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Old 02-10-2014, 07:52 PM   #1
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Best weather to do a bottom job?


Just thought I'd ask my Trawler Forum friends for advise. Getting ready to haul out Knot-Enuff for a bottom job, zincs and a good polishing. My question is, Does cold or cooler weather effect the final results? February in Galveston can still get cold. The weather changes each day to extremes and I don't want to start if cold will effect the outcome. I would like to beat the rush and feel I'd get better performance from the yard if they are not rushed and trying to get to the next job. What do you think and thanks for any suggestions.
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Old 02-10-2014, 08:33 PM   #2
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I can guarantee you the zincs won't be effected by the temperature.

As for the rest, I would start by reading the labels on the products.

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Old 02-10-2014, 10:23 PM   #3
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50 degees for many Interlux products,,,can be a tad cooler as long as it warms up according to tech rep.

damp is as bad as an enemy....I have seen yards paint in misty foggy cool conditions but I have also seen a few paint failures from those conditions (I Think)...

I think cool and dry is better than warm and wet....but not below 50 unless the can says so.
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Old 02-11-2014, 09:10 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
........... I would start by reading the labels on the products.
Manufacturers go to a lot of trouble to provide instructions for using their products so the end users will be satisfied with them. It's a shame more folks don't actually read those instructions.

If the printed instructions don't answer all your questions, a call or email to the manufacturer should provide the needed information.

Not all brands and types of paint will be the same as far as temperature and humidity.
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Old 02-11-2014, 09:26 AM   #5
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the only people that read the instructions less than boaters is usually the "techs" at the yard or the yard manager who doesn't care WHAT the label says...just that the customer wants to pick the boat up tomorrow and it's getting painted today no matter what...sad but true.

I enjoy talking wth the reps at Interlux..they often give tips on the product that the can and the instructions don't really cover..
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Old 02-11-2014, 11:59 AM   #6
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As state above...the instructions are fairly clear on the conditions. Most want it above 50f and dry. Many will make a statement like the hull should be 'dried out' for at leasts a min. of 24 hrs (In other words, if it stopped raining at 5 pm, don't start painting at 8am the next morning.).

The temperature and humidity will dictate drying times and min. times between coats.

I find there are several major contributors to bottom paint failure:

1) Insufficient Cleaning of Hull (every last piece of growth needs to be removed)

2) Insufficient Sanding of hull (this includes prepping paint for a new coat). People don't sand nearly as much as they should with too high a grain sandpaper.

3) Insufficient removal of dust after sanding (paint indicates what should be used to wipe down the hull. to have all dust properly removed it needs to be done more than once or at least with some attention to detail. (If you've wiped down the entire hull in 30 min. there's junk left behind).

4) Painting with the hull is wet. (I've seen people wash the hull with a hose, bucket and brush, then go to lunch. when they come back it 'looks' dry so the painting begins.

5) Painting when it is too cold. (I take the min. temp. advised by teh manufacturer and add a min. of 5, and usually 10 degrees. You can feel the difference in how the paint goes on the further from teh min. temp. you get.)
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Old 02-11-2014, 12:18 PM   #7
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Cold paint can also have a real high viscosity, going on super thick, making a rough coat, and using a lot of paint. Been there, done that. I ended up waiting for a warmer day.

Dry and warm is best, mostly.

Some paints also have a hill time limit, too long from paint to splash is not good.

Best to follow the instructions.
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Old 02-11-2014, 12:27 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrew View Post
As state above...the instructions are fairly clear on the conditions. Most want it above 50f and dry. Many will make a statement like the hull should be 'dried out' for at leasts a min. of 24 hrs (In other words, if it stopped raining at 5 pm, don't start painting at 8am the next morning.).

The temperature and humidity will dictate drying times and min. times between coats.

I find there are several major contributors to bottom paint failure:

1) Insufficient Cleaning of Hull (every last piece of growth needs to be removed)

2) Insufficient Sanding of hull (this includes prepping paint for a new coat). People don't sand nearly as much as they should with too high a grain sandpaper.

3) Insufficient removal of dust after sanding (paint indicates what should be used to wipe down the hull. to have all dust properly removed it needs to be done more than once or at least with some attention to detail. (If you've wiped down the entire hull in 30 min. there's junk left behind).

4) Painting with the hull is wet. (I've seen people wash the hull with a hose, bucket and brush, then go to lunch. when they come back it 'looks' dry so the painting begins.

5) Painting when it is too cold. (I take the min. temp. advised by teh manufacturer and add a min. of 5, and usually 10 degrees. You can feel the difference in how the paint goes on the further from teh min. temp. you get.)
After painting hundreds of hulls with Interlux ablative paints...I don't see 1,2 and 3 as big issues. I've NEVER had a paint failure on any hull I've painted except maybe a few boats that left the area and never called back to complain.

Painting over growth is actually pretty common ...not a whole layer but certainly spots especially in hard to powerwash spots. While I don't like to do it..it happens but doesn't necessarily cause a paint failure.

I have also never sanded a multi-season ablative and even some of the single season without ever sanding.

Dust on thick bottom paint shouldn't even exist if all you are doing is scratching for adhesion...but even light dust just gets blended in with the thick paint.

Sure all those steps can be done..but I never have had them cause failures like damp, incompatability, too many coats, etc...etc...
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Old 02-11-2014, 04:26 PM   #9
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Thank you all, I was just trying to ask in general terms as I plan to have the yard do the work and I probably will not read the instructions on the can nor will the yard workers. So, I was just trying to do the best by picking the best weather window. I guess I'll give it a little time for the weather to dry as this seams to be a key factor. I'm glad to know the cold weather dosen't effect my zincs. ;-)
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Old 02-11-2014, 05:50 PM   #10
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In Throne Bay and Craig Alaska it's common practice to put the boat on the tidal grid. Hose it down when the tide gets low enough and fussy skippers may use a brush w the hose. And many will use a scraper for the growth. Then let her dry out for an hour or so or less depending on how much time the tide allows.

Then quick like a bird roll and brush on a heavy coat of "Pettit Seamate" bottom paint. Wait for the tide. The Pettit paint is piled up high in the store so it's obvious very few use any other brand.
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