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Old 10-25-2014, 03:09 AM   #41
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Most wouldn't think twice about the $1300.00

It's the 700+ miles of crappy water that keeps a lot of California boats down south.


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Old 10-25-2014, 03:25 AM   #42
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Most wouldn't think twice about the $1300.00

It's the 700+ miles of crappy water that keeps a lot of California boats down south.
Exactly. That's why I take cruise ships. Don't look forward to bouncing for days on end.
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Old 10-25-2014, 05:04 AM   #43
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Most wouldn't think twice about the $1300.00

It's the 700+ miles of crappy water that keeps a lot of California boats down south.


Hollywood
That's why God invented trucks and created companies like Associated to operate them.

Which is how we "cruised" our boat from Alameda to Puget Sound.
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Old 10-25-2014, 08:04 AM   #44
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When much younger and regularly cruising off the Pacific Coast the rigors of life at sea were the norm. Then I read a few things in the boat mags and on TF and became dissuaded from venturing out unless 101 issues are tended to. Then guys like Panope come along and remind me that we can pretty well do whatever we put our mind to, thank you.
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Old 10-25-2014, 11:53 AM   #45
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But Tom,
That makes us risk takers on a very conservative forum.
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Old 10-26-2014, 12:36 AM   #46
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[QUOTE="markpierce;278307"]

But the PNW is less than one fill-up-at-the-start .

You should go! It would be the trip of a lifetime!
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Old 10-26-2014, 12:37 AM   #47
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Most wouldn't think twice about the $1300.00

It's the 700+ miles of crappy water that keeps a lot of California boats down south.


Hollywood
Yes, not a trip i would be interested in without lots of time to pick and choose my conditions.
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Old 10-26-2014, 05:02 AM   #48
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Your boat is too cool ! Love it
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Old 10-26-2014, 10:33 AM   #49
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Panope
Your boat is too cool ! Love it
Thanks Pack Mule,

I like yours too but I could not find an online source for more information/pics. I would be curious to see how the interior is layed out with such a large chunk of space dedicated to the aft deck.

I see that you are in Tennessee. A fantasy of mine is to truck Panope to Sioux City Iowa (closest put-in) and explore the river system. Are you traveling much or mostly hanging around that big lake I see on the Tennessee map?

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Old 10-26-2014, 10:52 AM   #50
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Thanks Panope .Our boat was built in Fla nah he only built a couple . The builder built about 40 tugs that were 26 ft long . Ours has wheelhouse , vberth , and wet head ., but it does have a walk in engine room from the vberth . We just travel about 40 miles each way from our marina . I'm still working and only have long weekends .we completly rebuilt the inside and last year replaced teak cap rail and new teak wheel house doors . We are painting on the boat this weekend .
There is a Colvin at our dock that has been in same slip for 20 yrs and has never left . I will try to get a picture to send .
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Old 10-26-2014, 11:49 AM   #51
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Getting back to the perfect NW boat...

42' Nordic Tug is my vote, fast when you need it, good layout, goes slow and sips fuel too, no teak, good lines and US built.

That being said not MY idea of the perfect boat.. too run of the mill for my tastes. And I still have not got over the time the then Pres. of Nordic drug anchor down on me and tried to blame me for us apparently dragging anchor into the wind. Gouged up the two week old hull paint job and not even a apology.

I guess I need to learn to let things go.

HOLLYWOOD
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Old 10-26-2014, 12:40 PM   #52
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Mine is the best boat for the pacific northwest.
You should buy it.
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Old 11-02-2014, 11:39 AM   #53
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My Willard 40 is one of three widebody boats built in Costa Mesa, Cal. In the Seventies. We appreciate her heavy displacement and spacious saloon and the five large windows looking forward. But her best quality was learned the hard way when we got caught on the Strait of Georgia in a big following sea -- to our delight, those big wind driven waves simply rolled under Northstar's canoe stern and kept on going. Click image for larger version

