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Old 07-24-2015, 08:31 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by SaltyDawg86 View Post
About 90% of the world uses a light system that's opposite of us. Why we have to be the odd man out, I have no idea.
Metric Lights??
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Old 07-24-2015, 09:59 AM   #62
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We had an old thread that has probably been deleted called "passing and being passed". Maybe it's time for another.
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Old 07-24-2015, 10:41 AM   #63
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Many of the tows I have encountered would just say pass on the one or two. They may say I'll see you on the one. I have always remembered it like this: One whistle my port side. Port one syllable. Two whistles my starboard side. Starboard two syllables. Has worked for me about 40 years.

That is pretty much my experience on the upper mis and the Illinois rivers, VHF channel 14 is what I always hail them on. Had one tow captain tell me to pass on the "black" when I was overtaking him a few years ago, I passed on his port side because it looked to be the best side to pass on. Had a tow captain last week invite me to tie up to one of his barges while both of us were waiting to lock, I really appreciated that.


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Old 07-24-2015, 10:47 AM   #64
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That is pretty much my experience on the upper mis and the Illinois rivers, VHF channel 14 is what I always hail them on. Had one tow captain tell me to pass on the "black" when I was overtaking him a few years ago, I passed on his port side because it looked to be the best side to pass on. Had a tow captain last week invite me to tie up to one of his barges while both of us were waiting to lock, I really appreciated that.


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Never heard pass on the black. I take it to mean the black/green marker side?
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Old 07-24-2015, 11:05 AM   #65
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Our marina on the lake is just above the Chickamauga locks. A private vessel has no priority, and can be held for up to 4 hours. I had gotten to know the tow boats that regularly ply our waters. We were waiting behind the tow boat John Henry for a lock up. The Capt. saw our little trawler behind, and called on the radio. He said, "China Doll come on up here. I'm going to send you up ahead of our next barge. We were home free. When the John Henry came out we ran out in our Boston Whaler with a cold case of beer for the crew.

We were one of the few boats that would regularly anchor in the coves. Running all night, the pilots would get lonesome for conversation. After they got to know us a couple coming through would call and say, "China Doll, are you around tonight". I would usually be sitting on the top deck with my hand held radio. They would talk about all sorts of things.
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Old 07-24-2015, 11:31 AM   #66
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Lots of times they are active on a ship to ship channel like 78, 80, 81... call traffic on 14 and ask what channel they are working, then hail them there.
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Old 07-24-2015, 11:36 AM   #67
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We were one of the few boats that would regularly anchor in the coves. Running all night, the pilots would get lonesome for conversation. After they got to know us a couple coming through would call and say, "China Doll, are you around tonight". I would usually be sitting on the top deck with my hand held radio. They would talk about all sorts of things.
Down along the ICW we have many Cajun tow captains. Without a doubt some of the best story tellers around. What would take us a few minutes to relate, these captains embellish and draw out the most simple stories to over an hour! Great entertainment while on the hook along the ICW!
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Old 07-24-2015, 11:36 AM   #68
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Barge passing etiquette

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Originally Posted by Giggitoni View Post
Are Canadian lights reversed from USA lights? I noticed in Europe the "red right return" thingy is reversed to "green right return". Same in Canada?

Look up 'IALA "A". Or. 'IALA "B" countries. That will fill that gap.

Www.navipedia.pl/en/naviaidsiala.html
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Old 07-24-2015, 12:27 PM   #69
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Down along the ICW we have many Cajun tow captains. Without a doubt some of the best story tellers around. What would take us a few minutes to relate, these captains embellish and draw out the most simple stories to over an hour! Great entertainment while on the hook along the ICW!
R.C.- Of course it would take a cajun that long to tell a simple story...over the VHF. You must take into account that his (or her) hands are not visible over the radio!
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Old 07-24-2015, 03:33 PM   #70
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The boats I usually pass are docked, moving in reverse, anchored, or are marked "PA" on the charts.

