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Old 10-17-2015, 02:41 PM   #101
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Thanks again, I get all excited based on solid comments above and then I read something like this on another forum and wonder what everyone else knows about a 33 Viking that I don't know, and is the Ford Edsel of boats?

"The 33 (Viking) was the short lived first shot at fiberglass construction,"

For reference the context of that posting is here, post #15 Viking Owners a Special Breed? - Viking Yacht | YachtForums: The World’s Largest Yachting Community

You can see why a first time buyer gets concerned about ever pulling the trigger. Am I reading something out of context? Trying to do my diligence. Thoughts?
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Old 10-17-2015, 04:38 PM   #102
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Thanks again, I get all excited based on solid comments above and then I read something like this on another forum and wonder what everyone else knows about a 33 Viking that I don't know, and is the Ford Edsel of boats?

"The 33 (Viking) was the short lived first shot at fiberglass construction,"

For reference the context of that posting is here, post #15 Viking Owners a Special Breed? - Viking Yacht | YachtForums: The World’s Largest Yachting Community

You can see why a first time buyer gets concerned about ever pulling the trigger. Am I reading something out of context? Trying to do my diligence. Thoughts?
I wouldn't call it an Edsel and, if I did, I might remind you that from what I've read, the Edsel was actually a good car, just no popularity.

In the case of the 33' Viking, to me it's like any boat of it's time period. So much was new. Some have endured the years incredibly well. Others not so well due largely to neglect. They're not going to perform like later boats as there's continuing knowledge gained and improvement in design. However, that doesn't mean they're bad boats. It would just take a good survey to evaluate it. There are quite a few available so probably some nice and some not so nice.
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Old 10-17-2015, 05:39 PM   #103
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Thanks again, I get all excited based on solid comments above and then I read something like this on another forum and wonder what everyone else knows about a 33 Viking that I don't know, and is the Ford Edsel of boats?

"The 33 (Viking) was the short lived first shot at fiberglass construction,"

For reference the context of that posting is here, post #15 Viking Owners a Special Breed? - Viking Yacht | YachtForums: The World’s Largest Yachting Community

You can see why a first time buyer gets concerned about ever pulling the trigger. Am I reading something out of context? Trying to do my diligence. Thoughts?
The following quote from forum link listed above is as I recall wooden Viking boats during their inception in the 1960's. I clearly recall while working in LI, NY boat yards on Vikings when young... They were designed beautifully but constructed very poorly. Since then... from what I understand... Viking has become a very well constructed, highly reputable boat brand. I currently know one Viking owner of what I believe is a decade or so old 44' sport fisher - he loves it!

Quote from link: "Viking has come a long way from the poorly built wooden boats they built to their early fiberglass models that aged badly with their rotten cored foredecks, cockpits, bridge decks and wood grain sole complete with sliding glass doors. I think I have surveyed most of those over the decades.

Modern Vikings are second to none in quality, fit, and finish, as is their customer service."
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Old 11-08-2015, 05:30 PM   #104
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I have really enjoyed this thread and what was very apparent to me is that there is such a vast spectrum of boating experience represented on this forum. Everyone has their list of "must haves" or "won't tolerate" and each list is probably right for them and only them. One guy's list is for the perfect loop boat. Another has a list of requirements that looks like he wants to build the largest, most comfortable boat that could ever transverse the loop. Another guy has a dock and his greatest need is to put a boat on it, which is the kind of attitude that I appreciate. It was that kind of zeal that caught me up in this lifestyle in the first place. That kind of passion is why people who cruise and people who long to own trawlers believe that boating is such a great lifestyle.
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Old 11-08-2015, 06:22 PM   #105
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Agree with Bayview 100%. Personally I can't imagine going out and buying a boat for extended cruising and live aboard without having spent a fair amount of time on the water in different sizes and types. If one hasn't done this through ownership or having lots of friends to cruise with, then charter. I've written extensively on this on other threads.

Though for our personal purposes, we bought a big whale of a boat to be our house and cruising platform, I still think Skipper Bob's maxim is spot on: " Don't buy the biggest boat you can afford, buy the smallest boat you can be comfortable in" . We did look at 67 footers. Our boat served its purpose wonderfully, for us for the 6 years we lived on her and cruised her, as time went by we liked it better and better.

The point on volume is an important one. Big differences in the same length. Below is a picture of our boat, transoms even, next to a 55' Fleming. I've been on Flemings and think they would be wonderful to be underway in. For us the perfect boat would be a "transformer", a Fleming underway, our boat at anchor or otherwise at rest. For us the living accommodations and engine room of the Fleming were unacceptable.

