCG Captains test
When you think about it it dose make sense. But geewhizz the wording of some of these questions. Folks will see as we go along for as long as this lasts any way.

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Old 02-05-2013, 07:20 AM   #10
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That's one of the main reasons the schools have made it easier to pass these tests...it's not so much that they teach the test...it's that they teach to make the tests easier by looking for key words/thinking....etc...

A good example was the question about heading out the Chesapeake Bay and asking whether you would see
a. red aids on your right
b. green aids on your left
c. red/white near the middle
d. none of the above

(may not be exact but close)

Probably one of the more chickenshi* questions as all 3 are true but they force you to think about the rules that say stay as far right as you can...which means as wide as the Chesapeake is...you'll probably only see the reds....in my book REALLY "chickenshi*" but still a question.

When I taught...there were only a couple of questions where I knew the test question had the wrong answer or 2 answers that were perfectly acceptable...so I made sure the students had a fair chance if they got them wrong and it meant the difference between passing and failing.
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Old 02-05-2013, 10:41 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
That's one of the main reasons the schools have made it easier to pass these tests...it's not so much that they teach the test...it's that they teach to make the tests easier by looking for key words/thinking....etc...

A good example was the question about heading out the Chesapeake Bay and asking whether you would see
a. red aids on your right
b. green aids on your left
c. red/white near the middle
d. none of the above

(may not be exact but close)

Probably one of the more chickenshi* questions as all 3 are true but they force you to think about the rules that say stay as far right as you can...which means as wide as the Chesapeake is...you'll probably only see the reds....in my book REALLY "chickenshi*" but still a question.

When I taught...there were only a couple of questions where I knew the test question had the wrong answer or 2 answers that were perfectly acceptable...so I made sure the students had a fair chance if they got them wrong and it meant the difference between passing and failing.
I'm confused. Assuming out means leaving, isn't C the only correct answer?
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Old 02-05-2013, 10:47 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vyndance View Post
I'm confused. Assuming out means leaving, isn't C the only correct answer?
Good catch..... I meant the opposite on red/green...still going south on the ICW so I've had red on my right for 2 months now...

The point of my example for those that take the Captains course is that the questions can involve a 2 separate requirements/rules assumption to come up with the "best"/only USCG answer.
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Old 02-05-2013, 12:44 PM   #13
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Quote:
Two short blasts in a narrow channel or fairway for inland in sight. Is intent to overtake on your port.
By "your" you do mean the other vessel I hope. The whistles signify the side of the over taking vessel . 90% of the recreational boats out there have no idea what the signals mean, they think you are just honking at them. But if they don't respond to VHF and you give them a horn signal, at least you've done everything you can. Though actually my wife got on the loud hailer once in frustration. It worked, the guy pulled over a little and slowed down.
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