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Old 08-13-2017, 01:25 PM   #1
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Boats, a sentimental attachment?

The question may surprise you but here is the background. When I bought my boat, it was an heartbreaking event for the PO. He was thinking that I was not really interested in at the beginning and when it was time to take ownership he realized it was the last day he would own it which was very sentimental moment. Recently a guy at the marina sold his boat, he was old and it was time for him to turn the page. Even if he told me that it was enough and he wanted to do something else, today when the new owners came to finalize the selling and he realized it was the last time he would be here, it was again very sentimental.
I imagine the same for me, I only own it for 2 years now but I put so much of myself in it that it is a special relationship and I would be very sad to loose it.

What about you? Is your boat a consumable, just an object, or do you have more of a special relationship with her?

L.
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Old 08-13-2017, 01:56 PM   #2
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We owned our last boat for 14 years. Our three children grew up with that boat, with many nights in the Abacos and at anchor on weekends.

We eventually donated it to the Safe Harbor boys home. When they came to get it we helped them to the lock where we got off. We were both in tears as she disappeared around the corner.

So yes. It was very emotional for us. We still had the memories, but the source of them had left.
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Old 08-13-2017, 01:57 PM   #3
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The question may surprise you but here is the background. When I bought my boat, it was an heartbreaking event for the PO. He was thinking that I was not really interested in at the beginning and when it was time to take ownership he realized it was the last day he would own it which was very sentimental moment. Recently a guy at the marina sold his boat, he was old and it was time for him to turn the page. Even if he told me that it was enough and he wanted to do something else, today when the new owners came to finalize the selling and he realized it was the last time he would be here, it was again very sentimental.
I imagine the same for me, I only own it for 2 years now but I put so much of myself in it that it is a special relationship and I would be very sad to loose it.

What about you? Is your boat a consumable, just an object, or do you have more of a special relationship with her?

L.
What does PO stand for??
Police Officer
Post Office
Print Out
Purchase Order
??
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:00 PM   #4
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What does PO stand for??
Police Officer
Post Office
Print Out
Purchase Order
??
Quite simply PREVIOUS OWNER
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:00 PM   #5
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:06 PM   #6
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I've installed 9 years of my life into my rebuild, I hope my son takes it on when I am done.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:25 PM   #7
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I've installed 9 years of my life into my rebuild, I hope my son takes it on when I am done.
That great feeling does you credit
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:33 PM   #8
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I used to have a Sea Ray 330 Sundancer. We were out one beautiful night just drifting on the Columbia River, with all the nav lights on and the cockpit well let.


We were hit by a BUI boater, the boat was totaled and I was paid off by my insurance company.


When that all happened I had a strange emotion, leaving me to feel like I had a child injured and I had somehow let her down. When they came to haul her away I had more than one tear in my eye.


Yes, there is a sentimental attachment.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:48 PM   #9
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I think most of us are NOT attached to our boats as the mechanical contraptions that they are. I believe most of us ARE attached to the memories we have created in and on those contraptions.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:52 PM   #10
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I feel that the longer I own a boat, the more of myself I pour into the boat and the more the boat becomes part of my personality. Unlike a car or an RV or an airplane and more like a pet dog, a boat takes on part of us and give some of itself back to us.
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Old 08-13-2017, 03:01 PM   #11
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I have had some boats that were part of great adventures and memories , some quite special that will never be forgotten. Similarly we have had homes and to a lesser extent cars/trucks that were parts of great memories as unique parts of our lives.
Very feel very fortunate that boats , homes and cars played roles in these memories and are thankful for those experiences.
But the object itself is not something we get emotional about even of its been part of the adventure for many years - the people are what generate the emotions and attachments.
YMMV
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:05 PM   #12
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I had a similar experience with the PO of my boat: The sale was sans brokers, so we got to know each other during the buying process. An informal condition of the sale - suggested several times by the PO - was that they'd spend time with me on the boat to do a system orientation and answer any questions I had. Unfortunately, the PO was so emotional during the event that I felt I was torturing him, and I didn't benefit much from it. I later arranged with the yard that prepared my boat for the delivery trip to have one of their employees most familiar with my boat to accomplish the same thing, and that worked out well.