You must be on my boat then. EVERYTHING passes me. Heck, I was even overtaken in the Erie Canal by a one man shell! But I got him in distance!
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Old 07-24-2015, 03:41 PM   #71
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I read an article in a sailing magazine. The author was the captain of a sailboat in a regatta that circumnavigates Long Island. It was dark and early in the morning and they were becalmed and in fog. The foredeck had been trying all night to get the spinnaker to catch at least a little wind. Finally they were successful. The spinnaker had taken shape. It was just getting light and they noticed a boat was astern and gaining on them. So it made their mission even more purposeful. As the boat began to overtake them, they realized that the boat was anchored!!!! They were going backwards with the tide and their rearward motion allowed enough relative wind to fill the spinnaker!!!!
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Old 07-24-2015, 05:21 PM   #72
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You must be on my boat then. EVERYTHING passes me. Heck, I was even overtaken in the Erie Canal by a one man shell! But I got him in distance!
Kayaker keeping pace at Coot's cruising speed:



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Old 07-24-2015, 05:26 PM   #73
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I read an article in a sailing magazine. The author was the captain of a sailboat in a regatta that circumnavigates Long Island. It was dark and early in the morning and they were becalmed and in fog. The foredeck had been trying all night to get the spinnaker to catch at least a little wind. Finally they were successful. The spinnaker had taken shape. It was just getting light and they noticed a boat was astern and gaining on them. So it made their mission even more purposeful. As the boat began to overtake them, they realized that the boat was anchored!!!! They were going backwards with the tide and their rearward motion allowed enough relative wind to fill the spinnaker!!!!
Had a similar experience racing on San Francisco Bay a half-century ago when we were moving forward through the water. "Why is that boat pulling ahead? Oh, he's anchored!" We quickly followed the tactic.
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Old 07-24-2015, 05:36 PM   #74
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About 90% of the world uses a light system that's opposite of us. Why we have to be the odd man out, I have no idea.
Someone told me that during the Revolutionary War (War of 1812?), the colonists reversed the channel markers to try to confuse British ships, and it stuck. No idea if that is true.
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Old 07-24-2015, 06:30 PM   #75
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Someone told me that during the Revolutionary War (War of 1812?), the colonists reversed the channel markers to try to confuse British ships, and it stuck. No idea if that is true.
I doubt if "Red Right Returning" had anything to do with the Revolutionary War, because buoyage systems were not standardized until quite recently; you would have found red buoys to starboard in the UK as recently as the 1930's.

Prior to 1976 there were more than thirty different buoyage systems in use world-wide, many having rules in complete conflict with one another. To address these conflicting requirements, it was thought necessary as a first step to formulate two systems, one using the color red to mark the port side of the channels and the other using the color red to mark the starboard side of channels. These were called System A and System B. respectively.

The rules for System A, which included both cardinal and lateral marks, were completed in 1976 and agreed by the International Maritime Organization [IMO]. The System was introduced in 1977 and its use has gradually spread throughout Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, the Gulf and some Asian Countries.

The rules for System B were completed in early 1980. These were considered to be suitable for applicat1on in North, Central and South America. Japan, Republic of Korea and Philippines.

The rules for the two Systems were so similar that the IALA Executive Committee was able to combine the two sets of rules into one, known as "The IALA Maritime Buoyage System". This single set of rules allows Lighthouse Authorities the choice of using red to port or red to starboard, on a regional basis; the two regions being known as Region A and Region B.

Now that was probably more than anyone wanted to know about this . . . . .
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Old 07-24-2015, 09:05 PM   #76
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It would be nice if everything was standard. Everyone use Region A and all charts in meters and I bet the accidents drop some.
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Old 07-24-2015, 09:22 PM   #77
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In my pilothouse I have visual clues. It's helpful when tension is high (meeting a barge and tow in a narrow channel for instance) and if I have a visitor aboard.



With it I don't have to be smart. It's green. Two bells. And on the port side a red needle-crochet circle with one bell. Not fancy, but it works.
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Old 07-24-2015, 09:25 PM   #78
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Great idea, Janice. I might copy that one.
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Old 07-24-2015, 09:32 PM   #79
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I doubt if "Red Right Returning" had anything to do with the Revolutionary War, because buoyage systems were not standardized until quite recently; you would have found red buoys to starboard in the UK as recently as the 1930's.
You forced me to do a little research, and unfortunately (I liked the Revolutionary War explanation), it seems Congress adopted "red, right, returning" in 1850. Port buoys were black, and only changed to green in the 1970s, after Coast Guard studies showed green to be more visible.

I didn't find anything explaining how the world came to have, generally, two opposite color systems.
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Old 07-24-2015, 09:38 PM   #80
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BTW, and completely off topic, what are now green buoys used to be black on the river systems, back in the last century.
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