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Old 03-10-2016, 11:40 PM   #21
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Reminds me of one time in the sixties, sitting on a checkerboard tile floor and, um, aw never mind, I forget now.
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Old 03-11-2016, 09:37 AM   #22
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Good point, but the tile pattern is too large in too small a space for that to be an issue.
I don't know, the only time I became "land sick" after a multi day offshore trip was when I walked into a restaurant with a checker board pattern like that.

Had to grab on to the backs of chairs on my way out to steady myself. Didn't even have a chance to get a drink.
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Old 03-11-2016, 09:51 AM   #23
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I don't know, the only time I became "land sick" after a multi day offshore trip was when I walked into a restaurant with a checker board pattern like that.

Had to grab on to the backs of chairs on my way out to steady myself. Didn't even have a chance to get a drink.
Floor tiles or lack of drink?

The hair removal place helps with that too...one stop shopping...
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Old 03-11-2016, 09:57 AM   #24
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The hair removal place helps with that too...
OH myeee gaaawd!! Baaad, baaad visual.
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Old 03-11-2016, 03:05 PM   #25
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When I acquired my boat I spent 3 days with an instructor, delivery skipper in Bellingham. When we first talked he advised me that he would not be touching the wheel at ANY time. He was great and very patient as he had my son, age 14, at the time take the wheel and also study charts. It was a great experience and if you are going to pay someone get the most from it.

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Old 03-11-2016, 04:52 PM   #26
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When I acquired my boat I spent 3 days with an instructor, delivery skipper in Bellingham. When we first talked he advised me that he would not be touching the wheel at ANY time. He was great and very patient as he had my son, age 14, at the time take the wheel and also study charts. It was a great experience and if you are going to pay someone get the most from it.

Glen
If that included docking practice...was he willing to let you smash up your boat or others?


He might be good.....but nobody is good enough to gamble talking someone new to them though anything....when I said taking the wheel should be a last resort...it sometimes gets there.


Sounds weird as any hands on training usually involves a point where the instructor may take over the controls....in cars, airplanes and boats...an boats usually don't have a separate set of controls so the training skipper has to be extra alert at critical times.
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Old 03-11-2016, 10:57 PM   #27
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If that included docking practice...was he willing to let you smash up your boat or others?


He might be good.....but nobody is good enough to gamble talking someone new to them though anything....when I said taking the wheel should be a last resort...it sometimes gets there.


Sounds weird as any hands on training usually involves a point where the instructor may take over the controls....in cars, airplanes and boats...an boats usually don't have a separate set of controls so the training skipper has to be extra alert at critical times.
+1 Weird.

Without touching the controls how would you know how the boat handles? There could be something wrong with the steeering or controls that I new owner might not recognize.
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Old 03-12-2016, 06:53 AM   #28
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+1 Weird.

Without touching the controls how would you know how the boat handles? There could be something wrong with the steeering or controls that I new owner might not recognize.
Sometimes in tough situations...I would have to dock the boat a half dozen times to see what can/can't be done and to have more than one way to suggest to a skipper having problems.


Tough call. It is called "hands on training" so backing off is necessary but I have seen even small dock rashes keep boats tied up for years until sold because the captain and crew were fearful of damaging their boat or others. I was more scared as an instructor helo pilot due to errors, but feel like more of a therapist when teaching boat handling.
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Old 03-12-2016, 10:29 AM   #29
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I have been interested in this thread. Assuming a satisfactory survey, I am going to have to learn how to handle a single engine power boat with a bow and stern thruster in about a month. While "concerned" would be too strong a word, I have been thinking about the transition from a sailboat to a power boat. Roughly the same length, both with single engine, but the power boat will be heavier and have a smaller rudder. Growing up with sail boats, I have a pretty innate sense of how a sailboat will spin around its fin keel.

So, any suggestions? How many think that it would be worth the time and expense to hire an instructor for an afternoon? I am inclined to think it would be good, not so much for me as for my wife (ie she doesn't have to learn from me or worry about my learning curve).
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Old 03-12-2016, 11:05 AM   #30
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I certainly can't hurt. I would spend a couple of days with someone who is very good with single screw boats and never use the thrusters.

Then another 15 minutes practicing with the thrusters.
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Old 03-12-2016, 02:27 PM   #31
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I have been interested in this thread. Assuming a satisfactory survey, I am going to have to learn how to handle a single engine power boat with a bow and stern thruster in about a month. While "concerned" would be too strong a word, I have been thinking about the transition from a sailboat to a power boat. Roughly the same length, both with single engine, but the power boat will be heavier and have a smaller rudder. Growing up with sail boats, I have a pretty innate sense of how a sailboat will spin around its fin keel.

So, any suggestions? How many think that it would be worth the time and expense to hire an instructor for an afternoon? I am inclined to think it would be good, not so much for me as for my wife (ie she doesn't have to learn from me or worry about my learning curve).
If you buy a single engine boat that is trawler like with bow and stern thrusters...hard to say.

If you are a good operator (boats, cars, riding lawnmowers, etc) you may not need much help. Especially if a quick learner.

You could go out on your own on benign days and practice NOT using the thrusters just like a sailboat (some trawlers have pretty good sized rudders so response is similar but less than the average sailboat in my experiences.

If thinks don't fo exactly as planned..then get on the thrusters and correct....with both bow and stern thrusters...if you have years experience driving sailboats under some demanding conditions..my guess is you will be fine (as long as your thrusters can save you like a teaching captain could)...you will pick it up would be my bet.

But like Capt Bill said...can't hurt ....especially for your wife. though I still think in a half dozen trips you could be adequate and your wife comfortable. If you have never used thrusters before it is like someone with only one arm getting a second one.
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Old 03-12-2016, 02:30 PM   #32
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So, any suggestions? How many think that it would be worth the time and expense to hire an instructor for an afternoon? I am inclined to think it would be good, not so much for me as for my wife (ie she doesn't have to learn from me or worry about my learning curve).
Before going through the expense of hiring a captain for an instructor, you might want to check out if the PO or the broker will give you a few hours of instruction.
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Old 03-12-2016, 02:31 PM   #33
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The instructor (skipper) I had started with he and I going through the chain locker and every foot of the boat and ALL its equipment to the rudder controls in the lazarette. He instructed us on prop walk and the specifics of my engine and genset and use of throttle and clutch and had us do 360's in the fairways , dock and anchor in the San Juans and hard chart reading and navigation. I guess I was lucky getting him and his advice has stood me well and he never touched the wheel. I think he had a talent for instructing. He also taught heavy weather sailing in San Francisco and he and his family lived aboard, I think, a Lord Nelson tug at the time.
We practiced without the thruster though he did instruct on using it properly w/o throwing the breaker.
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Old 03-12-2016, 02:51 PM   #34
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Fortunately there are many good instructional captains out there... also fortunately there are many good operational captains out there... unfortunately, as been said one is not necessarily the other. It may take digging as getting your moneys worth of instruction is important but in most boating areas you will find a good instructional captain with some checking.

Also unfortunately there are some USCG licensed captains that are good at neither for a lot of reasons....beware of them at all costs.
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