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Old 06-29-2016, 07:30 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Codger2 View Post
Although my bias is showing, I wondered the same thing. Point being," how many cruising sail boats are Yanmar powered? A million...2 million?"
That's because they're not relying on their engines. Any engine is considered auxiliary power in a blowboat, right?
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Old 06-29-2016, 08:00 PM   #42
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I have owned a Lehman 120 and 135. I prefer the 135 because of two issues with the 120 that do not exist with the 135. The 120 has a fuel lift pump that requires oil. The lift pump make oil as some diesel leaks into the pump. The 135 does not need a separate oil maintenance. The 120 also has an issue adding water/coolant ti the heat exchanger. Any air in the exchanger will cause the engine to overheat. The 135 does not have this problem. The appearance of 135 also looks to be a better built engine. My twin 135s have about 5500 hours each. I just pulled a manual oil pressure test and they were both right on spec.
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Old 06-29-2016, 08:45 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
That's because they're not relying on their engines. Any engine is considered auxiliary power in a blowboat, right?
If you doubt they only use the engine as "auxillary" power just ask... Sure they will be forth coming insofar as sails do not have an hour meter.
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Old 06-29-2016, 08:59 PM   #44
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I have Yanmar power as it was already installed in the boat when I purchased it. It is 16 years old with about 1,700 hours on the clock and has been absolutely reliable for me. Service requirements are simple and parts are readily available just about everywhere.

Is there some reason Yanmar has not been mentioned, good or bad in this post?

Are they better suited to higher speed applications for the larger diesels, or auxiliary sailboat power in the smaller sizes? Price? Durability? Reputation?

Just curious since I am presently 'married' to one
Now if that Yanmar has an "L" in the engine model number, it stands for longevity or long lasting. If it has a "P" in the engine model number, that stands for problematic. And if it has an "L" and a "P", that stands for long lasting problems, for Yanmar, and for the owner.
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Old 06-29-2016, 09:23 PM   #45
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If you doubt they only use the engine as "auxillary" power just ask... Sure they will be forth coming insofar as sails do not have an hour meter.
Well, it's like this. A few years after I became the first Yanmar dealer in SW Florida, Yanmar opened up an engine plant in Europe, nicknamed BeeWie. The plant only built one series of engine, the Yanmar 1gm, 2gm, and 3gm diesels, we commonly know as sailboat motors. Most of those motors are installed worldwide, in small commercial fishing vessels. They have to last. BeeWie plat output at that time put out one engine every minute, 24 hours a day, and could not keep up with the demand. The gm series replaced the hm series, lighter, and smaller. Back then the Yanmar trade magazine was called 'Scope.'

Every engine manufacturer makes some less than reliable efforts one time or another. Among them, Cat 3116, Yanmar 6LP (a Toyota block), Detroit 8.2, and so on. Then there are the best ones: Lehman 2715, Yanmar 4lh, Perkins 4-236,
Deere 4045, and so on. And Aluminun problems, well that's bad metallurgy, cheap aluminum, and it happens. Westerbeke is famous for it. Ever seen a solid brass Detroit diesel? They built them, and aluminum too.

Put a pair of 4lh Yanmars in a 31 Bertram, and it will boogie. Shut one off, and the same boat has transatlantic range at idle speed on the one engine.

Have Fun with your Engines. Keep 'em clean and maintain them like an aircraft.
And most of all, keep them cool and well lubed!
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Old 06-29-2016, 09:54 PM   #46
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Jerry,
These engines are engines not motors and we need to keep them quite warm ...... not "cool".
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Old 06-30-2016, 09:53 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by jerryreliable View Post
Well, it's like this. A few years after I became the first Yanmar dealer in SW Florida, Yanmar opened up an engine plant in Europe, nicknamed BeeWie. The plant only built one series of engine, the Yanmar 1gm, 2gm, and 3gm diesels, we commonly know as sailboat motors. Most of those motors are installed worldwide, in small commercial fishing vessels. They have to last. BeeWie plat output at that time put out one engine every minute, 24 hours a day, and could not keep up with the demand. The gm series replaced the hm series, lighter, and smaller. Back then the Yanmar trade magazine was called 'Scope.'