I haven't had the boat long enough to develop similar attachments. It's a love/hate relationship at this point. Some days there's nothing I'd rather own, be doing, or a have in our future. Other days I question my sanity and wonder if I'll ever be rid of it. The happy thoughts far outweigh the grim - so far.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:23 PM   #13
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Love affair depth with boats, cars or other useful material objects are generated by the lovely times that occur in life during days, months, years of ownership.

Point in fact: Dad sold his 17' cabin cruiser o/b boat and purchased 1948 23' Chris Craft Express cabin cruiser when I was about 5 yrs. old. Our family had looked at many boats before locating that Chris. We owned it and used it very often till I was about 13. During that 8 yr. time span, in addition to many adventures aboard that Chris [sometimes our family of five spending up to 4 summer weeks aboard during Dad's vacations] I grew up working with Dad on that boat. Yes, we loved that Chris!

When we sold the 1948 Chris [simply because our family out grew it] there was sadness in our family; even though Dad had already purchased a nice 31' boat as replacement.

The 31 footer for reasons just could not generate our love for it. It was replaced the very next year with a 38' raised deck sport-fisher with flying bridge. That boat was our next love affair due to many great times aboard over a span of 11 years. She was a woody, but, built like a destroyer! Hope she still floats and is cared for some place in New England.

Wife and I love the times we have aboard our Tollycraft boat; 9 years so far with no sale-plan on the horizon [see avatar]. We love the boat cause we love the times aboard and it is a cool, comfortable, "well behaved" mid sized Pleasure Craft.

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Old 08-13-2017, 05:39 PM   #14
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I think most of us are NOT attached to our boats as the mechanical contraptions that they are. I believe most of us ARE attached to the memories we have created in and on those contraptions.
Absolutely. It's not the boat, it's the life with it, the memories and experiences. Then in the case of PO's mentioned above I think it was the loss of a part of their lives, the realization their boating days were over. That has to be a horrible sensation to realize "no more", that one won't be getting out on the water today or this week or this month or this ever. We'll feel some sense of loss when we sell any boat, but it's the last one that will be toughest.
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:16 AM   #15
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I think most of us are NOT attached to our boats as the mechanical contraptions that they are. I believe most of us ARE attached to the memories we have created in and on those contraptions.
We bought our current boat prior to selling our previous boat. The new boat was a big upgrade, and the stress of potentially owning two boats was somewhat high.

However, driving away from the closing of the sale of the previous boat, my wife started crying. Not from relief or joy, but sadness. I've boated my entire life. She has not. We spent 10 years with that boat. In her teary words "All of my boating firsts were on that boat".
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Old 08-14-2017, 03:28 PM   #16
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I think vessels are like an ex-wife.

You always remember them. All the good times and oh yeah all the bad times!!!


Cheers.

H.
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Old 08-14-2017, 05:37 PM   #17
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Think a lot depends on how much sweat equity you have invested. If all you do is write the checks, it's probably tough to get attached to it.

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Old 08-14-2017, 05:48 PM   #18
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Think a lot depends on how much sweat equity you have invested. If all you do is write the checks, it's probably tough to get attached to it.

Ted


Indeed, and that is where I make a distinction between a "vulgar" object that you can pay for and sell or throw away, and something you invest your time and personality in.

L
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:54 PM   #19
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Think a lot depends on how much sweat equity you have invested. If all you do is write the checks, it's probably tough to get attached to it.

Ted
Have you tried both "sides" (sweat versus dollars) and felt a noticeable difference?
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Old 08-14-2017, 07:13 PM   #20
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Have you tried both "sides" (sweat versus dollars) and felt a noticeable difference?


Well I could buy and sell something but I would never been able to monetize the heart I put in some other things.

L
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