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Old 05-27-2016, 09:53 PM   #21
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Richard,
It is a long way across some big water either south or west of Hawaii.. And there is a LOT of Pacific Ocean out there. If one wishes to stay in the N.Pac Hawaii is ok.. if you want to go South it is a uncomfortable ride with a big beam sea for a long way.
One the plus side you have a great boat to do it in
HOLLYWOOD
My question would be to you sir how does your ocean alexandra compare to a nord and kk in your opinion?
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Old 05-28-2016, 12:07 AM   #22
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Britt-if you are really interested primarily in multi-day offshore fishing, neither the Nord or the KK would be on my list. Neither is set up for fishing and would take major modifications before either would be even minimally suitable. For that you really need something like what MYTraveler has, I think a 75' Mikelson.
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Old 05-28-2016, 12:28 AM   #23
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Britt-if you are really interested primarily in multi-day offshore fishing, neither the Nord or the KK would be on my list. Neither is set up for fishing and would take major modifications before either would be even minimally suitable. For that you really need something like what MYTraveler has, I think a 75' Mikelson.
That's where things really get complicated for him as the Mikelson and most other similar boats lacks the range to cross the Atlantic or Pacific. The 75' Mikelson only carries 2600 gallons of fuel and with twin 1825 HP CAT's that's not going to get you across.

Sportfishing aficionados could never live with the slow speed of a KK or Nordhavn. They want to get to the hot spots more quickly.

Ultimately all boats are compromises and a KK or Nordhavn could be modified to be an ok fishing vessel.
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Old 05-28-2016, 05:20 AM   #24
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"i mostly fish and want a boat that can handle a typhoon or hurricane and force 10 winds seas."

Weather fax is free on the air to your computer.

There is no reason ever to be caught out in F10 . 55-65K no big deal but 120K , hardly.

The hassle is the compromises required to survive in really heavy weather (which would include rollovers) makes for a really crappy vessel for the 99.999 of the time .

Huge fuel and water tanks , eat much of the interior volume .

Tiny ports , super strong doors and the requirement for multiple hand holds inside do not make for a comfortable boat at any time.

Watch a couple of issues on TV of the folks fishing off Alaska in the winter and decide if that is going to be your retirement dream.
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Old 05-28-2016, 09:46 AM   #25
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Britt-if you are really interested primarily in multi-day offshore fishing, neither the Nord or the KK would be on my list. Neither is set up for fishing and would take major modifications before either would be even minimally suitable. For that you really need something like what MYTraveler has, I think a 75' Mikelson.
That is where Mikelsons excel. Some of the features, like large in-transom bait tanks, plenty of rod holders, scanning sonar and a tower can be added to many boats, some other aspects are inherent to the design. For example, there are no deck supports or other obstructions to prevent an angler from following a fish around the boat with ease. And since the larger Mikelsons are semi-custom, an owner can have the boat fine tuned to his needs.




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That's where things really get complicated for him as the Mikelson and most other similar boats lacks the range to cross the Atlantic or Pacific. The 75' Mikelson only carries 2600 gallons of fuel and with twin 1825 HP CAT's that's not going to get you across.
Actually, the Mikelson Nomad is not a go-fast boat, but is instead optimized for range. We carry 2300 gallons, typically travel at 8.7 knots (a little slower at night and when trolling for tuna) and average a little better than 1 nmpg. Slowing even one knot hugely increases the range, improving efficiency to better than 1.5 nmpg. Without any effort to maximize range, in one trip we burned less than half our fuel and covered 1200 nm. On that basis, I think the boat has the range to make it the 2200nm to Hawaii, though if I were doing it, I would run at 7.5 knots (or slower if need be) until my remaining fuel, relative to DTG gave a more comfortable margin.

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Sportfishing aficionados could never live with the slow speed of a KK or Nordhavn. They want to get to the hot spots more quickly.
My last boat was a go-fast sportfishing battlewagon, which carried 1,000 gallons of fuel. I could easily burn all of it in a weekend of fishing within 100 miles of port. But I lacked the range to get to Guadalupe Island (something like 170nm out of Ensenada) and fish for a week, at least without bladders and running the boat at displacement speeds -- not good for my DD's, which like to be hot.

Since the really good fishing (which I define as the chance to catch more, bigger, and different fish than I am accustomed to) is not close enough for the weekend warriors to reach, I went on a search for a long range sportfisher. Mikelson doesn't have a good PR machine, in fact it barely advertises and most of its ads are for their most affordable and popular boats (go-fast sportfishers). So, it was only by luck that I stumbled into the Nomad. I had settled on a Nordhavn, and was at the stage of negotiating the contract. I quickly realized that a Nomad better suited my needs. Much better, although I have no ambitions to cross any ocean. I do aspire to go to the Galapagos, Costa Rica, Panama, through the canal and see what lies beyond. Before that, I want to get to Alaska. Other Nomads (and there aren't many), have done all of that before and I believe those owners would all agree they have the right boat for that sort of mission.
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Old 05-28-2016, 10:40 AM   #26
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My question would be to you sir how does your ocean alexandra compare to a nord and kk in your opinion?
Interesting question...

