Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-09-2016, 12:07 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: Mission Viejo
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 70
California newbies - PNW or bust.

Greetings to all!
The decision's been made a few weeks age. After 5+ decades of land living, we have agreed to spend the next one as liveaboard creatures in the Pacific North West. Why the PNW?
Simple. After visiting more than 60 countries and living in 6 of them, we agree that the archipelagos and fjords between Orcas and Broughton islands are the most beautiful places on the planet, as we know it.
So, between now and next spring/summer we are filling up the schedule to:
1. Choose and buy a suitable trawler: 44'-52' CPMY, aft cabin, twin diesels capable of cruising at 10+ knots.
Once the boat is chosen, offer is made and accepted, financing/transport arranged, surveys all done satisfactorily and marina slip secured, it will still take us a few more months before we can move in. Her work contract and our business managing need completion and arrangements.
2. Sell, Gift, Donate or Trash most of our earthly possessions. It's amazing the amount of useless crap one accumulates when living in a house.
3. Take as many courses as possible on marine mechnical/electrical systems, diesel engines, navigation and maintenance. As well as read, copy and print forum posts with advice for future reference.

We'll be opening new threads asking a gazillion questions about things to learn. Our first questions is this:
We're looking at boats as described above all over the country and we find the east coast has a larger selection and at better initial asking prices. Does anyone know what if land transportation is possible and what the overall cost could be from FL to WA?
Shipping a yacht onboard across the Panama canal is cost prohibitive
Thank you all in advance!
Gustavo & Kelly
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
After many years of deep thinking, I have come to the conclusions that I am a nobody, and that nobody is perfect.....Does that make me perfect? I better stop thinking so much.
GANDK2PNW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 01:35 PM   #2
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 12,062
Welcome aboard! Sounds like a great adventure.
__________________

FlyWright is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 03:01 PM   #3
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 16,521
I'd be careful about saying the East Coast has a better selection and better prices. While it does in total, that doesn't necessarily translate into more or lower priced boats for the PNW. There is a lot of difference in the boats you'll see in the PNW and those on the East Coast, especially those in Florida.

As to shipping across country, it obviously depends a lot on the boat, will a flybridge need removing, what kind of permit, what route can be used, pilot vehicles. $15,000 may well be an average but many above and below.

As to shipping on a vessel, yes, it's expensive, but doesn't it's affordability really depend on how much you saved in the buying. Another East Coast factor is the trips you'll have to make there shopping, then buying and surveying. You didn't mention the price range you're looking in?
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 03:14 PM   #4
Guru
 
Crusty Chief's Avatar
 
City: Las Vegas/Portland
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Pairadice
Vessel Model: Selene 47
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,389
Welcome aboard and best of luck on your boat search. Why stop at half way up the inside passage? Gets even better farther up.
Cheers
Crusty Chief is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 04:06 PM   #5
Veteran Member
 
City: Mission Viejo
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 70
I reached that preliminary view of east coast boats inventory pricing based on:
1. What I saw in yachworld.com. (Haven't seen any east coast boats live, yet)
2. Boats and prices we have seen and visited in southern CA from Ventura County to San Diego (still looking at more boats)
3. Our primary list of 'must haves':
a. Inside ceiling clearance of 6'4" minimum. (We're tall people, 12 '5" combined)
b. Cockpit 3'-4' should suffice
c. Twin Diesels. Powerful enough to handle PNW currents. I like the economy of Lehman 120s, but not sure if they are sufficient.
d. Lower helm a must. We plan to cruise in the fall/early spring times.
e. Priced at or under $150,000.
__________________
After many years of deep thinking, I have come to the conclusions that I am a nobody, and that nobody is perfect.....Does that make me perfect? I better stop thinking so much.
GANDK2PNW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 04:15 PM   #6
Veteran Member
 
City: Mission Viejo
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
I'd be careful about saying the East Coast has a better selection and better prices. While it does in total, that doesn't necessarily translate into more or lower priced boats for the PNW. There is a lot of difference in the boats you'll see in the PNW and those on the East Coast, especially those in Florida.

