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Old 07-28-2019, 04:25 PM   #201
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Originally Posted by smitty477 View Post
Yachtworld is one of many sources to find boats - no more or less valuable than others dependent upon your location and boat search specs.
I am sure some of the worst boats sell by word of mouth as well....
And - If you keep a close eye on Craigslist boat adds there are sometimes cherries to be had therein.

However, they may not last but a few hours of advertising... cause others have their eyes wide open too - looking for cherries!
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Old 07-28-2019, 05:57 PM   #202
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In searching for a boat, I see lots of references to Yatchworld. I've heard that some of the best boats sell by word of mouth at the marina or local area. Once it gets to Yatchworld, it is usually because it is overpriced or needs work, or both. Love Yatchworld as it makes great reading but thoughts from those who have more insight on my thinking. Thx.
That's probably true, but where do I subscribe to word of mouth? Especially across the country? Unless you live in a very target rich environment, the likelihood of finding the right boat at the right moment for you is extremely low.
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Old 08-09-2019, 06:50 PM   #203
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North Pacific 42-43 trawler

Hi,
I am searching for the good and bad on the North Pacific 42-43í trawlers.
Also, if you have one with a single Cummins, please mention mpg or gph at various speeds/rpms, and your hp.
Thanks,
Bob
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Old 08-09-2019, 07:21 PM   #204
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Lots of people can help you here.
Great boat, great company. Just purchased a new 45.
My 250 HP 45, (much like the others (~8-8.5 kts at 3 gph) depending on current etc. max cruise ~11 kts. Bigger engines give slight higher top end speed. Most cruise @ 1700/1800 between 7-8.5 kts
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Old 08-11-2019, 01:16 PM   #205
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Hi,

I am searching for the good and bad on the North Pacific 42-43í trawlers.

Also, if you have one with a single Cummins, please mention mpg or gph at various speeds/rpms, and your hp.

Thanks,

Bob

Bob, I have a 2010 NP43 that Iíve owned for 3.5 years. I bought it from the original owner through Trevor. I have been really happy with the boat.

Good:
- The layout works really well for us. My wife has retired, Iím still working. We got the NP43 because we wanted a boat that was big enough to take our family with us. We have cruised for a week with 5 adults (the two of us plus daughter, son-in-law, and son). We just finished another week with daughter, son-in-law, and 22 month old grandson).

- The boat is very quiet at cruise. We typically run at 1450 rpm burning 2.0-2.1 gph giving us 7 knots. If the hull is dirty, we wonít get that 7 knots. From 1400-1550 rpm the boat is very quiet. We do have rugs laced over the salon floor which likely helps and the PO had Trevor put a bit thicker sound insulation in the ER at build time so other NP of our vintage may not be as quiet. We have the 380hp version of the Cummins QSB 5.9L engine. The PO asked for the engine upsize when the boat was built. It is fine but the standard 330hp engine would have been more than enough power.

- The boat handles unpleasant seas well, but unpleasant seas are, well, unpleasant.
- We love the Pilothouse, rarely use the flybridge. Excellent visibility forward and to the sides.
- The electrical systems are really well designed and installed. North Pacific does a great job of labeling everything.
- Fantastic factory support, even for those of us that didnít buy new.
- The boats are well constructed and well designed. I may post a picture of my boat perched on a rock that the PO hit at high tide at speed. There was very little damage.

Less than optimal...:
- The view aft from the pilothouse is poor to none. This makes backing into slips tough unless it is done from the flybridge. We do have a camera pointed aft from the radar arch which is useful, but since we operate from the PH most of the time, we prefer to not back into slips. I would like to add another camera on the starboard side pointed aft and that would make all the difference.

- The boat is not fast. The PO says that he ran it at 10 knots most of the time and I believe him. He had lots of money to burn so never thought about the fuel cost. However, at 10 knots the boat is loud, drains your bank account, and digs a giant hole in the water. The trim tabs on our boat keep it from going too bow high, but this is not a great boat for someone that is in a hurry.

- Having a covered aft cockpit is wonderful and I consider it essential for us in the PNW.

- Really nice anchor lockers that drain outboard.

