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Old 11-02-2014, 08:57 PM   #21
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Up here in Southern Southeast Alaska one with a private pleasure boat will not be able to "Request an inspection" from the U.S.CG. They push it off on the U.S.CG aux of which there is not one. However, if stopped on the water they will board. All well and fine, however the thinking on "When" remains a head shaker.

The fellow I sold our boat too required a Coast Guard inspection for insurance, (Corrected by Pete who provided coverage) The Coast Guard would as stated, do this inspection so the owner "trolled" the boat by the local Coast Guard station just begging them to come out and inspect. Nata, Nit, Noway!!! Such is life.
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Old 11-03-2014, 04:02 PM   #22
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I looked at Bodega bay when I was coming up and it looked hairy so I shot for Eureka or Crescent City, with the latter being better. A PFD can't save your life if it is sitting in a cabinet somewhere, it should be on anytime the boat is underway.
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Old 11-03-2014, 04:33 PM   #23
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Or certainly when conditions or the operation/situation warrant one.

For some that may be all the time.

Also ease of access and donning play into the decision.
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Old 11-03-2014, 06:03 PM   #24
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I looked at Bodega bay when I was coming up and it looked hairy so I shot for Eureka or Crescent City, with the latter being better
I'm curious as to what led you to that conclusion. Locals would consider BB the easiest, just no shortcuts inside the rock when seas are running. The large fleet inside of commercial and rec fishing boats and sailboats are on the small side, boat-size wise.
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Old 11-03-2014, 07:32 PM   #25
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I learned today that my buddy Seon, who I crabbed with last year in his boat Reel Kahuna out of Bodega Bay had capsized in August while salmon fishing. Here are some pics and his first hand report of the event. Amazing!









Some may have heard that the FV Reel Kahuna was capsized yesterday several hundred yards south of the Bodega Rock Island aka Seal Island. I had Belden Bill and Kevster Kevin as my crew, both very knowledgeable fishermen.

We’ve been fishing south of the island for a little over an hours with gentle rolling swells then approximately 9:30 am when suddenly a 10’-12’“sneaker wave” appeared out of no where approximately 50 yard from us swamping the vessel. I was seated at the helm but couldn’t react quickly enough to turn and gun the motor full throttle. The wave hit with such a force that it capsized the vessel towards the starboard side in a blink of an eye.

The house filled instantly as I was knocked against the starboard side of the house. Holding my breath, I up righted myself trying to locate the back of the house to be able to swim out. I felt the VHF radio and swam to my right but was thrown back towards my left, slamming me against the windshield, probably due to another wave hitting the boat. I felt the radio again then frantically swam toward my right. It seemed forever but I was able to feel the rocket launcher bar then with all my might, I pulled myself out of the house to surface at the stern of the capsized boat.

After several seconds grasping for air, I located Kevin at the bow of the overturned vessel and Bill mid-ship with his face covered with blood. I asked and was answered by each that they were all right.
A passing open bow boat with two fishermen apparently witnesses the incident and was at our side immediately and was able to pull Bill out first then Kevin and I climbed on board.
The skipper of that boat headed back to the Coast Guard station at full throttle, even ignoring the 5 mph speed limit at Doran ramp area. We were met near the station’s dock where the CG boat was headed towards the accident. We transferred onto to their vessel where the EMT immediately rendered first aid to Bill. Once on shore an ambulance was waiting to transport Bill to the hospital while Kevin and I stayed to give our report.

I learned later that Bill has a gash on his forehead and the bridge of his nose along with a cut lip but is recovering well in the hospital over night and plan to be home today.

The CG towed the boat back to Doran ramp where a salvage company from Sausalito worked over almost three hours to upright the boat.

Fortunately PFD a MUST WEAR rule on my boat and we were all wearing our auto inflate PFD and each deployed instantly. Had we not, we wouldn’t have had time to locate and slip one on.

At this point, one could speculate on what we “should of, would have, or could have” but wouldn’t change the fact that the incident happened and that Bill, Kevin and I alive and to fish another day.
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Old 11-05-2014, 02:34 AM   #26
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Can't get the pictures to open up

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
I learned today that my buddy Seon, who I crabbed with last year in his boat Reel Kahuna out of Bodega Bay had capsized in August while salmon fishing. Here are some pics and his first hand report of the event. Amazing!









Some may have heard that the FV Reel Kahuna was capsized yesterday several hundred yards south of the Bodega Rock Island aka Seal Island. I had Belden Bill and Kevster Kevin as my crew, both very knowledgeable fishermen.

We’ve been fishing south of the island for a little over an hours with gentle rolling swells then approximately 9:30 am when suddenly a 10’-12’“sneaker wave” appeared out of no where approximately 50 yard from us swamping the vessel. I was seated at the helm but couldn’t react quickly enough to turn and gun the motor full throttle. The wave hit with such a force that it capsized the vessel towards the starboard side in a blink of an eye.

