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Old 09-24-2014, 11:17 AM   #21
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BandB - The boat is in Portland. When we joined TF, we were living in San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico, where we will (someday) get back to.
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Old 09-24-2014, 12:26 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Our only entry to the Columbia River was calm. We were luckier than you. We got our introduction to those conditions at Grays Harbor. The swells in the Pacific are definitely different than our normal cruising area. And like you following the Charter in, we've used the Charters and commercial fishermen. My wife has referred to following them as them being "blockers". Too much football. On our Alaska trip we followed a Ferry for a good distance one day.

The next couple of days are like you encountered. In fact, a gale warning starting at 3 this afternoon. Tonight combined seas are 11 ft at 8 seconds. Tomorrow, 17 ft at 16 seconds, Thursday, wind waves 6 ft and swell 12 ft at 12 seconds. Not the kind of days you'd want to be crossing Columbia Bar.

Which is another critical part of cruising in this area. You've got to know when to fold them...stay put. Schedules fall by the wayside. There is no ICW alternative.
If your currently in Grey's or Astoria, This would be good time to rent a car and tour the Olympic Peninsula. Best time of year to see one of the most spectacular coast lines on the west coast.
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Old 09-24-2014, 01:03 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bay Pelican View Post
Took Bay Pelican out of Miami's Government cut in heavy weather to test her. Found out several things which were very important:

Some things I thought were secure were not, e.g., the stove, normally secure cabinets, older style tvs on an arm
In heavy weather in the semi-tropics if I am going to seal up the windows, need to turn on the airconditioning in advance as the pilot house got very warm
Need water at the helm as was unable to leave the helm or rely on the autopilot.
Admiral unable to handle the wheel
Need to realize won't be able to get to the head until weather clears
Need seat belt as I was tossed from helm chair
Carving of the waves is a necessity
Good points Marty.
Preparing your boat for rough water is critical. Everything than is not securely stowed become a potential to become a missile, and cause injury to yourself and crew, or to the boat itself. Heavy components can do serious damage if they slide around.
Be extra careful storing gear in the vicinity of through hulls, which can be snapped off. Tools, spare parts, oil containers in the engine room can be tossed around causing failures at the most inopportune time.
Make sure your stove, fridge, hot water tank, etc is solidly mounted.
Give a good tug on all your cabinet latches to see if they will stay shut when the contents are rolling around inside.

It can get very messy in an unsecured boat.
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Old 09-24-2014, 02:46 PM   #24
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If your currently in Grey's or Astoria, This would be good time to rent a car and tour the Olympic Peninsula. Best time of year to see one of the most spectacular coast lines on the west coast.
It is beautiful. We made a major tour through it around the first of May and have been back a couple of times since then. Of course that was long before the fall foliage. And we leave Washington in about a week so will miss the October peak. It's a lot like the NC mountains we use to go see periodically. Now we live in a land of palm trees. They don't turn.

We intend to just enjoy our tender today and do a little exploring. People make fun of how much we use our tender and how many miles we put on it.
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Old 09-24-2014, 02:52 PM   #25
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Good points Marty.
Preparing your boat for rough water is critical. Everything than is not securely stowed become a potential to become a missile, and cause injury to yourself and crew, or to the boat itself. Heavy components can do serious damage if they slide around.
Be extra careful storing gear in the vicinity of through hulls, which can be snapped off. Tools, spare parts, oil containers in the engine room can be tossed around causing failures at the most inopportune time.
Make sure your stove, fridge, hot water tank, etc is solidly mounted.
Give a good tug on all your cabinet latches to see if they will stay shut when the contents are rolling around inside.

It can get very messy in an unsecured boat.
It doesn't have to be so rough for loose items to start sliding, falling, breaking, and hitting. And when that happens, an added danger is that you hear something happened and may rush off to see what. However it happens, it distracts you from the task at hand. I'd advise minimizing these items and have an advance plan of what you'd do with any left. As an example if you have a table and chairs on the deck. Do you know where and how you're going to secure them?
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Old 09-24-2014, 10:02 PM   #26
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Moving items (was this in another thread?). that is why we are De-boarding the leather sofa & recliner. The below the holly-sol (spelling), I never thought about the thru hulls.
Great post. Thank you.
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Old 09-25-2014, 04:16 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bay Pelican View Post
Took Bay Pelican out of Miami's Government cut in heavy weather to test her. Found out several things which were very important:

Some things I thought were secure were not, e.g., the stove, normally secure cabinets, older style tvs on an arm
In heavy weather in the semi-tropics if I am going to seal up the windows, need to turn on the airconditioning in advance as the pilot house got very warm
Need water at the helm as was unable to leave the helm or rely on the autopilot.
Admiral unable to handle the wheel
Need to realize won't be able to get to the head until weather clears
Need seat belt as I was tossed from helm chair
Carving of the waves is a necessity
You really need an autopilot that can handle heavy seas. That would be my number one priority.

I wouldn't have been able to even go up and down the east coast without it.

Also at night, my ComNav has far better reactions than I.

Oh, in the day also.
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Old 09-25-2014, 07:42 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TONTOROSS View Post
Moving items (was this in another thread?). that is why we are De-boarding the leather sofa & recliner. The below the holly-sol (spelling), I never thought about the thru hulls.
Great post. Thank you.
No need to do that if they are on a nonskid surface and have relatively low center of gravity. Much more comfortable and convenient than built ins. In fact, having "real" furniture was one of Ann's musts when we were boat shopping and I am thankful for it. As newbies we learned very quickly what needed to be secured in bad seas. The two barrel chairs and the large L shape sofa were not amongst them (sat on wall to wall berber carpet). In fact they were excellent refuges of crew.

I do not recommend our method of learning what all the other things were that did move in bad conditions. It takes very little to restrain something from starting to move, for instance, a large credenza was held fast by a simple single small hook and eye twixt it and the salon wall. If we anticipated any type of seaway we developed a predeparture check list of things to stash or secure. Though a boat is equipped with stabilizers for roll, it is still susceptible to pitch, yaw and heave. Another thing to have on the list is good hand holds for all possible paths of transit.
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Old 09-25-2014, 12:10 PM   #29
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When I go out into the "big pond" I strap everything down and package up breakables. Valuable and expensive lesson lerned....
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