We bought the O.A. as a temporary boat.. I figure five years max we will keep it. For what we plan to do with it it's a really great boat.. actually better suited than my previous passage making capable boat for the Pac. N.W.
Easier to handle,dock,operate,own than a more complicated true passagemaker ( I.E. Nordhavn with multiple ac units, generators, watermaker, get home engine etc. ) Great layout, fast, comfy .. and above all else a great value.
I wouldn't hesitate to cruise the O.A. between Alaska and Panama.. all coastal cruising in my view. She has about a 1000 mile range at 8kts and doesnt roll too bad for a non-stabilized boat.
The build quality is ok.. not fantastic.. but the previous owner had spent an insane amount of money on her having it professionally re wired, re plumbed and totally updated. Her systems are fairly complicated for a typical O.A. with a watermaker, hydronic heat, multiple refrigerators etc.

She is a great boat but not even close in the league of Nordhavn or a Kady Krogen as a true distance/ long term liveaboard cruising boat.

In the last five years we have gone the opposite direction most boaters go..from a palatial custom 47' passagemaker to a 40' luxurious fast 40' SeaRay to a slow 40' O.A. Europa.. all completely different boats designed for different types of boating.. all did their respective type of boating actually very well.
The choice comes down to this..
What you wish to do with the boat
What you can afford.

I am also lucky as I spend time on other folks Nordhavn's in many other countries and that has fulfilled my Nordhavn lust for the short term.. and given me great knowledge of the boats that can only be gained by going to sea in them.

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Old 05-28-2016, 11:29 AM   #27
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Good question: I will in all probability use the boat for offshore fishing likely out of sight of land 80% of the time I'm aboard. The other 20% will likely be gunkholing and i am entertaining the idea of an atlantic crossing and a trip to Hawaii. I'm retired and can fine the time. But the truth is i mostly fish and want a boat that can handle a typhoon or hurricane and force 10 winds seas.
So far you've indicated that 100% of the time you'll either be fishing offshore or gunk holing. So the question you've asked, is the wrong question! A huge number of boats Will do what you've indicated you want to do!
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Old 05-28-2016, 02:59 PM   #28
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Nordhavn.

The 46 is one of my favorite boats .. even the style except for the stern hull shape. The stern is fine functionally but lacks graceful lines. The 46 was featured in "voyaging under Power" and the design was slanted heavily toward passagemaking. Probably the only 100% FD Nordhavn. Others are 98 to 99% FD IMO. We just went aboard one at Anacortes Trawler Fest. Was an old boat and the cap rails are wood as evidenced by missing sections of the outer coating. I had always thought the CR was plastic. What a chore that would be to refinish! My favorite boat though.


THE 43 was was praised heavily for being better than the 46 w a longer WLL so may be a bit faster than the 46 but may burn a bit more fuel. Don't like the chunky looks but the 43 is probably a very good boat.

But if I had a Seaton boat to choose from I'd probably go for that. Steel and heavy full displacement.
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Old 05-28-2016, 08:00 PM   #29
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Britt-if you are really interested primarily in multi-day offshore fishing, neither the Nord or the KK would be on my list. Neither is set up for fishing and would take major modifications before either would be even minimally suitable. For that you really need something like what MYTraveler has, I think a 75' Mikelson.
Thnks I'll check them out. Your right they wont be as good as my grady was but far more comfortable especially for extended stays
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Old 05-28-2016, 08:07 PM   #30
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"i mostly fish and want a boat that can handle a typhoon or hurricane and force 10 winds seas."

Weather fax is free on the air to your computer.

There is no reason ever to be caught out in F10 . 55-65K no big deal but 120K , hardly.

The hassle is the compromises required to survive in really heavy weather (which would include rollovers) makes for a really crappy vessel for the 99.999 of the time .

Huge fuel and water tanks , eat much of the interior volume .

Tiny ports , super strong doors and the requirement for multiple hand holds inside do not make for a comfortable boat at any time.

