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Old 12-11-2015, 07:18 PM   #61
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I've always docked pointed forward. Haven't yet seen the need to do anything different.
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Old 12-11-2015, 08:47 PM   #62
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Like 90-plus percent of the boats in our large harbor we dock bow-in. However we have had occasion to want to turn the boat around in the slip to access the other side of the hull. We have a twin engine boat so it's pretty much child's play to do this. Between the use of differential thrust, opposed thrust, and the rudders it's easy to put the boat where we want it.

In fact unless wind is a factor, we often find it easier to back into or through tight places than it is to go forward. Mainly because backing let's us steer the boat accurately without the other end of the boat pivoting out to the opposite side, which of course it does if one is going forward (unless one has a bow thruster).

There are some sailboat owners on our dock who sometimes dock stern-in for whatever reason. They never seen to have any difficulty doing it despite having just the one engine and rudder. It's all about knowing how one's boat will react to thrust, rudder, and inertia.
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Old 12-11-2015, 08:52 PM   #63
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I think some here are thinking of their home slip. Well, that's easy. The real issue is every different situation you might face. We've cruised places where all docking was stern too, either med mooring or similar.

Now, the key to docking anywhere, but especially new situations and unfamiliar situations is knowing your boat as intimately as you can. Know how it responds to every possible action you can take.

As to the backing situation, since we've found ourselves forced to do so often, we're happy to have camera and to have a stern helm station.
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Old 12-11-2015, 10:27 PM   #64
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After reading Marin's post I went back to the Original Poster;s and re-read it. This thread has morphed quite a bit, but the point that has emerged is well put by Marin. We need only to know what our boats will do when we are presented with a difficult maneuver. Practice, practice, practice. Then they will indeed be child's play.

Someone mentioned Powell River. The Gov;t dock there is a good teaching ground. Narrow fairways no place to turn around, boats rafted 3 deep everywhere, and the wind, she does blow. On my sailboat (goes back a lot of years) I had to go out from one of the inner docks, stern first the whole way, in a vicious crosswind. Learned pretty fast how to make that boat go where I wanted it to go. That is the lesson we all have to learn. So avoid being caught in a tough spot, pick yourself a few good markers and practice tough maneuvers. Then when the tough spot catches you, you are ready for it.

When early in the use of a trawler with twins, I was approaching the dock at one of our Yacht club outstations, where all members are constantly told to get out there and help the incoming, so as to avoid any problems. Help wasn't what I needed, so I had to wave off more than one "helper", telling them I needed to practice. It wasn't long before I could actually approach tough docking challenges and know I was up to it.

OP: Cameras might be a nice addition, but when the tough situation arises, nothing beats a direct view. I have cameras (x3) to show me what is going on back there, on my 44' motorhome. In a tough backing situation, I don't use them, as getting out and visually assessing the situation is so much better. I don't see how it would be better on my boat, as there I can easily leave my seat and walk to a better vantage point. I can see having a view to the stern to monitor how the dinghy towing behind is handling the seas, but for assistance in docking, I doubt their usefulness.
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Old 12-11-2015, 11:45 PM   #65
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I will say...this lil lady and her line handling make me look good....in more ways than one!!!
Good grief.. if I had her on the bow I would run into the dock as I wouldnt be able to look at anything but the bow...
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Old 12-12-2015, 02:33 AM   #66
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I will say...this lil lady and her line handling make me look good....in more ways than one!!!
'dem are some big balls, Johnny!
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Old 12-12-2015, 07:03 AM   #67
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Just a reminder that all boats are different, sometimes requiring different approaches / equipment. From the pilot house helm of our Krogen 42 we have no rear vision. That is OK as long as we are going forward nose into a slip. However, I always dock from the upper helm in the rare event () that I have to abort and back up, in which case I would be blind at the lower helm. The upper helm has its disadvantages as well, lack of ability to judge how close I am, but it is still safer. With a back up camera I could dock from the lower helm knowing I could reasonably safely back up if necessary.
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Old 12-12-2015, 09:19 AM   #68
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I've always docked pointed forward. Haven't yet seen the need to do anything different.

Around here, most of the finger piers are too short to allow getting off the boat when docked bow-to.

-Chris
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Old 12-12-2015, 10:54 AM   #69
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I will say...this lil lady and her line handling make me look good....in more ways than one!!!

