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Old 11-30-2011, 06:50 AM   #21
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RE: Bicycles

For some of us, the ability to fold and store a bicycle in a small space may be the difference between having one (or two) on our boats or not.
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Old 11-30-2011, 09:07 AM   #22
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Bicycles

If the heart of the question is "ground transportation", this is another vote for a $30 folding grocery cart. *It only takes about an hour to walk as far as a mile out and a mile back. *It's good exercise. *Most of the time, a store is closer than that. The cart is easier to store and get on and off the boat, especially if you are on the hook.

cheers,


-- Edited by Penny Lane on Wednesday 30th of November 2011 10:08:26 AM
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Old 12-01-2011, 01:01 PM   #23
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RE: Bicycles

I have one of these rolling carts with two stacking collapsable bins. Besides walking it to and from the store, I can ride my Dahon bike one handed while towing this to the other side. I'm thinking of putting some kind of cart handle hitch on the rear rack to simply the process.*

[img]http://i.tfcdn.com/img2/7A6gyU4AY1JbwMRQXJBfVFIcn5iXEp9fWpKSn19UzJBRUlJgpa 9fXJJflKqXkZibmVOSn5ebWJSZl6qXnJ-rX1CUn5KZm64f7Byga2hoZGCg5xXgDgA*/fyVMtP8A[/img]
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Old 12-01-2011, 02:55 PM   #24
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RE: Bicycles

While gearing is important...tough to argue rolling resistance...it goes up dramatically as the wheel diameter decreases.* Seach bikes on wikipedia...

I'm with the philosophy of cheap auction or yard sales bikes...protect them for as long as you can and toss when they are too bad to deal with.* That also lessens your worry about your bike being stolen off your boat or off the sidewalk near the grocery store.*

If it's not something you use for 20-50 miles a day...then why put your money into an object if you need the money to upgrade your boat or improve your cruise?* And before anyone says their boat is perfect...I'll bet I could surveyyour boat and recommend changes that come to about the difference in a $25 yard* sale bike and a $300 plus folding bike.
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Old 12-01-2011, 07:16 PM   #25
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RE: Bicycles

Quote:
rwidman wrote:
I talked with a guy a month or so ago who had two very strange looking folding bicycles on his boat. They folded up into a very small package and a magnet held the wheels together. It took about fifteen seconds to unfold them into a useable bicycle. Instead of a chain, they used a kevlar belt for a drive system. No rust, no grease.

The down side is, they cost over $600 each.






-- Edited by rwidman on Tuesday 29th of November 2011 09:55:55 AM
*Do they provide the wig, red rubber nose, polka dot leisure suit and large shoes as part of the purchase, or do you have to buy them separately?
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Old 12-01-2011, 09:35 PM   #26
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RE: Bicycles

A talley so far indicates that while this is a small sample, the counts are fairly equal: 5 prefer folding bikes; 6 prefer full size bikes; and 4 prefer a cart.

Interestingly, there is strong criticism of folding bikes by some, as they are viewed as harder to pedal, less stable, and too expensive. Folding bike owners stongly dissagree and also believe the added cost is justified by being able to keep the bikes in good condition.*

Full bike riders claim better performance yet agree that their bikes most often have to be stored on deck and are*open to the environment and rapid deterioration. They advocate buying them cheaply and disposing of them*when required.
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Old 12-08-2011, 06:33 PM   #27
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RE: Bicycles

I vote for folders. Ever try to get one or two regular bikes in a 7.5ft Livingston dinghy to row them ashore for a ride? When your boat lives on a mooring buoy and you tend to anchor out a lot more than you stay dockside, folders (with carring bags) are the only way to go. The convenience outweighs the marginally less comfortable ride for day biking in the Gulf and San Juan Islands. They are safe and easy. Bought a nice rarely-ridden used one for $140 and a new aluminum-framed one for $260. Both are 6-speed.
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Old 12-09-2011, 03:41 AM   #28
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RE: Bicycles

"(with carring bags) are the only way to go"

Very important!!!

The bag is a great handle , as well as a carry all.
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Old 12-09-2011, 05:14 AM   #29
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RE: Bicycles

Quote:
saturnaisland wrote:
I vote for folders. Ever try to get one or two regular bikes in a 7.5ft Livingston dinghy to row them ashore for a ride? When your boat lives on a mooring buoy and you tend to anchor out a lot more than you stay dockside, folders (with carring bags) are the only way to go.
*This is a very valid "pro" for folders...without question.**
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Old 12-09-2011, 05:00 PM   #30
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RE: Bicycles

Quote:
Great Laker wrote:
A talley so far indicates that while this is a small sample, the counts are fairly equal: 5 prefer folding bikes; 6 prefer full size bikes; and 4 prefer a cart.

Interestingly, there is strong criticism of folding bikes by some, as they are viewed as harder to pedal, less stable, and too expensive. Folding bike owners stongly dissagree and also believe the added cost is justified by being able to keep the bikes in good condition.*

Full bike riders claim better performance yet agree that their bikes most often have to be stored on deck and are*open to the environment and rapid deterioration. They advocate buying them cheaply and disposing of them*when required.

Another option is to carry neither and take a bus or taxi when you need to get around on land.* You can buy a lot of bus or cab rides for the price of a bicycle.
*
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Old 12-09-2011, 08:49 PM   #31
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RE: Bicycles

If it is 2 miles or less I'll walk, weather permitting, and not too much to carry.

Otherwise we'll take a cab.

Steve W.
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Old 12-11-2011, 04:02 AM   #32
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RE: Bicycles

ANY bike big or small should be brush re painted .

Pink is the first choice , but we use Aviation Safety Yellow with good results.

KIDS will not steak super ugly , and males avoid PINK as a give away its a girls bike.

Keys and locks rust ,brass number locks are hard to release at night.
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Old 12-11-2011, 12:41 PM   #33
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RE: Bicycles

I have to different brands of folding bike Both ride well and pedal decent Bot will pinch your fingers if you are dumb like me
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Old 12-11-2011, 06:38 PM   #34
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RE: Bicycles

I keep 2 Hebb Electraglide 500 electric bicycles aboard. They're full-sized and don't fold, so I carry them atop my bridge deck using the boom and mast for hoisting. Up high, with a cover and at a cruising speed of only 7 knots, corrosion should be manageable.

*

They're pricey, about $2000 each, but they'll each carry 50 lbs of groceries at 20 mph for 3 hours per charge. *I have large water-resistant saddlebags and a rack in back, a good-sized basket in front. No vehicle registration or insurance is required. They also pedal with 7 gear speeds. So payback (per bike) comes after avoiding 100 $20 cab rides, or 40 $50 car rentals.*

*

I'm starting the Great Loop in the spring, *these bike should allow lots of cool off-boat explorations along the way. As a former avid motorcycle tourer, they also satisfy my need for 2-wheel speed.

*

I tried folding bikes with 20" wheels first - agree with the clown-bike comment.

*

Just my 400,000 cents

*

Jeff Wolf

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Pilgrim 40

Currently in Thunderbolt, GA
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:36 AM   #35
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RE: Bicycles

Although it's not really bicycle related, I appreciate the folding cart recommendation for hauling groceries and supplies. It's something I hadn't thought of before.

We haven't needed to restock groceries yet, but there's a long trip in the planning stage where we will need to do that. Also, carrying 20 lb of ice would be easier with a cart than carrying it.
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