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Old 12-24-2015, 06:06 PM   #21
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30 years personal experience
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Old 12-24-2015, 06:19 PM   #22
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If the boat is in salt water when not being used, you do want to tilt the engine up; it will drain fine and not get growth on it.
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Old 12-24-2015, 06:55 PM   #23
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You don't want to leave an engine tilted up in freezing weather...fresh or salt.

30 years personal experience is equal to 15 minutes of full time experience in the trades.... in my experience.

Exceptions to both...sure...but not all that many.
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Old 12-24-2015, 07:08 PM   #24
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Who said anything about freezing weather? Though I have seen it done in freezing weather, including the little 40 Merc on my Whaler, here in NC on any number of boats with no consequences. Maybe you are talking about something far south of the teens, where salt water freezes, or very old engines? I suspect the latter.
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Old 12-24-2015, 07:28 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caltexflanc View Post
If the boat is in salt water when not being used, you do want to tilt the engine up; it will drain fine and not get growth on it.
This has always been the case in my world. Salt or fresh. However up on the Great Lakes once you started to see freezing nighttime temperatures the motor stays in the water.
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Old 12-24-2015, 08:59 PM   #26
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Ocean water freezes just like freshwater, but at lower temperatures. Fresh water freezes at 32 degrees Fahrenheit but seawater freezes at about 28.4 degrees Fahrenheit, because of the salt in it.

Can the ocean freeze?
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Old 12-24-2015, 09:47 PM   #27
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To be fair to the OP....


The averaged salinity in the global ocean is 35.5 PSU, varying from less than 15 PSU at the mouth of the rivers to more than 40 PSU in the Dead Sea.
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:57 PM   #28
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So tell me fellas, why is having half of your lower unit in the water better than having it drained and out of the water? So all those dry stack and trailer storage people should scurry and stick their motor in the water when it's cold? My gosh how do those thousands of motors survive all those years?
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:58 PM   #29
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So tell me fellas, why is having half of your lower unit in the water better than having it drained and out of the water? So all those dry stack and trailer storage people should scurry and stick their motor in the water when it's cold? My gosh how do those thousands of motors survive all those years?
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Old 12-25-2015, 12:20 AM   #30
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'Drained' is the key word. If tilted up after drained, it better not be open to the elements...
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Old 12-25-2015, 01:23 AM   #31
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Fresh water is 8.33 pounds per gallon. Salt water is 9.0 pounds per gallon. Weigh a gallon of your water and you'll have your answer.
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Old 12-25-2015, 01:33 AM   #32
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Drain the OB engine completely, then store it in any position the mfr recommends. You just need to ensure you don't have water in the lower unit and other orifices during freezing temps. If you feel the need to flush, do it once a month or whatever feels right at your convenience.

Engines are more tolerant of saltwater than I think we give them credit for. I have NEVER flushed my diesels and they're 3000+ hrs/38 yrs old and still going strong.
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Old 12-25-2015, 06:44 AM   #33
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I've always thought you were better off tipping up the motor. Assumed saltwater corrosion was long term bad and that marine growth would start to form on the immersed parts. From Psneeld's chart, it appears that the OP is essentially in fresh water. Guess I'd just leave it up or down as you prefer and not worry about flushing it.

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Old 12-25-2015, 06:54 AM   #34
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To flush or not to flush , is not the question.

Weather you tilt the engine out of the water after use may have a larger effect on service life.
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Old 12-25-2015, 09:34 AM   #35
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Brackish water and flushing an outboard

Please check my Science... Doesn't marine growth require light? I know fauna (weeds & grasses) don't grow in darkness. What about barnacles and such? Just wondering...


Oh, and Merry Christmas to all. I hope Santa was as good to all as he was to this this transplanted Texan.
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Old 12-25-2015, 10:14 AM   #36
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The parts in most lower units are like a British battery.

aluminum, steel ,SS, brass , bronze and God knows what else.

In addition to the electric corrosion having shaft seals underwater 100% of the time is an invitation to failure.

When sea water gets inside the lower unit the real fun begins.
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Old 12-25-2015, 11:19 AM   #37
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The parts in most lower units are like a British battery.

aluminum, steel ,SS, brass , bronze and God knows what else.

In addition to the electric corrosion having shaft seals underwater 100% of the time is an invitation to failure.

When sea water gets inside the lower unit the real fun begins.
I respect your opinions and doing it whatever way works for you. I do however feel your views are skewed a bit by years of history and not as much in touch with today's technology on outboards. Around us, almost all are kept in water. On the lake, it was the same. When I was a kid they use to joke about a Mercury mechanic's most important tool being a pry bar to force the lower unit apart. The dealers would warn customers in advance that they might have to replace the housing after it broke in the process. The minerals in our water practically welded it together.

But other motors started doing a better job and soon all followed. Now, we don't ignore the units. We clean and maintain just as we do the hull. And lower unit maintenance, always replacing crush washers (or drain plug gaskets). That's the key.
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Old 12-25-2015, 04:40 PM   #38
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Being close to the freeway were about 13 miles up from the coast.
Which is about 5 miles down river from the power plant. You'd think that would be far enough up to be fresh but we still get tidal action so I assume we get salt with it.
I like the chart in post 4.
225hp outboard motors get expensive when you replace them for no reason.
Rivers may well be tidal well upstream of the intrusion of the saltwater wedge. The dynamic effect of tides on water height of the Fraser River and indeed fish migration occurs above Mission, BC (60 nm upstream of the mouth) even at the end of August during years of low river flow. However, the salt water wedge only reaches Annacis Island, ~18 nm upstream and then only in the periods of lowest river flows and highest tides. Al Ages' classic paper shows that the saltwater wedge in the Fraser River is clearly quite dynamic with river flows and tidal heights:

http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/54922.pdf

Figure 9 shows that the wedge doesn't get anywhere near where our vessel is tied up (just above Gary Point). In December parts of the hull of our vessel will be in saltwater. (Figures 46+). At sometimes of the year, the halocline is visible on the echosounder. At other times of the year, it isn't visible which means either the halocline is above the transducer, or alternatively the saltwater wedge isn't present.

The only way to be certain is to use a salinity meter at depth across a tidal time series.

Merry Christmas!

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Old 12-26-2015, 07:06 AM   #39
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"When I was a kid they use to joke about a Mercury mechanic's most important tool being a pry bar to force the lower unit apart."

Some things never change. Even today a Harley mechanics best too is a bigger hammer!

Unused outboards do last a long time on a lake , but wrap a fish line in the prop in fresh or sea water or simply have a barnacle start growing in the seal , and better factory paint is not much help.
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Old 12-26-2015, 09:54 AM   #40
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Aluminum anti seize is what i use.


Just be cautious about torque specs as most are for dry threads.
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