Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-06-2012, 05:02 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Wataworld's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Wataworld
Vessel Model: Defever 44+5
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 127
Bargins by era

I am very interested in the trawler life style! So I am shopping hard, but can not afford what I want so I am trying to scale back my desires basicly by age of vessel! So the question goes age grouping say 1990 - 1995 as one than 1996 - 2000 than 2001-5 and lastly 2006-10 primarily a passagemaker 45-55 foot, but it kinda looks like all these vessels are holding good $ not sure what their new price was versus depreciated price?
Second half of the question is about boat hours/engine hour where to be scared 500, 1500,3000, 5000 Some boats are dock queens and other are adventurers! Probably feel that adventurers have worked out the bugs but when are they worn out?
Thanks a great forum!
__________________
Advertisement

Wataworld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 06:19 AM   #2
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,534
passagemaker 45-55 foot,

If by passagemaker you mean a vessel suitable for blue water travel, crossing an ocean, the number of hulls builr in any era are minor .

The ocean duty scantlings and special construction usually price the boat 300% higher than the average "trawler".

If you are contemplating a "normal" cruiser , weather the shape should be in the shape of a "trawler" is a personal taste , but hardly required for successful cruising.

For most the on board systems should reflect the lifestyle you intend to enjoy.

Some folks like a "Dock Queen" where inexpensive equipment is common and no large battset , eutetic or efficient 12v reefer, and all sorts of batt monitoring and charging are ever needed.

The other end of the spectrum is the fully found cruiser , that only requires a dock for fuel , and perhaps water.

Its very expensive to change a queen into a cruiser, tho some will chose a 24/7 noisemaker for a summer cruise on a queen.

Depending on the style of engine hours are seldom a problem , LACK of hours , or specifically the LACK of maint between infrequent operation is a far largegr cause of engine replacement.

Far more ,,perhaps 100-1 yacht engines are KILLED , not worn out.

Look for a maint log book !
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 08:12 AM   #3
Guru
 
Portuguese's Avatar
 
City: Salvador - BA
Country: Brazil
Vessel Name: Rainha Jannota
Vessel Model: Curruira 46
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 662
Send a message via MSN to Portuguese
...Let's start with the first definition, what do you intend to do with your boat? where are you located and where do you want to go? How many people do you think will ever cruise with you?.

There are boats for every tastes and for every life plans, there are motors that I would never buy even if they were new, if I had a choice of other brands with 5000 hours on them.

There are many variabbles in this type of boat. Clean up your menu
Portuguese is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 11:04 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Wataworld's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Wataworld
Vessel Model: Defever 44+5
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 127
I live in Fort Lauderdale Fl I and my wife intend to get to know the boat and then yes only use the dock for fueling the fridge and the tanks, get out and see the world we have been locked in an office selling insurance for the last 35 years and want out!!! The questions were slated to seem like where are the better deals like in a car if you buy new the value drops fast but after 3 years it slows! I know this from my end of the buis world but I do not know on boats, on a car when it hits 100,000 miles the value drops hard again ie the question about hour. I do realize that these are diffrent but the concept should translate. We have more question but not trying to wear anybody out with our convussion!
Thanks
Wataworld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 11:54 AM   #5
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wataworld View Post
I live in Fort Lauderdale Fl I and my wife intend to get to know the boat and then yes only use the dock for fueling the fridge and the tanks, get out and see the world we have been locked in an office selling insurance for the last 35 years and want out!!! The questions were slated to seem like where are the better deals like in a car if you buy new the value drops fast but after 3 years it slows! I know this from my end of the buis world but I do not know on boats, on a car when it hits 100,000 miles the value drops hard again ie the question about hour. I do realize that these are diffrent but the concept should translate. We have more question but not trying to wear anybody out with our convussion!
Thanks
Ahoy/Howdy Wata – Welcome to TF!!

