Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-05-2015, 02:28 PM   #21
Guru
 
dhmeissner's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: North America
Vessel Name: The Promise
Vessel Model: Roughwater 35
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,326
My boat backs to starboard and the helm is on starboard as well. Suits me just fine but I can't say I prefer one over the other. I can't imagine why my admiral would care.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Dave & Suzie - Roughwater 35
http://thepromiserwb1029.org/2012/09...the-promise-2/
dhmeissner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2015, 02:33 PM   #22
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
I've never had anything but single screws. On a boat that walks to port in reverse, my preferred docking is port side to and therefore a port side helm. My volvo walked to starboard and I preferred the starboard helm with starboard side docking .... I just found it made backing in to a slip easier.
With my left-handed propeller resulting in starboard propwalk, I'm pleased to have a starboard helm. Usually dock to starboard, and the deck is just one step from the helm.

Railroad locomotives have starboard "helm," so nothing feels wrong as long as one has good visibility.



Middle helms grow more attractive as boats get larger.
__________________

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2015, 06:22 PM   #23
Veteran Member
 
City: PEI
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Sea Dog
Vessel Model: Jeaneau 21
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 77
starboard/right , as for color. Get Rum - Green Right
Seadog2013 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2015, 09:03 PM   #24
Veteran Member
 
City: Brooklin
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 30
As pokeboat points out, prop walk in reverse should determine which side the helm is on. On single screw boats, a right hand prop will turn counterclockwise in reverse (viewed from the stern) and the stern will tend to walk to port when put astern. The makes docking easier. Left hand prop, starboard side helm. This doesn't apply to twin screw or outboard powered boats.

The best helm position for a single hander (which most of us are at some point) is on the side that the stern walks to in reverse, and right next to a door that opens onto a convenient spring line cleat.
Doug H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2015, 10:32 PM   #25
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,670
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug H View Post
As pokeboat points out, prop walk in reverse should determine which side the helm is on.....The best helm position for a single hander (which most of us are at some point) is on the side that the stern walks to in reverse, and right next to a door that opens onto a convenient spring line cleat.
Precisely. Otherwise it is quite academic in boats. Here in Aus, we drive on the left of the road, so have right hand drive vehicles, but at sea the international rules mean we still pass port to port, rather like driving one of our cars in the US. It's not hard to adapt.

What is neat is I dock to starboard, (bow in), and the pilot door is right there next to my starboard side helm, so I can quickly exit for docking, and the reverse prop walk is also to starboard. The helm on the other side would be way less convenient.
__________________
Pete
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2015, 12:34 PM   #26
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cygnus
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,378
All kinds of good "reasons" for one side or the other, but I've always been taught that it's got nothing to do with prop walk or which side the dock is on.

The real reason: per NavRules, the vessel to your starboard is the stand-on. You need to give way to anything on that side. Hence that's the side you want the best visibility.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2015, 02:01 PM   #27
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,802
Quote:
The real reason: per NavRules, the vessel to your starboard is the stand-on. You need to give way to anything on that side. Hence that's the side you want the best visibility.
If it puts you in the corner, how does it give you better visibility to that side of a vessel off the front quarter of that side, versus a center helm or one on the other side? Using your boat as an example for instance.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2015, 05:20 PM   #28
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,715
Seems obvious to me George,

One can see better to stbd if they are on the stbd side of the vessel.
I don't understand this business about being in the corner though.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2015, 06:49 PM   #29
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,919
Often the corner you are in has larger blind spots because you are closer to the boats parts creating them. Simple optics.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2015, 08:16 PM   #30
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,802
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
Seems obvious to me George,

One can see better to stbd if they are on the stbd side of the vessel.
I don't understand this business about being in the corner though.
Look at the picture of your boat. If you are hard starboard with your helm, then you have that pillar right in your way to detect a vessel coming from your forward port quarter. Center or port helm, the pillar is out of the equation.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2015, 04:44 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Bendit's Avatar
 
City: Auckland
Country: New Zealand
Vessel Name: Pioneer
Vessel Model: Westcoaster 53 converted to pleasure
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 283
The PO of Pioneer (commercial fisherman) told me for commercial vessels, the "working side" is the side the boat reverses towards.
As earlier mentioned, a right-hand prop walks to port in reverse so port becomes the working side and the helm, and wheel house door if there is one, should be on the port side.
Seems sensible to me.
Bendit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2015, 04:48 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Liberty2015's Avatar
 
City: Pittwater
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Liberty
Vessel Model: 57 foot Halvorsen
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 178
Hey Bendit,

How's that 3406 goin !!!!