The house filled instantly as I was knocked against the starboard side of the house. Holding my breath, I up righted myself trying to locate the back of the house to be able to swim out. I felt the VHF radio and swam to my right but was thrown back towards my left, slamming me against the windshield, probably due to another wave hitting the boat. I felt the radio again then frantically swam toward my right. It seemed forever but I was able to feel the rocket launcher bar then with all my might, I pulled myself out of the house to surface at the stern of the capsized boat.

After several seconds grasping for air, I located Kevin at the bow of the overturned vessel and Bill mid-ship with his face covered with blood. I asked and was answered by each that they were all right.
A passing open bow boat with two fishermen apparently witnesses the incident and was at our side immediately and was able to pull Bill out first then Kevin and I climbed on board.
The skipper of that boat headed back to the Coast Guard station at full throttle, even ignoring the 5 mph speed limit at Doran ramp area. We were met near the station’s dock where the CG boat was headed towards the accident. We transferred onto to their vessel where the EMT immediately rendered first aid to Bill. Once on shore an ambulance was waiting to transport Bill to the hospital while Kevin and I stayed to give our report.

I learned later that Bill has a gash on his forehead and the bridge of his nose along with a cut lip but is recovering well in the hospital over night and plan to be home today.

The CG towed the boat back to Doran ramp where a salvage company from Sausalito worked over almost three hours to upright the boat.

Fortunately PFD a MUST WEAR rule on my boat and we were all wearing our auto inflate PFD and each deployed instantly. Had we not, we wouldn’t have had time to locate and slip one on.

At this point, one could speculate on what we “should of, would have, or could have” but wouldn’t change the fact that the incident happened and that Bill, Kevin and I alive and to fish another day.
What kind of boat were they on.
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Old 11-05-2014, 01:21 PM   #27
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Do you think these folks would be alive today if they wore PFDs?
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Old 11-05-2014, 01:33 PM   #28
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Greetings,
Mr. FW's contribution brings up a question. Manual or self inflating PFD's? I went to a demo one time and the presenter mentioned HE preferred a full manual inflation type unit. He mentioned a possibility of being trapped in an overturned vessel IF the PFD self inflated before the wearer could extricate themselves to the "outside". Thoughts please?
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Old 11-05-2014, 01:49 PM   #29
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Funny, as one ages the thoughts of safety become more prevalent or so it seems. Been on and around the water all of my life. Most likely given a moment, could count the times in my years where I purposely wore a life jacket. Never though about the danger and most likely took the shock view of "How long would one last anyway" thinking. Actually recall laughing at all the rigmarole that those with safety in mind when to. I'd guess up to my current acquisition, a boat with narrow side decks and no side doors the thought of safety to that degree became apparent.
A few years back when the new inflatable narrow tubed vest first showed up on visiting yachts did I take note. Still I chuckled as watching the "Visitors" particularly the men, walking about with these funny little thing ma jiggers around their necks.
Now that the age factor has hit and I realize I am human and subject to doing stupid or having unfortunate chance, that personal safty is a subject.
Yes, I have purchased these "Funny Little Vest" for myself, wife, and visiting guest. In addition I have a standing order that anybody going beyond the aft cockpit will have one of these or a certified float coat on and zipped.
Good feeling.
New habits for an old "Five and Dimer".

Cheers,
Al
Al good post and if you want to find out why a PFD is a good idea go down to the harbor in K town and jump in ... preferably w a PFD. The shock of that cold water will amaze you. Don't do it unless your heart ect is up to it.
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Old 11-05-2014, 01:52 PM   #30
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Well in Flywright's story the guy with the serious gash could have just as easily been knocked unconscious. If conscious and trapped at least there is a chance that you could take it off and get out. If unconscious and thrown from the boat I'd hope for an automatic deployment.
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Old 11-05-2014, 02:37 PM   #31
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Eric, On several occasions that has been the case. The last was to wrestle a line out of the wheel. Down to shorts and in!! Used the wife's serrated knife for what seemed to be record in line removal!!.
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Old 11-05-2014, 03:25 PM   #32
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Greetings,
Mr. FW's contribution brings up a question. Manual or self inflating PFD's? I went to a demo one time and the presenter mentioned HE preferred a full manual inflation type unit. He mentioned a possibility of being trapped in an overturned vessel IF the PFD self inflated before the wearer could extricate themselves to the "outside". Thoughts please?
Having worn inflatable type preservers since 1979 (military aviation) and had them on inside of objects that could wind up in the water unexpectedly...

