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Old 02-01-2013, 11:20 AM   #101
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City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
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1 wind will cool an electric grill just as quickly as gas or charcoal BBQ. Depends on location and design of the cover, ventilation, etc, not the heat source.

2 to be a BBQ, (where I live) it won't be electric. That would be a grill.

3 I used to buy a $30 sheet steel case, propane BBQ at Safeway and it would self destruct within a couple of years. Got tired of that after 3 or 4 iterations so bought a Dickinson Sea-B-Que, (small size) on which the burner failed after 10 or so yrs, replaced with the same model (replacing just the burner comparatively too expensive). More money per yr avg, but cooks better, looks better, easier to stow.

4 Never had, nor seen, a propane BBQ flare up. Have seen charcoal flare-ups, but I agree with psneeld on that subject. Saw boats burn to the water line from Alcohol stove flare-ups, twice. Those are far more dangerous IMHO. Also seen cars with burned hoods from carb flare-ups, even without brainless added gas. ? When are boat engines (gas) going to be all fuel injection?

5 I use a 5 lb propane tank on mine, and where I keep my BBQ and tank, on the back cabin top, just aft of the main cabin, is always out of the wind when anchored, but in a raft can get windy, so can easily be moved to a more protected spot.

6 I enjoy reading most of this forum, but some degenerate to p*ssing contests that get rather tiresome.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:18 PM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koliver View Post
1 wind will cool an electric grill just as quickly as gas or charcoal BBQ. Depends on location and design of the cover, ventilation, etc, not the heat source.

2 to be a BBQ, (where I live) it won't be electric. That would be a grill.

3 I used to buy a $30 sheet steel case, propane BBQ at Safeway and it would self destruct within a couple of years. Got tired of that after 3 or 4 iterations so bought a Dickinson Sea-B-Que, (small size) on which the burner failed after 10 or so yrs, replaced with the same model (replacing just the burner comparatively too expensive). More money per yr avg, but cooks better, looks better, easier to stow.

4 Never had, nor seen, a propane BBQ flare up. Have seen charcoal flare-ups, but I agree with psneeld on that subject. Saw boats burn to the water line from Alcohol stove flare-ups, twice. Those are far more dangerous IMHO. Also seen cars with burned hoods from carb flare-ups, even without brainless added gas. ? When are boat engines (gas) going to be all fuel injection?

5 I use a 5 lb propane tank on mine, and where I keep my BBQ and tank, on the back cabin top, just aft of the main cabin, is always out of the wind when anchored, but in a raft can get windy, so can easily be moved to a more protected spot.

6 I enjoy reading most of this forum, but some degenerate to p*ssing contests that get rather tiresome.
7 ) If gasoline was discovered today it would have to be tested by EPA before adoption as a fuel and it would fail miserably. Diesel would pass with flying colors. Flare up is caused by mixing an oxygenator like air with the vapors emitted by liquid starter fluid which creates a fuel air mixture above the lower explosive limit. With C3H8 in a gaseous state as it is when emitted by the burner it mixes with the air so simply pops and is gone instantly. With charcoal the starter fluid itself will not burn until it evaporates and the vapors mixed with the oxygenator for combustion. The flare up is caused because the lighting process creates heat which then vaporizes more of the liquid starter fluid hench, flare up. The flammable range is the range of concentration in air of a substance that results in ignition. The lower explosive limit << LEL/LFL>>is the limit at which the fuel concentration in air is great enough to cause ignition. Below this concentration there is just not enough fuel in the air for ignition. The upper explosive limit<<UEL/UFL>> is the concentration at which the ignition will not occur because the % vaporized fuel in the air is to high. Many times people have started there boats, take off, only to have them suddenly blow up as a result of having a very high fuel vapor concentration in the engine room and then as the engine room is vented the concentration drops into the big bang<smile> range and ka boom!! This can never happen in a Diesel powered vessel unless gasoline is stored in the engine room for use with a dink or what ever.

8 ) Now lets talk about propane, C3H8. Propane in a gaseous form as emitted from a properly installed propane tank is heavier than air so will run down hill like water and collect in the bilge if it can reach it. Propane storage areas should always be sealed up with a drain vented to the outside of the boat. Anyone using propane on a boat should take care to insure that no propane from leaky stove refrigerator fittings can get into the bilge. Today one can install a device like the one in the link below to safeguard against ka-booming ones vessel.http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=30665&catalogId=10001&lan gId=-1&storeId=11151&storeNum=50469&subdeptNum=50517&cl assNum=50518


gasoline or liquid propane will not burn because the concentration is above the UEL Only the vapors burn
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