1. How much “on-water” boat experience do you and wife have... and, if you have some, in what type water... e.g. lakes, rivers, inland/protected saltwater ways, coastal cruising, cross ocean???
2. How many do you plan to be staying aboard for any length of time?
3. What price range do you feel comfortable in?
4. Being that you both were ins pros... I imagine you know how to “cut-a-deal”! Soooo... I bet you are very aware that in today’s economic climate there are sellers willing to deal! You just need to be able to well understand their boat. I suggest, find a real good marine surveyor and marine mechanic to be your eyes and ears for checking-out/knowledgably-understanding the boat you desire’s quality. Then YOU – Cut the Deal!
5. Ask questions galore here in TF and in other venues/forums of the “boating-world”. There are hundreds of us boat-nuts ready to help ya!
6. I recommend you research David Pascoe reviews and books re understanding more bout boats... take all you hear or read from anyone with a grain o’ salt! The best experience is personal experience; from what I take by your posts... you are entering upon a steep learning curve!

Good Luck and Happy Boating Daze! - Art
Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2012, 03:54 PM   #6
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
At the stage you seem to be in your boating I suggest forgetting about boat brands and models for now and define as thoroughly and realistically as possible what you want to do with a boat. Think of it like buying a computer. First figure out what software and applications you want to use, then find a computer that will do a good job of running them.

So where are you going to boat? How many people on board? Kids, old folks? Will one head or two suit your needs? Do you mind a lot of levels or is climbing up and down steps all day not something you or someone with you wants or can do? Any pets? Are you mostly going to go to marinas and docks? Do you anticipate anchoring out a lot? Will you need a source of power independent of the shore? Do you want to cook with gas or elctricity? And on and on and on.

The list you compile will broadly define the boat you need. At that point you can start looking for makes and models that meet that need.

Your budget will obviously determine what you can get. And don't forget to account for annual ownership costs in determining what you can afford. Boats don't stop costing money once you buy it. Annual ownership costs include moorage, electricity, maybe water, insurance, fuel, service and maintenance, repairs, upgrades--- basically every cost associated with owning and operating the boat except for finance payments if you finance the boat.

And while some argue this figure, a very average figure to use in accounting for the ownership costs in your budget planning is ten percent of the purchase price of the boat per year for as many years as you own the boat. Some years will be less, some will be more. The figure will vary with the condition of the boat. But unless you are buying a new or very new boat, that ten percent of the purchase price figure is a safe one to use for your initial budget calculations.

Engine hours are not nearly as relevant to an engine's condition as the way they were operated and maintained by the previous owner(s). All else being equal, I would rather buy a boat with 7,000 hours on engines I know were properly operated and maintained than a boat with 2,000 hours on engines that were, or were likely, abused or poorly maintained.

As to age or an era, I have seen boats from the 1970s that are in better shape physically and mechanically than boats from the 1990s. A lot of it has to do with the initial quality of the boat. But even more of it has to do with how the boat was treated, used, and maintained.

On our recently completed cruise in the Gulf Islands in BC we shared docks with two boats that beat any other boats I've ever seen in terms of condition. (photos below) One was a 1971 (IIRC) American Marine 49' Alaskan (American Marine also created the Grand Banks line of boats). Alaskans were all made of wood in the company's Kowloon yard but the exterior finish on this one made it look like a new fiberglass boat. And the interior was simply spectacular.

The other one was a 1975 Grand Banks 42. (GBs started in wood in Kowloon in 1966 and were switched to fiberglass in 1973 in AM's then-new Singapore yard.) It is probably the best Grand Banks I have ever seen in terms of condition, including the nice, late-model shiny ones in the big Grand Banks charter fleet in our marina.

So the year does not necessarily have any bearing on the condition of a boat.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1971 Alaskan.jpg
Views:	171
Size:	45.5 KB
ID:	13417   Click image for larger version

Name:	1975 GB42.jpg
Views:	128
Size:	62.5 KB
ID:	13418  
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 06:18 AM   #7
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,534
You want to cruise, look for a boat or ADVERTISE for a boat that is just back from a cruise.

BEWARE the never moved , that was Going to cruise , once all the owner got all the gear.

Most of the systems will be at least adaquite for a cruise and there is a chance that could be well chosen by an experienced owner.

Call the many many FL brokers and tell them just what you are looking for.

Put a Wanted add in FL Mariner , and on Craig's list.

Attempt to decide HOW you personally wish to handle the big power hog , the refrigeration system , and how many hours or days you prefer to not be forced to operate a noisemaker.

Someone elses "dream boat" cruiser may not be just what you had in mind ,but IF it worked for them it will work for you to get gone!

Electronic toys add almost nothing to the Value of a boat , as most are outdated when installed.

Commercial grade gear IS worth paying more for than yachty .
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012