So obviously I think it is very important to know what your personal check list is of ergonomic, comfort and sea handling issues.

I am curious to learn of your experience with your Hatteras. My dream is to get back to the boating lifestyle in the next couple years and that size Hatteras makes some sense for me. My experience has been going up and down the ICW on Taiwanese cruisers, a 49' Albin and a 43' Marine Trader. That was about all I could afford, but I equipped each with everything needed to be a coastal cruiser. What I liked about the Marine Trader was space. I'm sure your Hatteras had even more room and that appeals to me at this point in my life. I am now 68 and retired.

With the Taiwanese boats you had to be careful with leaking fuel tanks, soft decks, and blistering. Each of those could kill you if you got a lemon. Does Hatteras generally have the same issues on those items. Were there other things of major concern that I might look to avoid?

And how was your boat in crappy seas? No one chooses to go out in rough weather, but if you cruise you are going to get caught out there at times. Was there a lot of roll? Are stabilizers a must? They are heavier boats than what I am used to, so that has to help. My hope is to find a comfortable boat that will get me north once per year and get me south when it starts to get cold.

What advise would you give for someone considering this boat, for example?

1985 Hatteras 56 Motor Yacht Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

I would greatly appreciate your thoughts and advise if you have some time. Thank you in advance
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Old 11-10-2015, 06:57 PM   #106
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I might can give you a little since ours is a Hatteras. The 56 wide body is a huge vessel. Its limiting factor is docking. Not every slip can accommodate a 18'6" beam. Lots of windage to deal with but very heavy. Docking with two people will be a challenge. There might be as many as 4 Air conditioners (maintenance). Fuel economy isnt too bad, maybe 1 gal/mile (for the size its good). If you entertain guest its very spaceous. Bow thruster is a plus. In the ICW you might need to watch out for shallow spots but doable. Hatteras yachts are known for soft bow pulpits. Its fixable then its done if it hadnt gotten too far gone. In sea conditions stabilizers are nice. The fly bridge is so high off the water it amplifies the rolling motion. Its so heavy it will plow through 4-5 footers with ease. Cleaning a large vessel like this will be a monumental task. My 43 is bad enough. The storage deck will house a large dinghy as you can see the 14' Boston Whaler. Very nice for sight seeing. I would love to live on this huge boat but not want to maintain it. Lots of people are downsizing to the forties. I'm going to a sail boat if possible. Check ours out. No pressure , Ha

1985 Hatteras 43 Motor Yacht Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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Old 11-10-2015, 07:42 PM   #107
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Magnawake mentioned a couple of things I want to emphasize. If I was buying a Hatteras MY, old, new, any size, I would want bow thrusters and stabilizers of some type. All that I've been on have needed them. Now for the type cruising you intend as well as anchoring and docking perhaps you can get by without the stabilizers, but that wouldn't be something I'd suggest. The bow thrusters are absolute though.
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Old 11-10-2015, 08:38 PM   #108
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Thats Georges old boat so I bet he can enlighten us on whats its like. I bet you George would drive that big thing anywhere he wants without a bow thruster. Just a guess though. Some people want a thruster on a 43 MY. I have never needed it even when the wind is honking. I just cant see behind me so thats the limiting factor.
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Old 11-11-2015, 07:23 PM   #109
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I might can give you a little since ours is a Hatteras. The 56 wide body is a huge vessel. Its limiting factor is docking. Not every slip can accommodate a 18'6" beam. Lots of windage to deal with but very heavy. Docking with two people will be a challenge. There might be as many as 4 Air conditioners (maintenance). Fuel economy isnt too bad, maybe 1 gal/mile (for the size its good). If you entertain guest its very spaceous. Bow thruster is a plus. In the ICW you might need to watch out for shallow spots but doable. Hatteras yachts are known for soft bow pulpits. Its fixable then its done if it hadnt gotten too far gone. In sea conditions stabilizers are nice. The fly bridge is so high off the water it amplifies the rolling motion. Its so heavy it will plow through 4-5 footers with ease. Cleaning a large vessel like this will be a monumental task. My 43 is bad enough. The storage deck will house a large dinghy as you can see the 14' Boston Whaler. Very nice for sight seeing. I would love to live on this huge boat but not want to maintain it. Lots of people are downsizing to the forties. I'm going to a sail boat if possible. Check ours out. No pressure , Ha