Every engine manufacturer makes some less than reliable efforts one time or another. Among them, Cat 3116, Yanmar 6LP (a Toyota block), Detroit 8.2, and so on. Then there are the best ones: Lehman 2715, Yanmar 4lh, Perkins 4-236,
Deere 4045, and so on. And Aluminun problems, well that's bad metallurgy, cheap aluminum, and it happens. Westerbeke is famous for it. Ever seen a solid brass Detroit diesel? They built them, and aluminum too.

Put a pair of 4lh Yanmars in a 31 Bertram, and it will boogie. Shut one off, and the same boat has transatlantic range at idle speed on the one engine.

Have Fun with your Engines. Keep 'em clean and maintain them like an aircraft.
And most of all, keep them cool and well lubed!
As far as the 4LH series goes, great engines. BUT! I will say that the "A" after the LH...as in 4LHA...is preferred. A...in this case...stand for "America". The LHAs were fitted out and finished in America. Which means the parts are SIGNIFICANTLY less expensive. The reason I know this is I owned and LHA and a very close friend owns an LH. They are actually very different motors aside from the block. A heat exchanger on the LHA...$500...the LH....$1300. Different water pumps...fuel pumps...everything. So just in case anyone was wondering, that "A" means a helluva lot even though it is one little measly letter in the model designation.
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Old 06-30-2016, 10:37 AM   #48
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For those saps that are with a newer trawler or contemplating new, most of this thread relates to venerating the past. Worse, for the Libs onboard, the discussion slobbers (like a DD) all over engines that are not enviro worthy and will lead to beach front erosion in the Hamptons.

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I must admit I do enjoy 57 Chevies especially the convertible with the Corvette FI setup as opposed to a wimpy 2 bbl.
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Old 06-30-2016, 06:05 PM   #49
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Avoid VOLVO, run from them as you would the plague; good engines, but no support from VOLVO on older engines.

This is a falsehood. I have no problem getting genuine Volvo parts for my older motors.
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Old 06-30-2016, 06:09 PM   #50
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This is a falsehood. I have no problem getting genuine Volvo parts for my older motors.
That may be true on the east coast but out here (west coast) Volvo parts are expensive and scarce! So, is it a "falsehood? I think not. It's more like 10 blind men describing an elephant....it depends on your local.
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Old 06-30-2016, 06:51 PM   #51
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The VOLVO web page proudly proclaimed, "we no longer support this product" when I inquired about parts for my two TMD40s. It's fun to go to boat shows and throw it into the face of VOLVO salesmen, especially when there is a crowd around the booth.
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Old 06-30-2016, 08:56 PM   #52
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Every engine manufacturer makes some less than reliable efforts one time or another. Among them, Cat 3116, Yanmar 6LP (a Toyota block), Detroit 8.2, and so on.
The Detroit 8.2L engines actually represent a bargain. They are quiet 4 cycle "fuel pinchers" that came out with 13mm vs 15mm head bolts and manifolds that needed a top vent. All subsequent models after 1985 had those mods.

So you can take advantage of that 'rep' and get great boats cheap, knowing that they have a very reputable school bus engine in them.

And the Web bails you out of the rare parts issue. This week I took delivery of a new (not rebuilt) turbo charger for an 8.2L marine for less than 1 BU delivered.

Add that to some BoatDiesel advice, and you should have no issues with engines per se, all things being equal.
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Old 06-30-2016, 09:05 PM   #53
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Thoughts about Detroit 8v53s? I keep eying an old Chris Craft with twins
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Old 06-30-2016, 09:22 PM   #54
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best trawler engine

Quote:
Originally Posted by ancora View Post
The VOLVO web page proudly proclaimed, "we no longer support this product" when I inquired about parts for my two TMD40s. It's fun to go to boat shows and throw it into the face of VOLVO salesmen, especially when there is a crowd around the booth.

