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Old 06-28-2016, 05:25 PM   #21
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Bayliner used Mitsubishi and Hino Diesel engines in their 38' boats built from the early 80s to mid 90s. I would avoid the Mitsubishi powered boats especially the turbo charged units. The Hino EH700 are a 6 cylinder naturally aspirated 175 hp, in the last few years of production they used a 4 cylinder turbo charged 210 hp. Both of these are sturdy long lived engines given proper care but my preference would be the simpler NA 6 cylinder EH700. Parts are available from North Harbor Diesel in Washington and other sources. They also built a few gas powered boats if those would interest you. Depending where your located these could be in your budget very easily, they are still popular boats in the pnw and prices in that area are higher than the gulf or east coast, there are a few on the rivers and Great Lakes, there are always a few for sale around the country.
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Old 06-28-2016, 05:56 PM   #22
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I am fond of my Perkins 4-236s. They seem to be well regarded and very reliable. Pretty frugal too.

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Old 06-28-2016, 08:00 PM   #23
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Up to 100 HP, I like Kaboda. Simple, reliable, blocks stay around for a long time and parts are widely available around the world. I'd dearly love to have a Garner but in the US it's hard to beat a John Deere. Cummins second. My dream marinization would be an International DT series, wet sleeve, in 360, 408, 466 and 530 versions. For a circumnavigation, a 53 or 71 series Detroit would also be a very safe bet.
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Old 06-28-2016, 09:12 PM   #24
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You can have that DT , especially the 466. Liners seem to always eventually leak. The newer electronic DTs have injector o ring issues, among other things. And the fact that a marinization would be expensive. Cummins C series trumps them everywhere.
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Old 06-28-2016, 11:50 PM   #25
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I am fond of my Perkins 4-236s. They seem to be well regarded and very reliable. Pretty frugal too.

Kevin
I was waiting for some love for the venerable Perkins 4.236. Thanks 'Swede!!
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Old 06-28-2016, 11:54 PM   #26
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I was waiting for some love for the venerable Perkins 4.236. Thanks 'Swede!!
I have some 4.236 experience. They are excellent engines!!!!! Probably Perkins' best!!!!
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:15 AM   #27
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It's hard to find a more reliable and proven engine than an in-line 671-naturally aspirated Detroit. Readily available parts and reparable world wide. All mechanical; no electronics, sensors or computers to shut you down at inopportune times. You can lose all electrical power and they keep running. Biggest downside is the noise, which is mostly from the blower system.
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Old 06-29-2016, 04:08 AM   #28
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It's hard to find a more reliable and proven engine than an in-line 671-naturally aspirated Detroit. Readily available parts and reparable world wide. All mechanical; no electronics, sensors or computers to shut you down at inopportune times. You can lose all electrical power and they keep running. Biggest downside is the noise, which is mostly from the blower system.
ditto

I would add no injector pump, originally designed to be rebuildable in the field, including pumps, blower and so on. Cared for naturals can go double the hours of a typical yacht diesel. Mine were over 20,000 hours when rebuilt.
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Old 06-29-2016, 04:15 AM   #29
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Excluding your budget: John Deere/Lugger.
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Old 06-29-2016, 05:42 AM   #30
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With an old boat and a budget the engine choice is less of a concern than

"Soft decks, leaky Windows, moisture saturated bulkheads or sandwich hulls are far more to deal with than an engine that have readily available parts"

These defects can eat months of work , piles of currency and will be ongoing problems as repair can not fix inherent problems..


IF the engine is common . and parts are available , concentrate on the boat issues, not the engine make , if you wish to get off the dock.

A quick look in the boats engine locker , Diesel rated lube oil or car stuff?

On start up from COLD !!!! how long does the white smoke come out the exhaust?

Underway , what temperature does white smoke go away ?

Displacement speed cruiser engines are seldom worn out , most are killed bu poor or non existing maint.
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Old 06-29-2016, 07:28 AM   #31
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What FF said!
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Old 06-29-2016, 07:42 AM   #32
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I have Yanmar power as it was already installed in the boat when I purchased it. It is 16 years old with about 1,700 hours on the clock and has been absolutely reliable for me. Service requirements are simple and parts are readily available just about everywhere.

Is there some reason Yanmar has not been mentioned, good or bad in this post?

Are they better suited to higher speed applications for the larger diesels, or auxiliary sailboat power in the smaller sizes? Price? Durability? Reputation?