Cheers Chris D Liberty
Liberty2015 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2015, 06:21 PM   #33
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Post #31 works for me. Works opposite for me having propwalk to starboard with a starboard helm.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2015, 08:35 PM   #34
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,670
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptTom View Post
All kinds of good "reasons" for one side or the other, but I've always been taught that it's got nothing to do with prop walk or which side the dock is on.

The real reason: per NavRules, the vessel to your starboard is the stand-on. You need to give way to anything on that side. Hence that's the side you want the best visibility.
Seems all a bit weird...but lots of things seem to lack logic. The international sea rules re passing/converging traffic are such that we pass port to port, while steering on the right, and, as you say, give way to the right. You'd think if optimum visibility is the priority it would seem to make more sense then for boats to also pass st'bd to st'bd, wouldn't it..? As we do in a number of countries, Australia included, where we drive on the left, in RHD vehicles, and also give way to the right(starboard), on our roads. In countries like the US, with LHD, (driving on the right side of the road), you give way to the left, (port side), i.e. the side you are driving from. It appears the rules of the sea are a mix of both systems.
__________________
Pete
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2015, 08:54 PM   #35
Guru
 
cappy208's Avatar
 
City: Cape Cod
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slip Aweigh
Vessel Model: Prairie 29
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
You'd think if optimum visibility is the priority
There is an old adage in the marine industry: "Most collisions occur from which quadrant?"

skipping ahead, most answer from the Starboard (the give way side)

Untrue. Most collisions occur from the PORT. The side we tend to think of as the 'safe side'. We get a lull into thinking that others will 'obey' the rules and turn to the right, and keep a lookout. The problem is the people who are NOT keeping a proper (effective) lookout are the ones who run into others. Think auto and lane collisions. Now add into this the problem of complacency. Doomed.

Regarding the helm position, on vessels small enough, the side is determined by the accessibility to the mooring line access and the hand of the prop. Not sure what size is considered single handed appropriate, but this usually is determined by ability and aptitude.
cappy208 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2015, 10:38 PM   #36
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,715
Quote:
Originally Posted by caltexflanc View Post
Look at the picture of your boat. If you are hard starboard with your helm, then you have that pillar right in your way to detect a vessel coming from your forward port quarter. Center or port helm, the pillar is out of the equation.
Thanks George,
To stbd Iv'e got one "pillar" but to port I've got at least four. And moving my head 2" clears the stbd pillar but to clear the port pillars I'd need to move my head 10" at least and look in 3 or 4 spots. I feel my visability is better to stbd .. where my helm is.
I have so many windows there's good visability but in close next to a float if possible I'd want to be on the float side of the boat.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2015, 04:31 AM   #37
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,802
Eric, I really should have quoted Capt. Tom, whose boat I was referencing. I just noticed that miscue. Oops!
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2015, 07:58 AM   #38
Guru
 
Brooksie's Avatar
 
City: Cape Cod, MA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Island Seeker
Vessel Model: Willard 36 Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 954
I am fine with my port helm & LH prop, I can turn 1/2 way in the seat to carry on a conversation and still watch the danger zone. In my boat with the s'board helm, I can't do that.
Both back towerds their helm side so I land on that side when I can. I see no problem and would never reject a boat for that reason.
Brooksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2015, 03:58 PM   #39
Senior Member
 
Bendit's Avatar
 
City: Auckland
Country: New Zealand
Vessel Name: Pioneer
Vessel Model: Westcoaster 53 converted to pleasure
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liberty2015 View Post
Hey Bendit,

How's that 3406 goin !!!!

Cheers Chris D Liberty
Hi Chris,
Engine's good but trans rear seal is leaking a bit. I'll have to pull it out (BIG JOB as it weighs 195Kg) at the end of summer - probably June.
Cheers,
Bendit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2015, 04:30 PM   #40
Veteran Member
 
Wanderin Star's Avatar
 
City: Michigan City, Ind
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 69
Wrong side

IDK. It all sounds to me like the optimum size of the space shuttle booster rockets was decided centuries ago by the spacing between the wheels of Roman war chariots.
__________________

Wanderin Star is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012