Proudly? I'd like to see that on their page. :-) Never the less, they are, indeed, still making parts for my 2000 63L motor even though they say they don't support it... And it is true, they say that. However, to lump all Volvo motors into your definition is not the whole truth. Or at the least, isn't fair. Maybe you aren't looking in the right place. Call Dick Vosbury (actually, you will probably talk to Lee) in Annapolis at Vosbury Marine and see what he (she) (they) can do for you.
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Old 06-30-2016, 10:52 PM   #55
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Perkins 4-236. Bulletproof.
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Old 07-13-2016, 11:49 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by djones44;
And the Web bails you out of the rare parts issue. This week I took delivery of a new (not rebuilt) turbo charger for an 8.2L marine for less than 1 BU delivered.
20 questions; well, not quite.
Is there a model number that distinguishes pre and post 1985?
Which parts are you finding rare?
What happened to the turbo and can you expect it's twin brother to die?
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Old 07-13-2016, 07:51 PM   #57
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The Cummins started being installed in trawlers in the 90s. Even though it is a great engine for a trawler in its 6BT configuation, I suspect your budget will lead you to something older.


Lehmans have fantastic support from American Diesel, the guy who originally marinized the Ford.


But a normally aspirated Perkins would be a good choice also.


Both were installed in trawlers from the mid 70s into the late 80s, early 90s.


You sometimes see Detroit 8.2s in trawlers. It doesn't have a good rep. Detroit 4-53s were installed in the Hatteras LRC and while a very solid engine, are noisy and vibrate at low speeds.


Most other marine engines don't have enough displacement to go low and slow while pushing a 20,000+ lb boat.


So Cummins, Lehman and Perkins would be my choice.


David
Ya know I kept hearing about the noise, vibration and propensity to leak oil of the Detroit 453's while I was considering and shopping for LRC's. I couldn't have been more surprised at how smooth, clean and quiet they were in the boat I bought. They don't burn or leak hardly any oil, way less than Lehmans I've had. And maybe it's a testament to the 1976 Hatteras engine room sound proofing but this is the quietest boat I've ever had allowing normal conversation anywhere on the boat underway.
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Old 07-13-2016, 08:30 PM   #58
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The Detroit 8.2L engines actually represent a bargain. They are quiet 4 cycle "fuel pinchers" that came out with 13mm vs 15mm head bolts and manifolds that needed a top vent. All subsequent models after 1985 had those mods.

So you can take advantage of that 'rep' and get great boats cheap, knowing that they have a very reputable school bus engine in them.

And the Web bails you out of the rare parts issue. This week I took delivery of a new (not rebuilt) turbo charger for an 8.2L marine for less than 1 BU delivered.

Add that to some BoatDiesel advice, and you should have no issues with engines per se, all things being equal.
Ditto. Great low to intermediate power engine for a slow to intermediate speed boat (semi-planing, for example). I've been running a pair of 250 turbos for ten years with absolutely zero issues. None. NOS and used spares show up all the time on ebay. I finally stopped buying them when I discovered the engine is bullet proof. Big displacement, low power, big torque, lightly stressed. No leaks, no injection pumps, instant start, great fuel economy, and that lovely big block V8 rumble.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:55 PM   #59
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Detroit 2 cycles are heavy duty engines. They are made to be rebuilt endlessly. Most recreational boat engines are light duty. Many light duty engines are not made to be overhauled but replaced.
I have twins because I like the handling, but if I had a single, it would be a 2 cycle Detroit. Other than the starter, no electrical requirements, no circuit boards, no electronic sensors, no injector pump, once started will run until fuel is exhausted.
As to 453s, same basic design, smaller cylinders. I ran 6v53s in Vietnam. We often ran at full throttle, sometime for hours and days at a time. To stop them you had to sink the boat or blow a hole thru the engine - a big hole.
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Old 07-13-2016, 09:55 PM   #60
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Why?... Aluminum has corrosion issues that cast iron does not. If you look at Cat, Cummins and Detroit, they typically use NO Al in contact with coolant. Look at any engine still in service at say 30-40-50yrs and you won't find Al in contact with coolant. Iron or bronze only. Real engines don't use Al.
Perhaps you're right. But when they built my boat in 1954 they grabbed a couple of aluminum block 6-71 Gray gennies from a minesweeper and turned them into prime movers on my boat. That boat, under various owners, powered all over the world reliably. Granted it's true that 50 years later I found corrosion of the water passage seals on top of the block, but a little JB Weld fixed that and then I continued cruising up and down the Pacific.

Personally I would prefer iron blocks, but I get the feeling that if you found a 6-71 made of plastic that it would still last 10k+ hours .

PS- OP how much hp do you need? You can setup a 2-71N with small injectors if you only need about 60hp.
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