YEA!!! Baker,s camera has come back into focus!
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Old 12-12-2015, 01:49 PM   #70
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I have noticed that the more of those (bikini clad girls) I have on the boat the more help I have on the dock.
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Old 12-12-2015, 01:51 PM   #71
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I have noticed that the more of those (bikini clad girls) I have on the boat the more help I have on the dock.
Wifey B: Better than American Express. Don't leave home without them....
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Old 12-12-2015, 04:11 PM   #72
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Around here, most of the finger piers are too short to allow getting off the boat when docked bow-to.

-Chris
Chris: That's why I am at Hartge Yacht Harbor in Galesville. Our Defever 44 is berthed in a 60-foot slip with a full-length, 4-foot wide finger pier with pilings on the other side. Easy in, easy out, bow-to.
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Old 12-13-2015, 07:58 AM   #73
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Chris: That's why I am at Hartge Yacht Harbor in Galesville. Our Defever 44 is berthed in a 60-foot slip with a full-length, 4-foot wide finger pier with pilings on the other side. Easy in, easy out, bow-to.
I know there are some around; Herrington North has some full-length finger piers, as does Bay Bridge Marina (even floating, there)...

Is that the original Hartge, or the newer area on the way into the river? We used to keep our earlier boat in Galeseville at West River Yacht Harbor (the fuel dock place), think that was when Mast and Mallet (something like that) was where the newer Hartge place is... I remember stopping in the original Hartge place back in the early '90s, heads were spotless, with fresh flowers.... pretty impressive.

-Chris
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Old 12-13-2015, 08:34 AM   #74
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I know there are some around; Herrington North has some full-length finger piers, as does Bay Bridge Marina (even floating, there)...

Is that the original Hartge, or the newer area on the way into the river? We used to keep our earlier boat in Galeseville at West River Yacht Harbor (the fuel dock place), think that was when Mast and Mallet (something like that) was where the newer Hartge place is... I remember stopping in the original Hartge place back in the early '90s, heads were spotless, with fresh flowers.... pretty impressive.

-Chris
I don't know if it's the "original" but probably cuz there is a historical plaque which dates the marina to around 1860. To get there one has to drive past the fuel dock and Thursday's Restaraunt.
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Old 12-13-2015, 10:04 AM   #75
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I will say...this lil lady and her line handling make me look good....in more ways than one!!!
Man, Baker you have some big balls there!
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Old 12-13-2015, 11:34 AM   #76
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My line handler...

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Old 12-13-2015, 12:05 PM   #77
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I don't know if it's the "original" but probably cuz there is a historical plaque which dates the marina to around 1860. To get there one has to drive past the fuel dock and Thursday's Restaraunt.
Yeah, that's the one I think of when we were down there. To the south of main street. Nice place. Hmmm... somebody else on here that's there, too... the lady with the Elco electric boat conversion.

The newer Hartge place was a more recent acquisition, north of main street...

-Chris
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Old 12-16-2015, 11:13 PM   #78
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Worton Creek has a lot of full length piers as well. Most of the new docks and all of the covered slips have them IIRC.
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Old 12-17-2015, 08:09 PM   #79
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backing in singlehanded.

I single hand my 53 ft loa and oftten back into my slip and have done so previously with many different boats singles and twins sail and power. I have tried multiple systems and up to now the best ever is the Yacht Controller wireless system. This system is pricey but works so well it is worth it. I can walk anywhere on the boat and have full control of motors and thrusters. Actually I can walk off the boat and tie up from the dock with the boat under full control. I have been using the system now for two years and I give it a 10+ ratting and it is very rare for me to rate a marine product much above an 8. My system has an additional wired joy stick and that I never use since the small portable unit does it all so well. I understand the newer wireless units have a optional portable joy stick. I believe the unit is displayed at the Seattle boat show that is where I purchased mine. Because of the price not for everybody. However if you have a nice large boat with an expensive paint job it may pay for itself. As to which end of a boat goes into the dock first that is variable with many mitigating factors. wind -current- access to dock- power line access -view-cleat location-boats ability to maneuver etc.
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Old 12-18-2015, 07:21 PM   #80
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Around here, most of the finger piers are too short to allow getting off the boat when docked bow-to.

-Chris
Yes, I've been in situations like that. Also, bow in usually requires breaking out the longer shore power cord and draping it along the side of the boat.
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