Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-14-2016, 10:14 PM   #21
Member
 
City: anacortes wa
Country: california and wash
Vessel Name: american pride
Vessel Model: american tug 36/5
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 22
rails to the cockpit

I am the proud owner of the 3rd boat American Tug built. It's a long step down to the dock from either pilot house doors, If you do in fact plan on using either pilot house door on a REGULAR basis forget the gate-- it will become a pain in the ass. If the conditions warrant you needing a rail for safe passage bow to stern use the salon!! I speak from experience on this topic. If you want to know what your boat wil look like in14 years pm me and i can send you a few pics--steveand tina AMERICAN PRIDE--hull 003
__________________
Advertisement

steveandtina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2016, 10:15 PM   #22
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,980
Self explanatory - avatar and photo.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Large TO Pict - 100_1412.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	103.0 KB
ID:	51984  
__________________

Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2016, 10:28 PM   #23
Guru
 
Hawgwash's Avatar
 
City: Sidney
Country: Canada
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveandtina View Post
I am the proud owner of the 3rd boat American Tug built. It's a long step down to the dock from either pilot house doors, If you do in fact plan on using either pilot house door on a REGULAR basis forget the gate-- it will become a pain in the ass. If the conditions warrant you needing a rail for safe passage bow to stern use the salon!! I speak from experience on this topic. If you want to know what your boat wil look like in14 years pm me and i can send you a few pics--steveand tina AMERICAN PRIDE--hull 003
Probably the best comment yet. Heard it from an owner and it just reinforces; it depends on the boat.
Hawgwash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2016, 11:23 PM   #24
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawgwash View Post
Probably the best comment yet. Heard it from an owner and it just reinforces; it depends on the boat.
Agreed. Now Pig's comments are helpful but I think the side decks on the NT 37 are narrower than the AT 395.

One thing that helps getting on and off the side of the boat near the Pilothouse doors would be a fender step. We used them on our sailboats and our new boat came with one on either side. We have a very high freeboard and yet U can still get on and off pretty well even with really bad knees.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2016, 11:43 PM   #25
Guru
 
Hawgwash's Avatar
 
City: Sidney
Country: Canada
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
Agreed. Now Pig's comments are helpful but I think the side decks on the NT 37 are narrower than the AT 395.
I was quoting Steve AT not Pgi NT.
AT, NT, ADD.
Hawgwash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2016, 11:58 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Nsail's Avatar
 
City: Benicia CA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawgwash View Post
You are forgetting they are coming from a sail boat where, when you look out of the salon/saloon, you see salon/saloon.
I didn't forget anything. I was simply answering his question.
Nsail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 12:34 AM   #27
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nsail View Post
I didn't forget anything. I was simply answering his question.
I appreciate all of these responses actually!
We are making a rather large change from our comfort zone of sailing and although we are not exactly novice boaters (wife has done 2 Atlantic crossings, 1 Pacific crossing, numerous trips to Bermuda, the Bahamas etc, I've done more than most but less than she has) we are not exactly accomplished power boaters!
Sometimes these simple questions are difficult to figure out without the perspective many of you have. Reading these answers tends to make the picture much less fuzzy!

As we move forward in this process I'm sure the nature of the questions will evolve and we will begin to figure more of this out for ourselves.

In the mean time it all helps!

In the example of the original question I asked, it somehow never even occurred to me that I might have an unobstructed view through the windows! On the boats we have owned, there is simply always something obscuring your vision. From lifelines to rigging and sails, it is simply a fact of life. Forget the fact that ports in most sailboats are not even positioned where you can see what interests you without moving! At 6'3" I tend to have to duck down to see out and my 5' tall wife has to stand on something!

Nothing is obvious to us yet in regards to a trawler/tug... looking forward to making the switch!

Bruce
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 01:37 AM   #28
Guru
 
Bob Cofer's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham
Country: US
Vessel Name: Ebbtide
Vessel Model: '72 Grand Banks
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,029
Bruce,

While you may be comfortable it may be a good idea to ask the person who will be handling the lines what they think.

Jill likes/wants the high rails as a margin of safety when she is rigging the lines and fenders.
__________________
What kind of boat is that?
Bob Cofer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 04:38 AM   #29
TF Site Team
 
dimer2's Avatar
 
City: Houston
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Baobab
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4788
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2,193
Our boat has the same two pilot house doors and the rear door to aft deck. We use the side doors to go forward and the rear door for access to the aft deck..period. The fenders and lines used aft are stored and easy/safe to deploy from the safety of the aft deck and the bow and mid ship lines are accessed from the pilot house. If we had full width walk around sides it may be different. Walking through the saloon once or twice a day to do this is not a problem IMO.

You will not always be docked on floating piers. We have had to use the side gate for boarding, often. Low tide, side door and high, swim platform.
__________________
No one who achieves success does so without acknowledging the help of others.
dimer2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 06:41 AM   #30
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,525
Most folks go on the bow to anchor , which is usually in calm waters.