1985 Hatteras 43 Motor Yacht Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
Thank you for the information. You caught my attention when you reminded me of the cleaning. I was hoping reduced cruising would help me get by with maintenance, but you are right, can't avoid the constant cleaning, etc. I am several months away from making the jump, but I also appreciate the info on your 43'.
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Old 11-11-2015, 07:27 PM   #110
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Thats Georges old boat so I bet he can enlighten us on whats its like. I bet you George would drive that big thing anywhere he wants without a bow thruster. Just a guess though. Some people want a thruster on a 43 MY. I have never needed it even when the wind is honking. I just cant see behind me so thats the limiting factor.
As my crew ages, the thruster becomes more and more beneficial. There is the Captain blaming the crew already. Never had a thruster myself, but I can see many benefits. Also never had the stabilizers. Does that ever sound nice!
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Old 11-11-2015, 08:00 PM   #111
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Thank you for the information. You caught my attention when you reminded me of the cleaning. I was hoping reduced cruising would help me get by with maintenance, but you are right, can't avoid the constant cleaning, etc. I am several months away from making the jump, but I also appreciate the info on your 43'.
Very, very nice boat! Similar in many ways (design-wise) with the 43' Marine Trader that I had. I am curious about the differences between the boats. The Marine Trader has similar space, but I see the dry weight for the Marine Trader is 27,500 compared to the 34,500 for the Hatteras. The MT lists a abeam of 14'11" compared to 14' for the Hat? On burning 3.5 gph @ 7.5 knots, what rpm are you at? That is very, very good. I ran 1950 rpm with my 240 Cummins and was happy with the 9.5 gph. Again, a very nice boat. I certainly would throw her into the "check this one out" category if I were close to making the jump back into this lifestyle. Thanks for your input on this.
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Old 11-13-2015, 08:07 AM   #112
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Yes, the hatteras has lots of room. However I have never seen a trawler with same room inside. We have narrow outside walkways and the large sun deck on the aft. We have a whole wicker furniture set on the Sunderland as well. It's great for entertaining and having parties. The draw back is that it's more of a challenge when docking and less room to store a dinghy. I would be crazy if I just told you the good things and not the bad. It's a give and take thing. One should never buy a trawler just for the sole reason of fuel economy. I do get 3.5-4.0 gph at 7-7.5 it's. I usually run at 1200-1300 rpm depending if I'm in a rush ha ha. The 3208 cats are great fuel sippers at less than hull speeds. A friend has a 54 defever with 3208 cats running 8-9 it's burning 6 gph. That's awesome, plus the room is incredible with a stand up engine room. That's a great boat. The 43 hat is very heavy and doesn't like to plane. Some models have. Detriots and perform a little better at high speeds. Another friend with a 46 defever has 3208 and another with a Grand Banks too. The 43 GB has considerably less room than our and if they push it gets horrible fuel economy. But it's a trawler so people relate the name to good fuel economy and long range cruising. I can't figure that out.
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Old 10-05-2016, 09:53 AM   #113
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Question Suggestions?

Hi Everyone,

My husband and I are looking at doing the loop in '18. We will be switching from sail to power. Our dream is an American or Nordic Tug but the prices might be too high for our comfort level.

So, we have done endless boat searches on Yachtworld.....we are looking for a trawler/tug style boat in the 34-36 foot range - we do not want a v-berth (had enough of that with our sailboat). We are uncertain about a flybridge and would like a full fridge (although hubby can make modifications for this after purchase).

We are Canadian so we have to keep that in mind as exchange for us right now is 30% + so in the 100,000 US range would be ok...

Have checked out all the usual suspects, Grand Banks, CHB, Marine Trader, Mainship (great but too much money).

Older doesn't scare us as we love the wood and hubby is a mechanic.

So....all boat model suggestions are welcome
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Old 10-05-2016, 10:35 AM   #114
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Hi Everyone,



My husband and I are looking at doing the loop in '18. We will be switching from sail to power. Our dream is an American or Nordic Tug but the prices might be too high for our comfort level.



So, we have done endless boat searches on Yachtworld.....we are looking for a trawler/tug style boat in the 34-36 foot range - we do not want a v-berth (had enough of that with our sailboat). We are uncertain about a flybridge and would like a full fridge (although hubby can make modifications for this after purchase).



We are Canadian so we have to keep that in mind as exchange for us right now is 30% + so in the 100,000 US range would be ok...



Have checked out all the usual suspects, Grand Banks, CHB, Marine Trader, Mainship (great but too much money).