Watch a couple of issues on TV of the folks fishing off Alaska in the winter and decide if that is going to be your retirement dream.
Youyr right and i don't plan on being caught in those conditions but stuff happens.
The Nord's look very solid but so do the kk's and both seem to have well structured doors thats why i chose them, definately not because of there fishing amenities. Not interested in a 75 foot boat i could never afford to take it out and would be one of those weekend marina people that are so common. My boats get used
Thanks for the comment
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Old 05-28-2016, 08:14 PM   #31
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but a 75ft boat is more than i need for just me. I often go alone have done so al my life. Shoot, a 30 ft grady white does a fine job but not comfortable for extended stays and sucks fuel. 40 ft is about right and i likely will never do even as much with it as you have planned. If you sail to Alaska you should stop in Winchester Bay Oregon and I'll show you around...or Coo's Bay.
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Old 05-28-2016, 08:20 PM   #32
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chuckle...I have owned bigger then smaller then bigger never ever owning less than two boats at any given time for the reasons you stated. No one boat can do it all it will only excell at the task its designers speced.
I've learned much from everyones pots and greatly appreciate the input. Thanks all
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Old 05-28-2016, 08:24 PM   #33
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So far you've indicated that 100% of the time you'll either be fishing offshore or gunk holing. So the question you've asked, is the wrong question! A huge number of boats Will do what you've indicated you want to do!
But if caught in extreme seas will they all survive equally well? I picked Nordhavn and KK because of owner stories of what they have survived. Both brands seem to me to be at the top of the chart for survivability
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Old 05-28-2016, 08:29 PM   #34
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Nordhavn.

The 46 is one of my favorite boats .. even the style except for the stern hull shape. The stern is fine functionally but lacks graceful lines. The 46 was featured in "voyaging under Power" and the design was slanted heavily toward passagemaking. Probably the only 100% FD Nordhavn. Others are 98 to 99% FD IMO. We just went aboard one at Anacortes Trawler Fest. Was an old boat and the cap rails are wood as evidenced by missing sections of the outer coating. I had always thought the CR was plastic. What a chore that would be to refinish! My favorite boat though.


THE 43 was was praised heavily for being better than the 46 w a longer WLL so may be a bit faster than the 46 but may burn a bit more fuel. Don't like the chunky looks but the 43 is probably a very good boat.

But if I had a Seaton boat to choose from I'd probably go for that. Steel and heavy full displacement.
I waffle back and forth but i also tend to like the looks of the Nord 46 but like the range of the kk 39, 44. But the fact of the matter is they are all very expensive for occasional use. I could never live on a boat no room for my toys...well part time aboard is ok
Seaton huh? Thanks I'll look them up
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Old 05-28-2016, 09:11 PM   #35
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Nordhavn's and KK's are both great boats. In the end it's personal preference as they're both very capable boats, we liked what the Nordhavn had to offer in comparison to the KK. For what you're talking, the Nordhavn 75EYF is what you need, just maybe not all 75ft of it lol.
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Old 05-28-2016, 09:35 PM   #36
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Read all of these and believe I will stick with my Romsdal. More fuel, more water, greater range, and well proven in the blue. Easily did New Orleans to Belize and back without thinking too much about fuel. Comfy well proven ride.
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Old 05-28-2016, 10:04 PM   #37
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Read all of these and believe I will stick with my Romsdal. More fuel, more water, greater range, and well proven in the blue. Easily did New Orleans to Belize and back without thinking too much about fuel. Comfy well proven ride.
Romsdal??....thanks for bringing these to my attention i have never heard of them before. How many gph is your burn and at what speed?
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Old 05-29-2016, 04:15 AM   #38
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There are a couple of them on here. The Delphin and mine (Ulysses), my burn is about 3 gph on a single Volvo TMD 102A @ 8 kph. Norwegian built. Might want to google them. They are steel hull true blue water LRC proven performers.
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Old 05-29-2016, 09:58 AM   #39
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Everything involves compromise and there's no free lunch. Basing decisions on how you will use a boat sounds smart but isn't going to work for most people because most, including me, have desires and ideas, hopefully informed by experience, when picking the vessel. Plans come later. To me that suggests that the prudent approach is to pick the most capable boat you can manage. Of course there are exceptions. Some people do start with very concrete plans and buy the boat to suit, but I suspect that's rare. Otherwise there wouldn't be so many sitting around unused. That said, both are great boats. I only ended up with a N46 because I couldn't find a KK42 in decent condition at what I felt was a fair price.
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Old 05-29-2016, 10:44 AM   #40
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But if caught in extreme seas will they all survive equally well? I picked Nordhavn and KK because of owner stories of what they have survived. Both brands seem to me to be at the top of the chart for survivability
Art DeFever, the Monks etc (the list is very long) designed most of their boats for off shore work lasting days on end. The trick is to avoid those bad conditions you are so concerned about. Very doable if you are not more than say 200 miles from safe harbor and have a modicum of communications.

Look at the boats that leave Coos Bay on a daily basis to go fishing. Certainly not Ns or KKs. Codgers point is a good one, you are describing a vessel that need not have blue water range.
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