We have hand rails on the fwd cabin , and a 4 ft deep 15ft x 15ft cockpit (after deck) so no rails for us.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 07:11 AM   #31
Guru
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Country: US
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,409
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveandtina View Post
I am the proud owner of the 3rd boat American Tug built. It's a long step down to the dock from either pilot house doors, If you do in fact plan on using either pilot house door on a REGULAR basis forget the gate-- it will become a pain in the ass. If the conditions warrant you needing a rail for safe passage bow to stern use the salon!! I speak from experience on this topic. If you want to know what your boat wil look like in14 years pm me and i can send you a few pics--steveand tina AMERICAN PRIDE--hull 003
Valid point for their use

We have full lgth rails on our Mainship and added a gate at the helm door. It is a higher exit and helpful when tieing up to walls that are higher making exit from cockpit or platform difficult. Admiral loves the security of a safe walk around.... we're Sr citizens + and hope to continue another 10 yrs.
Also handy for hanging fenders when locking, docking or rafting.

Weight the +/- for your situation
__________________
Don
MS 34 HT Trawler
"Bacchus"
Bacchus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 07:19 AM   #32
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
The door is not an option as it comes in all of the American Tug pilothouse's, there is a door on each side actually. There is an option for a gate in that rail that I am questioning. I'm guessing it is there to allow quick access from the pilothouse door to the dock through the gate.
It is probably a good idea...

Maybe this way I will be boating into my 70's and beyond too?
Bruce
I seldom use my pilothouse door for dock access. But every now and then I really appreciate having the door and the gate in the railing.

Click image for larger version

Name:	20160129_120529.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	181.5 KB
ID:	51999

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 07:22 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
waddenkruiser's Avatar
 
City: Southern Baltic
Country: Europe
Vessel Name: Sømarken
Vessel Model: AMS 40'
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 183
We have rails all around, one rail gate on each side close to the pilot house doors and one rail gate at stern, again close to the aft cabin door. All three rail gates we use regularly for dock access depending on docking situation.
Under rough sea condition we never use the pilot house side doors to access the deck. We step out the aft cabins door and pick the life belt into the life line on the deck. Walking then from stern to bow we don't want to miss the side rail: it is good to have rails for both hands (rail at cabin roof and side rail) on a rolling power boat.
I never missed a robust side rail when I was sailing. The sail boat was not rolling so much in a beam sea like a power boat.
In addition the side rails give much safety in any docking situation / being in a lock etc. when it is necessary to handle the lines and fenders on the narrow side deck.
I don't want to miss them.


best regards / med venlig hilsen
wadden
__________________
best regards / med venlig hilsen
Wadden
waddenkruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 07:25 AM   #34
Guru
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Country: US
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,409
Quote:
Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
I seldom use my pilothouse door for dock access. But every now and then I really appreciate having the door and the gate in the railing.

Attachment 51999

Ted
Ted
Good illustration of my point.
We've tied to much higher walls and exiting w/o gate was a real adventure trying to get by the cockpit roof.
Bacchus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2016, 08:26 AM   #35
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,980
Railing can sometimes seem to be in the way and railing can avoid injury as well as safe a life.

IMHO

When positioning/placing railing on a boat the simple equation is: How many times will that railing get in the way as a simple bother/annoyance, and, are there times when that railing can/could/will avoid serious injury or possibly save a life?

One injury diverted and surely one life saved allows me to become crystal clear in regard to where I want railing on my boat[s].

Regarding railing "gates" at salon or pilot door entries and in the transom area. Seems to me that simple, single hinged, rest-stop, top-bar railing piece 2'6" to 3' long is the easiest answer. No muss no fuss. When opened, laying on the top bar it is completely out of the way and closed onto its rest stop it becomes part of the top-bar. Depending on needs the hinged area can be fore or aft on side railing and port or starboard on the transom. What also works well on some locations of railing "gates" is chain with quick clips on both ends and receiving holes on each sides stanchion.

All gate designs mentioned should have a sturdy railing stanchion on both sides.

Over decades of boating I have no way of counting the many times that railings have surely diverted injury for some person (me included) on any one of my boats. I am pretty sure that my brother's life may have been saved by the bow rail one time in a really big storm. Injuries diverted and potential of life saved = Railings (and hand holds) every where feasible on a boat... that's the way I see and play it!

Happy Railing-Placement Daze! - Art
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 06:49 AM   #36
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,525
"(and hand holds) every where feasible on a boat..."

Especially inside , as crashing into a bulkhead is much unfun.

Below frequently one can not anticipate the "big" ones that may come while anchored!
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 07:11 AM   #37
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,275
There is an offshoot of this conversation on my Test drive post with an interesting comment by a former American Tug 395 owner in post number 4.
Wish it had been made here for continuity but...
Bruce

American Tug 395 "Test Drive" video!
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 07:24 AM   #38
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
There is an offshoot of this conversation on my Test drive post with an interesting comment by a former American Tug 395 owner in post number 4.
Wish it had been made here for continuity but...
Bruce

American Tug 395 "Test Drive" video!
As per the link's troubles mentioned: In addition to our Tolly's full railing complement there are also easily walkable side decks for 360 degree access around the boat.
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 07:28 AM   #39
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art View Post
As per the link's troubles mentioned: In addition to our Tolly's full railing complement there are also easily walkable side decks for 360 degree access around the boat.
That would be helpful if we were looking at those boats, we however, have our hearts set on the American Tug...
I really don't yet know how we will approach this.
Bruce
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2016, 08:44 AM   #40
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
That would be helpful if we were looking at those boats, we however, have our hearts set on the American Tug...
I really don't yet know how we will approach this.
Bruce
Tollycraft construction, comfort, seaworthy items might surprise you... maybe you should take a look at a couple Tollys. Unfortunately, there may not be too many in RI for review. YachtWorld usually has plenty of Tollys offered for review.

Best Luck!
__________________

Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012