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Old 11-02-2014, 12:22 PM   #54
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My Willard 40 is one of three widebody boats built in Costa Mesa, Cal. In the Seventies. We appreciate her heavy displacement and spacious saloon and the five large windows looking forward. But her best quality was learned the hard way when we got caught on the Strait of Georgia in a big following sea -- to our delight, those big wind driven waves simply rolled under Northstar's canoe stern and kept on going. Attachment 34095[ATTACH]34092[/ATTACH
While I believe good sea keeping in hash conditions is important, more so for people who travel long distance in open water, it is not critical for the average boater who travels in protected areas. I spend a lot of time on the water both East coast and PNW and over the last 60 years of boating I have only been caught out a few times twice in the straight of Georgia. I think sea keeping has to be balanced with a boats other attributes. There is also the argument that a fast boat is more capable of avoiding bad conditions and when caught out may be more capable of running for cover. For example when caught out in the Straight of Georgia in my sail boat I spent 4 hours in the mixer. When caught out in my Lobster boat I put the pedal to the metal bounced around a bit and was out of it in about an hour. With my present boat ,not a bad sea boat, I have the speed when needed to avoid bad weather by planning fast crossings in good conditions or not leaving port when things are expected to be adverse. If I lay over for bad weather I know I can make up the time if need be. Just another way of looking at the issue. For someone looking for a good PNW boat there is a very wide rage of types not all nessaseraly slow full displacement types. My preference for the PNW is the SD with a rage of speed from 6 to 16K. I believe this leaves the skipper with options in planning crossings and rapids transit, important things in the PNW.
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Old 11-02-2014, 02:04 PM   #55
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I think for me the big ones to make a good boat for the PNW
1. I do not have to sit outside in the rain to run the boat.
2. It has heat.
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Old 11-02-2014, 02:07 PM   #56
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In my opinion the perfect PACNW boat has...
  • A Raised Pilothouse because you want a nice spot to drive from out of the rain.
  • A Covered Cockpit because you want a nice place to sit or fish from out of the rain.
  • A Large Flying Bridge because when its nice up here, its really nice and you need an outdoor place to soak up the sun.
  • A place to store a large tender because there is so much to explore.
  • A reasonable price because you shouldn't have to be rich to enjoy boating.

There are lots of examples of great PACNW boats.

Here's a photo of just one of many.

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Old 11-02-2014, 03:11 PM   #57
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I put up a post earlier this year on the Cruising-West Coast section of this forum called Stuff in the Water. I included some photos I'd taken of the Fraser River.

While dry sorting may have reduced the amount of debris, there is still tons of it, brought down by the rivers, escaped from log rafts and the raft make-up areas like Beaver Cove up by Port McNeil, and lifted off the shorelines on a high tide.

More than enough opportunities to take out a prop or a strut or a rudder or a hull still today.
We must have an anti-debris force field around us, as we are currently returning from Port Townsend (AP slaved to Coastal Explorer, so we can sleep, play Scrabble, etc.) and after hour 8 of run time I've spotted two seagulls on a log around 12" long, one kelp bundle and a floating cutting board. Weird, huh?

Now, I did wake up for a moment while below (wife was playing her Cello forward), and spotted some people swimming in our wake. Well, maybe not swimming exactly, but treading water while holding onto seat cushions, but I don't count people as debris.
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Old 11-02-2014, 03:13 PM   #58
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Panope, your boat is a winner, love it. Go ahead, raise the sails! Forward mast like a Sharpie? Tell us more about the design.
And she is even prettier under sail. Panope posted a great thread called "Happiness is a warm spool gun" on Cruisers Forum that documents the restoration of this lovely vessel.
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Old 11-02-2014, 03:23 PM   #59
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I think for me the big ones to make a good boat for the PNW
1. I do not have to sit outside in the rain to run the boat.
2. It has heat.
That pretty much sums it up Bryan. We had a 28' Albin between a cruising sailboat and Delfin and took it to Rivers Inlet, around Vancouver Island and a made a number of trips to Barkley Sound beside toodling around the San Juans year long. It cruised at around 12 knots, you were inside, it was warm and if you watched the weather had as much fun as it is legal to have cruising. Not much more is needed.
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Old 11-02-2014, 03:34 PM   #60
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Either slow or fast if it's a good boat. People in the 50s had a great time driving their outboards to Juneau .. frequently in groups. The PNW has a lot of cloudy and frequently wet weather so cabin comforts, space, long on provisions and the knack of spending a day or two at anchor w/o any cabin fever could be more important than either speed or seaworthyness. Happily cloudy weather produces lots of very calm seas. But if given the choice of a 20 knot boat or a seaworthy boat I'd pick the latter but only if I had the time to go slow. And slow makes a much better experience going far in the PNW. But speed works too.

Fuel economy has a lot to do w it depending on how much money one has for fuel. A good SE Alaska cruise should be at least 3000 miles. One should spend time doing high mileage days but the opposite of that usually is the core of the trip.
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