As to shipping across country, it obviously depends a lot on the boat, will a flybridge need removing, what kind of permit, what route can be used, pilot vehicles. $15,000 may well be an average but many above and below.

As to shipping on a vessel, yes, it's expensive, but doesn't it's affordability really depend on how much you saved in the buying. Another East Coast factor is the trips you'll have to make there shopping, then buying and surveying. You didn't mention the price range you're looking in?
Also and aft cabin is a must.
I answered some of your questions below. Sorry, still learning to use the site tools
__________________
After many years of deep thinking, I have come to the conclusions that I am a nobody, and that nobody is perfect.....Does that make me perfect? I better stop thinking so much.
GANDK2PNW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 04:48 PM   #7
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 16,521
Quote:
Originally Posted by GANDK2PNW View Post
I reached that preliminary view of east coast boats inventory pricing based on:
1. What I saw in yachworld.com. (Haven't seen any east coast boats live, yet)
2. Boats and prices we have seen and visited in southern CA from Ventura County to San Diego (still looking at more boats)
3. Our primary list of 'must haves':
a. Inside ceiling clearance of 6'4" minimum. (We're tall people, 12 '5" combined)
b. Cockpit 3'-4' should suffice
c. Twin Diesels. Powerful enough to handle PNW currents. I like the economy of Lehman 120s, but not sure if they are sufficient.
d. Lower helm a must. We plan to cruise in the fall/early spring times.
e. Priced at or under $150,000.
Good answers and I just scanned YW as well. The availability of boats varies widely by brand. For instance, Hatteras is very heavy east coast, but Californian and many of the Chinese trawlers heavy west coast. Some boats heavier PNW than the Southern CA area. I don't see price likely to justify the cost and the effort of transporting, which I would estimate $15k +/-. I just don't see more than a 10% price difference. However, if the boat of your dreams is on the East Coast, the pricing may make it justifiable to transport.

We're 12'2" combined so you win. Fortunately we don't require that much head room but 6'4" won't work either. Lower Helm is also one of our musts and eliminates some very nice boats.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 04:52 PM   #8
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beachcomber
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,496
I thought you were on the right track until you said "aft cabin". From my experience as an old fart you will spend too much time going up and down steps on an aft cabin boat. It's usually 4-5 steps up a ladder to get on board, then you walk a few steps and it's up or down more steps to get where you're going on the boat.

That's not too bad until you get to my age (just turned 70), then the steps can become a real PITA. They're not bad in a calm sea, but when the boat's rocking I don't want to be going up and down a bunch of steps.

I helped a guy take a 57' boat from Seattle to Stockton 3 years ago. It was pilothouse model with 5-6 steps down to the salon, 5-6 up to the bridge, and from the salon about 10 steps down to the staterooms. When the boat was in rough water those stops were really difficult to maneuver.

Also, make sure there is easy access to the sides of the boat to hang fenders from cleats and rails. There's about a 55' Hatteras aft cabin next to my slip. There are ZERO place aft of amidship to hang any fenders from. That would be a royal PITA if you're heading into a marina.

Just saying.
__________________
Mike and Tina
Beachcomber 1995 Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
GFC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 05:07 PM   #9
Veteran Member
 
City: Mission Viejo
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by GFC View Post
I thought you were on the right track until you said "aft cabin". From my experience as an old fart you will spend too much time going up and down steps on an aft cabin boat. It's usually 4-5 steps up a ladder to get on board, then you walk a few steps and it's up or down more steps to get where you're going on the boat.

That's not too bad until you get to my age (just turned 70), then the steps can become a real PITA. They're not bad in a calm sea, but when the boat's rocking I don't want to be going up and down a bunch of steps.

I helped a guy take a 57' boat from Seattle to Stockton 3 years ago. It was pilothouse model with 5-6 steps down to the salon, 5-6 up to the bridge, and from the salon about 10 steps down to the staterooms. When the boat was in rough water those stops were really difficult to maneuver.

Also, make sure there is easy access to the sides of the boat to hang fenders from cleats and rails. There's about a 55' Hatteras aft cabin next to my slip. There are ZERO place aft of amidship to hang any fenders from. That would be a royal PITA if you're heading into a marina.