- The fuel fills are in the forward corners of the cockpit about a foot off the deck. This means that they are protect from the weather so even if the O-rings arenít replaced as they should be, or if a fuel filler cover isnít tightened down all the way, there is no way water will find its way into the fuel tanks. Furthermore, there can be no confusing between fuel and water fills as the water fills are located on the steps on either side up to the boat deck.

- Well done interior woodwork and NO exterior teak!

- There is LOTS of storage in the NP43. Our biggest issue is putting so much stuff in the boat that we forget we have it.

- The swim platform on the NP43 is spacious. I have a sailing dinghy that we often keep on the Seawise davits. When I am rigging the boat to sail, the large swim platform is great. The NP42 is the same just a foot shorter.

Nit picky things...
- The PH doors are a bit heavy with a door latch that can be uncomfortable for smaller folks to use. Changed in the North Pacific 45.

- When it is wet (just about all the time in the PNW), water will drip from the PH roof onto the PH floor if the PH doors are open. This is due to the slight angle of the PH sides. Annoying and fixed in the NP45.

- Due to the build of the swim step, if anything that has been mounted on the swim step leaks, the swim step can fill with water and the water canít really escape. That happened to us. The problem is with items that have been added by owners. In our case it was second under-the-stop swim ladder that was added and leaked over the prior 8 years. It caused the interior wood framing on the edge of the swim step to swell and the gelcoat to crack. This was present when we bought the boat. Trevor was the one who pointed it out to me at the survey (our surveyor didnít notice it despite going over the hull carefully after I showed him the photo of the boat on the rocks). Other NP 42/43 owners have had the same issue. The fix was easy and the way to avoid it is to simply make sure that if you affix something to the swim step it is done properly (butyl tape is your friend).

- The ER is fine, but it is tight. The NP43 has a full crawl around engine room space. Knee pads are a must.

- Since the NP42/43 has raked windows in the PH, it can get very warm. Not a problem with both PH doors open, but if they are closed it can get hot. We had exterior window covers made from Pfifertex which dramatically cools it down. The new design of the NP45 eliminates this issue.

- The galley table converts to a bunk. However, it is only suitable for kids as it is very short. Having said that, my 30 year old daughter who is 5í 8Ē finds it very comfortable.

- The second cabin has two ports that open for ventilation. However, in hot weather when my 6í4Ē 250+ lbs plus son-in-law and my daughter are sleeping in there, they claim it feels a bit stuffy. Likely, this would not be the case with the double bed configuration rather than the bunk bed configuration. Personally, I think that cabin is incredibly comfortable to sleep in.

- The two lockers just forward of the PH above the cabin top are very convenient for lines, power cords, etc... However, the hatches are angled with the front of the PH and are not water tight. So anything that gets put in there will get wet with enough rain. The have drains in them and I have put dry-deck tiles on the bottom so it isnít a problem, but it would be nice if they were dry.

- The aft cockpit is nice, but I which it was a bit larger. We keep a 12v freezer under the ladder to the boat deck and have a set of two teak chairs and a table that we use in the cockpit. It works but it would be nice to have a bit more space there as the aft saloon door opens out into the cockpit. The NP45 improves that with its 1í wider beam as well as the aft salon door is a slider instead of swinging out.

- We werenít real fans of the curtains that were supplied to the PO by North Pacific. We changed those out to blinds.

- The painted aluminum window trim has spots where the paint has bubbled. It isnít an issue for us, but eventually we may need to have that trim redone. That is one of the reasons why the NP45 has stainless window frames.

Other thoughts....

If you have any questions, email Trevor Brice of North Pacific Yachts. He truly is an outstanding gentleman and will be happy to answer any questions you have. He likes to keep track of the North Pacific boats out there and NP owners often use him as a broker when they want to sell or upgrade.

I couldnít be happier with my boat. Initially, I didnít consider the NP for several reasons. I wanted full walk around decks. I didnít want a flybridge. I also wasnít taken with the looks of the NP43. However, look what I ended up with. I find that I donít need full walk around decks and much prefer the extra interior space the full width saloon affords. I donít use the flybridge much, but when I do it is really nice. The looks of the NP have really grown on me. I think it is lovely now and even though it doesnít matter a bit, we get lots of complements on our boat when are out.