I would love one that you could safety when appropriate...but alas those would not meet USCG regs as they would require training and common sense.

So the best alternative is auto inflate as the vast majority of the time you would need one you would probably be outside anyway...unless you are one to always wear one when inside a cabin.

Boating as I know it and boaters that I know would benefit much greater frm auto as they rarely wear one indoors and therefore the auto is a greater asset than threat.
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Old 11-05-2014, 03:44 PM   #33
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. I would think if the weather was snotty enough, suggesting peril, we would be wearing PFD's in the pilot house. I NEVER go looking for bad weather but if caught out...
I fully appreciate the possibility of being knocked unconscious and therein lies the conundrum.
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Old 11-05-2014, 04:13 PM   #34
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Greetings,
Mr. FW's contribution brings up a question. Manual or self inflating PFD's? I went to a demo one time and the presenter mentioned HE preferred a full manual inflation type unit. He mentioned a possibility of being trapped in an overturned vessel IF the PFD self inflated before the wearer could extricate themselves to the "outside". Thoughts please?
Well, your choices are a traditional vest or an inflatable. It seems in your scenario that both types present the same problem.

I'm sure there is a problem scenario for every type of vest, so it comes down to maximizing your chance of survival across a whole range of scenarios. Air bags are no different. Yes, they can kick your ass when they go off, but on the whole you are way better off with them than without.
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Old 11-05-2014, 07:49 PM   #35
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. I would think if the weather was snotty enough, suggesting peril, we would be wearing PFD's in the pilot house. I NEVER go looking for bad weather but if caught out...
I fully appreciate the possibility of being knocked unconscious and therein lies the conundrum.
I follow but not really...

If the weather is snotty and you are inside....how are you going to need a life jacket unless going in the water?

If you are inside...the only way you are going in the water is if the bilge is full to the main deck or you roll over.

If you roll over and start to sink...as been said...do you want an auto on? or even...most people in a rollover become so disoriented...the probability of getting trapped and drowning even with a manual on is pretty high.

If you are just sinking...alarm abandon ship..everyone grab their strategically placed PFD, don it and proceed to the point of disembarkation.

Unless you are a well trained, physically fit crew...exiting a cabin full of water and rapidly sinking from a rollover is pretty iffy...especially if the water is below 60 degrees and takes your breath away quickly....

My suggestion is just buy autos and leave them hanging by the door...if the weather gets snotty enough that a rollover is possible...chances are you are pretty well set in one position hanging on and the life jacket should be next to you.

I also believe in having the autos to wear when working out on deck...but also standard offshore jackets in a bag on the flying bridge. If conditions warrant, they can be brought down or left to surface in case of a rollover.

But again...I see myself in the water in a few situations where the auto wins hands down.

That may not be for everyone...but considering what I do and have done around the water...it would take a lot to convince me otherwise...certainly WAY more than an auto inflating inside a cabin in the 1:1,000,000 chance of my boat rolling over.

I see the greatest threat to an old trawler like mine being a fire more than flooding and certainly with good seamanship a rollover.

Then again I'm not taking my tub for serious bluewater...but I still think my reasoning holds....
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Old 11-05-2014, 07:58 PM   #36
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You all have convinced me. I will jump into the gumby suit.
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Old 11-05-2014, 08:44 PM   #37
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I am waiting for the next new controversial thread..

"Do you wear a PFD at all times or not?"




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Old 11-05-2014, 09:02 PM   #38
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Both these stories sure do argue for wearing a PDF all the time. When I imagine my boat sinking, I typically think of a slowish process of taking on water and a controlled process of donning jackets, gumby suits, depliying raft, grabbing ditch bag, etc. Oh, and a boat that remains more or less trim during the whole process.

It's likely none of that is reality. These stories show how fast you can find yourself in the water with no boat around you.
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Old 11-05-2014, 09:38 PM   #39
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In my experience in dealing with hundreds of sinkers....and reviewing hundreds more....most sinkings usually do occur relatively slowly...in fact most never get to the full blown sunk stage as many are self induced that self correct.

The engine pumps the bilge full of water till the engine dies...or the boat is slogging though slop taking on water till the engine dies or the captain gives up and changes course...

If you regularly run breaking inlets or are a blue water type...then sure your chances of a rollover are much better than an ICW type.

But they are even pretty rare compared to the average sinking in all of the boating community....think of how a boat sinks (wooden boats excluded)...how is it going to happen fast?

Only occasionally is a skipper so unaware of his boat that they take on enough water and the skipper allows the conditions to become right for the free surface effect to roll the boat. Many commercial rollovers are usually because of unsecured gear or cargo.
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Old 11-05-2014, 09:39 PM   #40
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Children should have PFDs whenever on deck, regardless of the height of railings on a boat.

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