Just saying.
The boat we chose will have a cockpit, preferably no more than 3'-4'. Good for fishing, cleaning and cooking when we anchor out, as well as store some things like bikes or kayaks. The cockpit should also help with access from the stern, even if we have to navigate a few steps up down to the main saloon and flybridge. Luckily, we're still in enough good shape that we can physically handle it.
We have 2 large labradoodles, and plan to modify those steps from straight up climbing ladders to block steps, as necessary. Most CPMYs we've seen have the room to for it.
We know we'll also need a dock ladder, plank or both. But we'll add that based on the boat we choose.
__________________
After many years of deep thinking, I have come to the conclusions that I am a nobody, and that nobody is perfect.....Does that make me perfect? I better stop thinking so much.
GANDK2PNW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 05:31 PM   #10
Veteran Member
 
City: Mission Viejo
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by GFC View Post
I thought you were on the right track until you said "aft cabin". From my experience as an old fart you will spend too much time going up and down steps on an aft cabin boat. It's usually 4-5 steps up a ladder to get on board, then you walk a few steps and it's up or down more steps to get where you're going on the boat.

That's not too bad until you get to my age (just turned 70), then the steps can become a real PITA. They're not bad in a calm sea, but when the boat's rocking I don't want to be going up and down a bunch of steps.

I helped a guy take a 57' boat from Seattle to Stockton 3 years ago. It was pilothouse model with 5-6 steps down to the salon, 5-6 up to the bridge, and from the salon about 10 steps down to the staterooms. When the boat was in rough water those stops were really difficult to maneuver.

Also, make sure there is easy access to the sides of the boat to hang fenders from cleats and rails. There's about a 55' Hatteras aft cabin next to my slip. There are ZERO place aft of amidship to hang any fenders from. That would be a royal PITA if you're heading into a marina.

Just saying.
As for the aft cabin, it's a non-negotiable item with the Mrs, which I agree with for different reasons. She must have enough bedroom clothing storage, I must have enough room in the mattress to stretch my legs.
I also do not want the extra rolling and bobbing motion of a fore cabin. Been there done that when I lived in the Caribbean.
__________________
After many years of deep thinking, I have come to the conclusions that I am a nobody, and that nobody is perfect.....Does that make me perfect? I better stop thinking so much.
GANDK2PNW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 06:09 PM   #11
Guru
 
Russell Clifton's Avatar
 
City: Anacortes Wa.
Country: usa
Vessel Name: Sea Fever
Vessel Model: Defever 49 RPH
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 522
Sounds like you know exactly what you want. Good for you!

It blows my mind how many people on the west coat want to buy a boat on the east coast and how many on the east cost want to buy a boat on the west coast. Seems like a really big hassle to me. That east cost boat better be a really good deal considering travel expenses to view, to survey, and to ship across the country. Keep in mind, don't buy a east coast boat that is not that common in the PNW as it will be harder to sell.

The last two boats I've bought were within 40 miles of my home. Easy to view, easy to survey, and easy to handle all the paper work.

If you want to cruise at 10 kts, any trawler with Lehman 120's might be a challenge. It's going to take more horse power than that. So there goes your fuel economy. My 49 Defever with the 135's would nearly be running full throttle to attain 10 kts.

The Tollycraft boats are very popular up here and they make aft cabin models that can easily cruise that fast. Not sure about the head room. Trawlers with a aft cabin and a cockpit will be a challenge. It will be a open cockpit and not covered or enclosed, at least I have never seen one. The Grand Banks are also plentiful but most of them are not 10 kt. boats either.

Keep in mind that the best part of boating up here is the trip there, so why rush it? Slow down to 7 kts, see a lot more wild life, and save some money.

Have fun, looking for the right boat is best. Hope to see you out here.
Russell Clifton is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 06:35 PM   #12
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 7,668
Stick to the West Coast. For the added cost of purchasing and shipping you could buy a better boat on the West Coast. The other issue is that you will need diesel heat. I would bet that half of the boats you see on the East coast will have that.

Reconsider the requirement for twins. It will limit you unnecessarily.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 07:00 PM   #13
Veteran Member
 
City: Mission Viejo
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Russell Clifton View Post
Sounds like you know exactly what you want. Good for you!

