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Old 08-08-2011, 09:26 PM   #41
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RE: buying a trawler

"We've talked about this before but it isn't dumb if the buyers of your semi-planing boats want to semi-plane them at 14-18 knots or whatever."

Yes but if they want to go 14-18 knots then they should get a boat that is designed for that speed. And if they want to go 7-9 knots they should also get a boat designed for that and it is NOT the same boat. That's what is dumb about it. If for example you have a 42' GB w a single Lehman powered to go 7 knots it should not have a hull designed for 11-12 knots. Slow boats have a very narrow speed range. The slower the boat the narrower the speed range so a 7 knot boat has a speed/power range far less than 100% so at least one configuration can't be judged to be a good responsible combination of power and hull design. I think your boat is properly powered but the single is an under powered medium speed hull (in trawler terms). Ironically I would not look at a twin for myself in a GB 36 as it's too heavy and burns too much fuel properly loaded. Last winter I found a GB 36 single. It was powered by a Deer. But my ideal GB 36 would have twin 50hp engines.
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Old 08-08-2011, 09:46 PM   #42
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RE: buying a trawler

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Marin wrote:
So it all depends on what an individual likes.* But this notion that a semi-planing hull is*less rolly*and so has a "better ride" needs to be taken with a grain of salt.* A better ride for one person may be a horrible ride for the next person.



-- Edited by Marin on Monday 8th of August 2011 07:57:05 PM
You're right Marin.**Perhaps my wife has just been humoring me all these years!
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Old 08-08-2011, 10:32 PM   #43
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RE: buying a trawler

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Yes but if they want to go 14-18 knots then they should get a boat that is designed for that speed. And if they want to go 7-9 knots they should also get a boat designed for that and it is NOT the same boat.
But to the market GB appeals to, they ARE the same boat.* A whole bunch of GB buyers in the 1990s, 2000s, and still today want a boat they can go from here to Desolation Sound in 1 or 1.5 days at a speed of 16 knots or so burning 25-30 gph, then when they get there they want to meander around at 8 knots or so for*a week or however long their vacation is burning 8 gph, and then they want to blast back to Puget Sound at 16 knots in a day or so. They call it "maximizing the use of their time."*

They don't want a purely planing boat because they tend to not have the same*volume of space in them in the same length boat.* They want the Grand Banks interior space and*configuration but they want to be able to run it fast to get somewhere, at which point they want to run it slow.* This was explained to me in great detail by the then-owner of our local GB dealership some years ago and he made a lot of money selling these folks the kind of boat that would do exactly*what they wanted to do.

Now whether or not someone agrees with what these boaters want to do is something else.* But the point is that*this is what they want to do and Grand Banks and other manufacturers like Nordic Tug sell a lot of boats to this market.* And in the end, the boats that sell are the ones that appeal to the market.

A 16-knot,*twin-engine, 900-plus horsepower, semi-planing*Grand Banks may not make sense to some people.* But if a person thinks it's dumb, I suggest their quarrel is not with Grand Banks but with the people who want Grand Banks to*build that kind of boat and who*back up their desires with their wallets.
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Old 08-09-2011, 09:35 AM   #44
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buying a trawler

Quote:
Marin wrote:*A whole bunch of GB buyers in the 1990s, 2000s, and still today want a boat they can go from here to Desolation Sound in 1 or 1.5 days at a speed of 16 knots.......
A 16-knot,*twin-engine, 900-plus horsepower, semi-planing*Grand Banks may not make sense to some people...............

******* It does to me!* That's exactly what I want. Add a Euro configuration & I would be one happy cruiser. Both my wife & I think the 42' GB Euro is our choice for a cruising boat. We do like the 41 Zeus but there's not enough G2 available yet.







-- Edited by SeaHorse II on Tuesday 9th of August 2011 09:46:03 AM
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Old 08-09-2011, 09:57 AM   #45
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RE: buying a trawler

Marin and Walt,

Sounds good to me those last 2 posts. Iv'e got nothing against going fast and slow a great deal of the time but when a manufacturer builds a semi-planing boat and only provides displacement speed power* .......THAT"S DUMB* ........from a design point of view. The old GBs w single engines should have had a different shaped stern and they did'nt get it because the designers/builders were so focused on the almighty buck they threw what little ethics and design principals they had out the window. I will not be sucked into any more babble to support this. I'm out'a here.
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Old 08-09-2011, 10:01 AM   #46
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RE: buying a trawler

Quote:
nomadwilly wrote:....but when a manufacturer builds a semi-planing boat and only provides displacement speed power* .......THAT"S DUMB
* * * ** Couldn't agree more!
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Old 08-09-2011, 10:36 AM   #47
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buying a trawler

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nomadwilly wrote:when a manufacturer builds a semi-planing boat and only provides displacement speed power* .......THAT"S DUMB* ........from a design point of view.
Could be.* On the other hand one has to consider what things were like in the mid-60s when American Marine came out with their GB line of boats.* Powerful marine diesels of a size that would fit 32, 36, and 42 foot boats were not readily available, or available at all.* Also, diesel engines are expensive, and they were then, too.* The single engine boat was cheaper by at least the price of one engine and runnng gear.* Also, American Marine in their literature of the day, and in magazine reviews of the GB line, all cite the "seakeeping abilities and stable ride" of their hull.

So perhaps at the time, the advantages they felt were inherent in that hull design warranted its use even though the "go really fast to get there" era was far in the future.* The ads and magazine reviews of that era make no mention of the ability to drive the boat more than 8 knots or so--- that seems to have been the design objective, an 8-knot "dependable diesel cruiser."*

American Marine was no stranger to building boats with displacement hulls--- for years prior to the introduction of the Grand Banks and Alaskan lines they built power and sailboats designed by other people including Sparkman & Stevens, William Garden, Nat Herreshoff and Ray Hunt.* So I don't think it was ignorance that led them to choose a semi-planing hull for the GB.* (By the way, there is no mention of "semi-planing" or "semi-displacement" or semi-anything in the early ads, literature, or reviews of GBs.)* The only way to know what was truly in their minds when they chose that particular hull configuration is to ask them, and there are not many of the folks who were active at American Marine back then around anymore.


-- Edited by Marin on Tuesday 9th of August 2011 10:39:24 AM
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Old 08-09-2011, 01:55 PM   #48
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RE: buying a trawler

"There's no doubt which one I (and my spouse) prefer. "


Your opinion might be very different underway with 6 ft waves abeam every 9 seconds, rather than in a slip.

Or out in blue water , where the waves get interesting.

After a while the wide beamy boat will simply follow the wave contours , like a Cat or a Try.
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Old 05-31-2015, 07:43 PM   #49
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Yes, whether or not you have covered moorage is important. For older boats with lots of brightwork, if they came out of a boathouse they have to go right back in.
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Old 05-31-2015, 08:22 PM   #50
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Agreed, you'll only need 80 hp and the second is also a (possible) high-capacity alternator and turning boost.
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Old 05-31-2015, 08:41 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by djones44 View Post
Agreed, you'll only need 80 hp and the second is also a (possible) high-capacity alternator and turning boost.
I agree. Something like a normally-aspirated John Deere 4045 diesel engine, a 150-amp alternator, and a bow thruster. Works for me!
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Old 06-01-2015, 10:33 AM   #52
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I have been aboard many sport fish , none seem to have enchanted forests below ,

but at speed the true planing vessel does not get that much worse fuel mileage (sometimes better) than the big SD wallowers.

Why not 30K or more instead of 16K , if its the same fuel bill?

And most had a generous cockpit , so outside could be enjoyed , instead of viewed from a window or oxygen tent.
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