Just curious since I am presently 'married' to one
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Old 06-29-2016, 09:01 AM   #33
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Normally aspirated Yanmar engines are great for trawlers, but the biggest one Yanmar makes is about 54 hp in a 2 liter JH engine. That is fine for your size trawler, but the OP's 36-40' needs more cubes.


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Old 06-29-2016, 09:14 AM   #34
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Is there some reason Yanmar has not been mentioned, good or bad in this post?
Although my bias is showing, I wondered the same thing. Point being," how many cruising sail boats are Yanmar powered? A million...2 million?"
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Old 06-29-2016, 10:03 AM   #35
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Although my bias is showing, I wondered the same thing. Point being," how many cruising sail boats are Yanmar powered? A million...2 million?"

I think the OP budget was for a 70k "trawler" so I think that's maybe why Yanmar wasn't mentioned?
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Old 06-29-2016, 10:46 AM   #36
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I have Yanmar power as it was already installed in the boat when I purchased it. It is 16 years old with about 1,700 hours on the clock and has been absolutely reliable for me. Service requirements are simple and parts are readily available just about everywhere.

Is there some reason Yanmar has not been mentioned, good or bad in this post?

Are they better suited to higher speed applications for the larger diesels, or auxiliary sailboat power in the smaller sizes? Price? Durability? Reputation?

Just curious since I am presently 'married' to one
Why? Aluminum. Exhaust manifold is Al, and a bunch of other parts too. Aluminum has corrosion issues that cast iron does not. If you look at Cat, Cummins and Detroit, they typically use NO Al in contact with coolant. Look at any engine still in service at say 30-40-50yrs and you won't find Al in contact with coolant. Iron or bronze only. Real engines don't use Al.

Yanmar, Volvo, Deere like to use Al for exh manifolds. Why?? To save weight?? For a trawler??? Save 40lbs?? Yay.

Why do we hate the TA Perkins 6.354? Aluminum. Why hate the Ford/Lehman TA's? Aluminum. Why is that 20yr old Westerbeke gennie in my shop, soon to go to recycling? Aluminum exh manifold rotted and flooded engine.

Pull a HX tube bundle out of an Al manifold. Hmmm. Sealing surface all pitted and now I have to deal with it. Fun. Glad I saved that 40lbs!!

Sorry, rant mode off....
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Old 06-29-2016, 12:29 PM   #37
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Why? Aluminum. Exhaust manifold is Al, and a bunch of other parts too. Aluminum has corrosion issues that cast iron does not. If you look at Cat, Cummins and Detroit, they typically use NO Al in contact with coolant. Look at any engine still in service at say 30-40-50yrs and you won't find Al in contact with coolant. Iron or bronze only. Real engines don't use Al.

Yanmar, Volvo, Deere like to use Al for exh manifolds. Why?? To save weight?? For a trawler??? Save 40lbs?? Yay.

Why do we hate the TA Perkins 6.354? Aluminum. Why hate the Ford/Lehman TA's? Aluminum. Why is that 20yr old Westerbeke gennie in my shop, soon to go to recycling? Aluminum exh manifold rotted and flooded engine.

Pull a HX tube bundle out of an Al manifold. Hmmm. Sealing surface all pitted and now I have to deal with it. Fun. Glad I saved that 40lbs!!

Sorry, rant mode off....

Eeeeek. 😳
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Old 06-29-2016, 05:10 PM   #38
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So those old single engine fishing boats going out to the Grand Banks every week, running Luggers (Deeres) are in trouble?

The many Nordhavns circumnavigating using the same engine better beware?

Thinking not.
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Old 06-29-2016, 05:31 PM   #39
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Cummins All the way. I have a '78 Albin 36 with a cummins 6BT. Albin started putting that engine in their trawler in '87. My PO dropped one in my boat in '86. Look for an Albin starting from 1987 and you may come across one with the Cummins.
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Old 06-29-2016, 06:17 PM   #40
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Best engine?

Mitsubishi of course.
That's what we've got in our boat and it's perfect. Smooth, quiet, reliable and even inexpensive. It has starting glow plugs and because it's marineized by Klassen (now Yukon Engines) there is no aluminum on the engine except the valve cover.
We had a fuel delivery proplem that was'nt the fault of the engine itself but the way the fuel lines were installed. That's it.
I don't know how it could be any better. Happy camper.
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