It blows my mind how many people on the west coat want to buy a boat on the east coast and how many on the east cost want to buy a boat on the west coast. Seems like a really big hassle to me. That east cost boat better be a really good deal considering travel expenses to view, to survey, and to ship across the country. Keep in mind, don't buy a east coast boat that is not that common in the PNW as it will be harder to sell.

The last two boats I've bought were within 40 miles of my home. Easy to view, easy to survey, and easy to handle all the paper work.

If you want to cruise at 10 kts, any trawler with Lehman 120's might be a challenge. It's going to take more horse power than that. So there goes your fuel economy. My 49 Defever with the 135's would nearly be running full throttle to attain 10 kts.

The Tollycraft boats are very popular up here and they make aft cabin models that can easily cruise that fast. Not sure about the head room. Trawlers with a aft cabin and a cockpit will be a challenge. It will be a open cockpit and not covered or enclosed, at least I have never seen one. The Grand Banks are also plentiful but most of them are not 10 kt. boats either.

Keep in mind that the best part of boating up here is the trip there, so why rush it? Slow down to 7 kts, see a lot more wild life, and save some money.

Have fun, looking for the right boat is best. Hope to see you out here.
Thank you for your valid points. I do appreciate them.
I am not mesmerized with the idea of an east coast boat, and all the hassles associated with it (travel to see, choose, survey, repair, transport, etc etc). But I'm not yet ready to ditch that market yet, if the volume of boats available also means a good deal can be found.

The 10kt + power we want is not to get there faster. That's the least of our concerns. I believe wholeheartedly in "I'll be there when I get there" philosophy. But I also want to avoid getting stuck on 'going nowhere' mode when we face the 5-7 kt currents in many areas of the PNW.

That's also why I'll be carrying at least 3 oversized anchors with plenty of galvanized chain, not just rode (but I'll open that dreaded can of worms for discussion some other time).

So, yes, Lehmans 120s/135s and even Perkins 200s seem a bit underpowered for the task.
CAT 3208s seem more suitable, even if I must sacrifice fuel economy.
Someone told me Volvo Pentas are 300hp per side, but the maintenance is just as high as the CATs.
I will not buy big Detroit engines, either. I want a dry engine room, free of oil leaks. Everyone I know that has those things wishes they did not have to deal with a wet engine room.

We are following some 30+ boats right now on YW, down from the original list of 120. Gone are the flush decks and the no-lower helm boats. The majority of those remaining on the list are on the west coast, though.

We're seeing boats near our home in southern CA. But after buying it, home will be somewhere near Anacortes, Poulsbo in fall/winter, and Campbel River / Sidney in spring/summer.
__________________
After many years of deep thinking, I have come to the conclusions that I am a nobody, and that nobody is perfect.....Does that make me perfect? I better stop thinking so much.
GANDK2PNW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 07:14 PM   #14
Veteran Member
 
City: Mission Viejo
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
Stick to the West Coast. For the added cost of purchasing and shipping you could buy a better boat on the West Coast. The other issue is that you will need diesel heat. I would bet that half of the boats you see on the East coast will have that.

Reconsider the requirement for twins. It will limit you unnecessarily.
Thank you, Guru

The Mrs. wants Air Conditioning, even though very hot summer days in the PNW are not as extensive as we see in SoCal. That's why I began looking at east coast boats, most of them have it. On the other hand, I may be able to convince her that space cooler can get the job done.
I agree with you that heating is a much higher priority than AC.

The twin engines are non-negotiable items. I am not mechnically inclined, or experienced enough with powerboats to chance lossing engine power in those currents. I'll be learning a lot these next few months about maintenance and system functions, but I won't ever pretend or presume to be able to make emergency repairs in case of engine failure.
__________________
After many years of deep thinking, I have come to the conclusions that I am a nobody, and that nobody is perfect.....Does that make me perfect? I better stop thinking so much.
GANDK2PNW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 07:28 PM   #15
Veteran Member
 