Despite that wall of text, Iím sure I am forgetting both positive and negatives. Every boat is a compromise but the NP43 is the best compromise for us. If I was in a position to buy a new boat, the boat I would buy is the NP45. It has all the wonderful features that we love with the NP43 and has improved upon them. From a value/dollar perspective, it is hard to beat the North Pacific either new or used.

Let me know if you have any other questions.
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Old 08-19-2019, 04:54 PM   #206
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Thank you! Sounds like a great boat!
Bob
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:31 AM   #207
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Okay, so last night Admiral and I opened some fine wine and began talking about our future boat purchase and whether to buy "older boat" or "much older boat." As you can imagine a lively discussion ensued. Since we know nothing about boats (as you can tell by our posts!), we thought, let's ask the pros. So here we are: We are looking at two boats they are both under $400K, one is a 2005 and the other is a 2013, same trawler type model, mid-thirties in length, similar equipment, single engine, the older boat has about 2500 hours, the new one 650 hours on the engine. Both look very nice in pictures. The older boat is about $100K less that the newer one. Assuming both pass engine and hull surveys acceptable for their age and hours, if you were in our shoes, which boat would you buy and why??

Thanks.
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Old 11-03-2019, 08:26 AM   #208
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The older boat is about $100K less that the newer one. Assuming both pass engine and hull surveys acceptable for their age and hours, if you were in our shoes, which boat would you buy and why??

Thanks.
If the older boat is in good shape, why not save $100k and buy it. There is even a chance the older boat is in better shape than the newer one....or it might have more desirable options like a brand new set of electronics. And be careful calling boats like that "old" . I'd be willing to bet the vast majority of boat owners on her have boats older than the "older" boat....me included. A 2013 boat would be pretty much new to most of us.....
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Old 11-03-2019, 09:12 AM   #209
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Yo, Dave

Your honesty in the full accounting about your NP43 is... to say the least... "Refreshing"!!

Cheers!

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Old 11-03-2019, 02:15 PM   #210
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Mr. Baker, totally understand your view, but when I use the term "old or older" it does not mean anything bad or less - it means older boats may have (and this is where I need help) have different operating characteristics - some of which I suspect are good. I know old in terms of other things - I 1have 1920's house, and drove a 1966 Galaxie for 25 years - each has its great attributes, and shortcomings if you will. For example, I would run the Galaxie to moonshine festivals in North Ga, but would never run it up to Cleveland, Oh - too much risk. That's what the admiral and I are discussing. Is a boat with 15 years on it, more like an old house that can be rebuilt and become very reliable, or is it like an older car that no matter how much you rebuild it, you are always chasing something.
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Old 11-03-2019, 02:49 PM   #211
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Mr. Baker, totally understand your view, but when I use the term "old or older" it does not mean anything bad or less - it means older boats may have (and this is where I need help) have different operating characteristics - some of which I suspect are good. I know old in terms of other things - I 1have 1920's house, and drove a 1966 Galaxie for 25 years - each has its great attributes, and shortcomings if you will. For example, I would run the Galaxie to moonshine festivals in North Ga, but would never run it up to Cleveland, Oh - too much risk. That's what the admiral and I are discussing. Is a boat with 15 years on it, more like an old house that can be rebuilt and become very reliable, or is it like an older car that no matter how much you rebuild it, you are always chasing something.
If I may...

The words new, old and quality are terms of reality that can or can not be intermixed. Just because an item such as car, boat, house or otherwise may be new or old does not mean it is or is not of high quality. Then to add into the mix of rations the maintenance history for "old" items and you have a grand aray of "in good condition" or "in bad condition" possibilities.

Seeing as this is a forum for boats, I believe it is important to realize that any boat other than new needs to have been treated well by its PO... in order to still be good quality.

Regarding used boats: There were good builders, not so good builders and really bad builders. Soooo... know the builder's history before purchase; even if the boat seems to have been kept in good condition.

Regarding new boats: Not too different than old boats regarding the quality of construction in the boat's buildout.

Choose wisely!
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Old 11-05-2019, 10:40 PM   #212
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36 or 40? single engine or two? Wedged against the wall or Queen walk around birth? Tiny frig verses larger fridge with freezer? $29K verses $71k.
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