Older doesn't scare us as we love the wood and hubby is a mechanic.



So....all boat model suggestions are welcome

Welcome. You may want to start a new thread with your own questions.

Unsure of what you mean by a V berth. The NT and AT in that size have a forward cabin with the berth in the bow. They aren't entirely rectangular but aren't the severe V berths that we are used to from our sailboats.

If the price of those is putting you off you may want to look at North Pacific or Helmsman. Much more boat for the dollar although the used boats I believe start at the 39' size.
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Old 10-05-2016, 04:55 PM   #115
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Hi Everyone,

My husband and I are looking at doing the loop in '18. We will be switching from sail to power. Our dream is an American or Nordic Tug but the prices might be too high for our comfort level.

So, we have done endless boat searches on Yachtworld.....we are looking for a trawler/tug style boat in the 34-36 foot range - we do not want a v-berth (had enough of that with our sailboat). We are uncertain about a flybridge and would like a full fridge (although hubby can make modifications for this after purchase).

We are Canadian so we have to keep that in mind as exchange for us right now is 30% + so in the 100,000 US range would be ok...

Have checked out all the usual suspects, Grand Banks, CHB, Marine Trader, Mainship (great but too much money).

Older doesn't scare us as we love the wood and hubby is a mechanic.

So....all boat model suggestions are welcome
Perhaps a great topic for your own thread and while you've shared some, perhaps tell us a bit more about yourselves and your goals. How much time would you spend on the boat? How many guests? Other than the loop, any plans? Flybridge is something only you can decide. We like spending the time outside while looping. How much cooking on board vs. restaurants? Docks or anchoring? Importance of style vs. function? Where do you intend to keep the boat?

If you're very kind to one, a moderator would probably be willing to split this out into a thread for you. Just hit the report button on your post and ask them.
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Old 10-17-2016, 12:53 AM   #116
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Winnowing down...

I have narrowed the entire YW inventory on the West Coast (San Diego to AK) to about 12 boats... I would like to avoid having to travel to look at each individual boat for the purposes of rank-ordering the options (would cost $thousands...). How do I know whether or not a boat in Seattle would be better for my needs than a boat in San Diego? (Without actually going to see both...) Do local TF folks ever get paid to assess boats for other members out-of-area?

Even a 1 or 2-minute glance at these listings, and a gut reaction (i.e. "that one looks good, get it for $____ and see how it surveys, but this other one looks overpriced and problematic, so put that at the bottom") would be helpful - to the extent that one can do this just by looking at listings for a couple minutes... Or am I just hoping for too much?

I am looking for:
85% liveaboard (tied up - I have a F/T job to drive to)
10% offshore fishing (up to 30nm off the coast - salmon, etc.) *Need a fishable cockpit or aft deck, so a davit up top or on bow
5% coastal cruising (Catalina to OR)
Single M, but will be hosting 4 week-long guests a few times per year (family from Ohio) so figure 2 stateroom/2 head, 43-53' LOA
No Cummins 903's, no Volvos, otherwise flexible on power
10kt cruise, 14kt+ max
$100K-200K price range, would like to be on the lower end of that of course, but if I can get a 20-year (last) boat right now, great, I will spend the extra $$$$$ and keep her til I can no longer live aboard safely. Be nice to avoid having to "buy up" in a few years.
Will be paying in cash. Ideally in 3-4 weeks from now. Just sold the house and want to get OTW.

Anyone I can PM these 12 listings to and see what jumps out at them as special, or 'make that one last on the list'...? I could even send out a "top 6" I guess. Rather not post all 12 in the general forum.

I have a broker, just hoping for a second/independent/non-interested opinion... Thanks!
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Old 10-24-2016, 01:05 PM   #117
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As it turns out, that would have been somewhat of a goose chase. My mistake.

I have learned that seeing more boats locally - even if not the same year or builder - as long as the form factor is the same - will greatly assist in evaluating boats which may be located out of area.

I saw 4 more boats locally and was able to rule out 6 of the ones on my list.

I have made an offer on a clear top choice, and if that doesn't work, I will drive 6 hours to another port to look at 3 of the remaining top 4. If those fail to work, I will see if I can get help with one in Canada.

Hopefully the clear top choice will work out, though. Only took seeing 4 other boats. Not very difficult at all. Lesson learned.
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Old 11-01-2016, 01:41 PM   #118
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Hello Craig! Take your time as you always get for what you planned for... It took our Vessel 2 years to find us! All the best and kindest regards! Normand
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