City: Mission Viejo
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crusty Chief View Post
Welcome aboard and best of luck on your boat search. Why stop at half way up the inside passage? Gets even better farther up.
Cheers
John & Tracey,
Thank you for the welcome!
We know that inside passage to southern AK is magnificient. But I'm a cautious curious cat.
Our first year board will be limited to exploring no further north from Anacortes than Alert Bay and the Broughon islands. There is enough there to keep us busy for a year. After that, we'll know more about everything needed to dare explore more.
__________________
After many years of deep thinking, I have come to the conclusions that I am a nobody, and that nobody is perfect.....Does that make me perfect? I better stop thinking so much.
GANDK2PNW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 07:39 PM   #16
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 16,521
Quote:
Originally Posted by GANDK2PNW View Post
As for the aft cabin, it's a non-negotiable item with the Mrs, which I agree with for different reasons. She must have enough bedroom clothing storage, I must have enough room in the mattress to stretch my legs.
I also do not want the extra rolling and bobbing motion of a fore cabin. Been there done that when I lived in the Caribbean.
How do you not get that with a mid cabin?
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 08:33 PM   #17
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,770
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
Stick to the West Coast. .... The other issue is that you will need diesel heat. I would bet that half of the boats you see on the East coast will have that.
I agree completely about heat. But on the east coast, I think you will find almost zero boats with diesel heat. It's just not done. Boats either get hauled for the winter, or move south.

The companion consideration is AC. In the east, nearly all boats have AC. Not so much in the PNW. In fact lots of boats don't have AC.

Having AC does no harm, but I think you really need diesel heat if you will be in the PNW for an extended period.
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 09:08 PM   #18
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 7,668
Quote:
Originally Posted by GANDK2PNW View Post
The Mrs. wants Air Conditioning, even though very hot summer days in the PNW are not as extensive as we see in SoCal. That's why I began looking at east coast boats, most of them have it. On the other hand, I may be able to convince her that space cooler can get the job done.
I agree with you that heating is a much higher priority than AC.

The twin engines are non-negotiable items. I am not mechnically inclined, or experienced enough with powerboats to chance lossing engine power in those currents. I'll be learning a lot these next few months about maintenance and system functions, but I won't ever pretend or presume to be able to make emergency repairs in case of engine failure.
FWIW, "Guru" simply means that I post a lot, not that I have any knowledge about any of the things I post.

This last summer was very warm, and there were times when the boat was uncomfortably hot. So if your wife wants AC, then you need AC. However, the AC will be important on those hot days in late July and August, heat will be used almost year round.

Single vs Twins is a religious debate dealing with faith, superstition, and dogma. You will find plenty of folks who share your belief and I won't try to convince you otherwise.

I think your overall plan to find a boat and explore up here is a great one. You will run out of years before you run out of places to explore.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 09:20 PM   #19
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,770
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
FWIW, "Guru" simply means that I post a lot, not that I have any knowledge about any of the things I post.

This last summer was very warm, and there were times when the boat was uncomfortably hot. So if your wife wants AC, then you need AC. However, the AC will be important on those hot days in late July and August, heat will be used almost year round.

Single vs Twins is a religious debate dealing with faith, superstition, and dogma. You will find plenty of folks who share your belief and I won't try to convince you otherwise.

I think your overall plan to find a boat and explore up here is a great one. You will run out of years before you run out of places to explore.
You actually ARE a guru. Great advice!
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016, 10:05 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Tuttouomo's Avatar
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Lady A
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 133
G&K, Welcome and good luck on your new adventure. Amy and I spent a lot of time looking at boats from San Diego to Bellingham and realized that narrowing our search to the PNW where we would keep it made the most sense. We took our time and our boat found us, and happened to be in Tacoma!
A must upgrade for us was the diesel heat system, as for a/c, the days are few that it is necessary and the nights are cool with not much humidity .
Also what you see on YW and what you see in person, is usually quite different. Board as many boats as you can so you can start to get a feel for what feels right for your purpose.
We moor in Everett and spend most of our time aboard as live aboards, heat is essential. Our dirt house is in socal and we currently go back and forth.
The pic is our dock this morning, inside the boat........toasty.

Bill
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	6247.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	83.6 KB
ID:	59445  
__________________

Tuttouomo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012