Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-26-2016, 03:07 PM   #21
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 915
Quote:
Originally Posted by koliver View Post
The Coast Guard is definitely interested in knowing that there is a rescue taking place. You shpould always inform them of the situation, your identity, the identity of the vessel being rescued, its occupants, whether they are wearing lifejackets or PFDs, the location, your plan as the rescue is progressing, and regular updates.

Having the Coast Guard ( actually the JRCC (Joint rescue coordintion centre)) assist you by going through their check list of things you ought to be checking will ensure that you don't miss anything through excitement or lack of experience. This will also go a long way towards eliminating any concerns that you may have regarding liability, should something go wrong.

In other situations, like when you have an emergency occur on your own boat, but have handled it yourself, you should call the Coast Guard and inform them as the situation unfolds. Thier assistance promotes clear thinking and helps with the resolution of almost any situation.
Thank you very much to help me improve my skills. Next time I face this kind of situation, hopefully never, be sure I will follow your advice an d contact them.

Thanks again.
__________________
Advertisement

Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2016, 03:08 PM   #22
Guru
 
City: NC
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 600
Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
Do you mean that they crossed the Irish sea to Northern Ireland?
The North Channel is the body of water that is between Northern Ireland and Scotland, which at that point are the Mull of Kintyre and the island of Islay. The North Channel is, well north, of the Irish Sea. Not a place I would want to be in a small power boat.

If they left the port we were in, which was my impression, there is about 30 miles of water to the closest part of Northern Ireland with some pretty nasty tides along the way. But I think they went to Ballycastle which was about 40 miles one way.

At least they had a radio and they could get the Coast Guard to send out the lifeboat.

Later,
Dan
__________________

dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2016, 03:54 PM   #23
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cygnus
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
Often, depending on sea conditions, going along side a quarter, with fendering, is the easiest way to control a dead boat.
Good point. Know how to rig lines for a "hip tow" and get the stern of the towed vessel well ahead of your rudder or outboard/outdrive. This allows you much better maneuvering. The "tow strap" is a line from your mid cleat to the towed vessel's stern. That's the one that should take the strain. Bow and stern lines just keep the boats together. A fourth line, running from your stern to the towed vessel's mid cleat, allows you to back up when needed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou_tribal View Post
Should I let the coast guard know that I am helping them and towing them if they didn't call the coast guard for help in the first place?
By all means. They'll do whatever they can to help out. Sometimes you need someone on shore to make phone calls or help find a safe port. I towed a fishing vessel into a Canadian port earlier this season, and kept comms with the CG the whole time. They appreciated it.

I've also heard that the thing about whose line to use is a myth. I use my own lines because I know what I'm dealing with. I'm no lawyer, but in my mind I'm taking on some additional responsibility for the towed vessel and passengers. I take that seriously. It also has a calming effect when they know you know what you're doing.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2016, 04:16 PM   #24
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 13,891
My recommendation is to not hip tow unless in protected waters...even wakes of only 1-2 feet can get 2 boat in a crunching and slamming mode. Dangerous for people and boats. Of course the size of boats matters.


The only way to prevent that is tight lines and big fenders.

If you are not equipped or experienced in it...I don't recommend it. Stern to and let the boat anchor up near safety or stern tow to a long open dock.

If you have a yacht finish and want it to stay that way...again...I recommend only a stern tow.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2016, 06:18 PM   #25
Moderator Emeritus
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 6,599
Well done. You might question now whether you could have done it differently or better, but I`d say you did assess the situation at the time, whether you realized you were doing it or not. And, you must have got it sufficiently right, because it worked. Not to say a good debrief and reconsideration is not a fine idea, I`m sure it is.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2016, 06:27 PM   #26
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 915
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
My recommendation is to not hip tow unless in protected waters...even wakes of only 1-2 feet can get 2 boat in a crunching and slamming mode. Dangerous for people and boats. Of course the size of boats matters.


The only way to prevent that is tight lines and big fenders.

If you are not equipped or experienced in it...I don't recommend it. Stern to and let the boat anchor up near safety or stern tow to a long open dock.

If you have a yacht finish and want it to stay that way...again...I recommend only a stern tow.
I tend to agree with you. I was not too worried about towing the boat from stern. The admiral was at the vigie looking if everything was fine. I ordered her to keep a knife on reach in case anything went wrong to cut the tow line. I made particular attention not to increase thrust too fast so the tow line was not under stress. My only worry and concern was about wakes from other boat as here on the river I am cruising, a lot of cruiser are just going fast as hell ignoring the impact of their wake which is very annoying. Fortunaly for us there was very very few boat out there this day.
I understand the advise to tow the boat side by side but novice as I am I would not be confortable doing this. Moreover the shape of my hull would make this very difficult as the forward third of the length as a very deep "curve" (sorry don't know how to describe this correctly) which would have made this type of towing difficult.

Thank you all for your advices, I certainly got more knowledge than ever on the subject now!
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2016, 04:55 AM   #27
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,251
Rather than attempting to dock a tow , its far easier to get them near the marina and let them anchor.

I prefer to tow with their anchor line , so I am able to put them where I want easily.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2016, 06:38 PM   #28
Member
 
City: Southampton
Country: Bermuda
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 22
Other aspects that I don't think have been mentioned so far are:
1. Do you void your boats insurance coverage by towing?
2. Most boats aren't designed or setup for towing especially common cleat installations
There are numerous aspects to consider, not least of which are your own capabilities and experience, the sea/ weather conditions, the strengths and weaknesses of the two boats, I edition to the unknown.
Therefore caution can be the best approach ensuring safety of life and limb on both boats until the pros arrive with appropriately designed Ned equipped boats. I think in the US where the legal system is so conducive to suage this is important.
Recb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2016, 07:09 PM   #29
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recb View Post
I think in the US where the legal system is so conducive to suage this is important.
Nope. This is the exact reason the Good Samaritan rule was brought in. Maritime law is pretty exacting versus land lubber law.
menzies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2016, 07:14 PM   #30
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 13,891
my interpretation of maritime law is just the opposite....it is so conditional, everything winds up in maritime court.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2016, 09:27 PM   #31
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recb View Post
I think in the US where the legal system is so conducive to suage this is important.
sp
__________________
Keith
koliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 09:48 PM   #32
Veteran Member
 
City: Orange Beach, AL
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 38
A coupla years ago some guys in a sportfisher tried to cross a flat near our dock and grounded hard. We worked hard on the boat and finally pulled it off the flat.

I would never do that again. Broke 2 lines and stressed my engines. I should have offered to call Sea Tow for them.

Your situation is very different though. Limited options for the stranded boater. I'd have done the same as safely as possible.
hjorgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 08:21 AM   #33
Guru
 
LaBomba's Avatar
 
City: Beaverton, Ontario
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Airswift
Vessel Model: Ontario Yachts Great Lakes 33
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 724
One question for the forum not covered here so far I don't think. Would you, the coast guard or a towing service transfer all souls to the towing boat or all but one to steer the towed boat, or would they all just leave them on their own boat? I would feel safer having them on board.
__________________
Allan & Ann
Airswift
LaBomba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 08:39 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
Bigsfish's Avatar
 
City: Miami River
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gotcha
Vessel Model: Grand Banks. Heritage. 43
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 374
I think the answer would be situational dependent: sea conditions, sea worthiness of the boat to be towed, distance to be towed, ect. No one easy answer.
Bigsfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 08:44 AM   #35
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cygnus
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,161
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBomba View Post
One question for the forum not covered here so far I don't think. Would you, the coast guard or a towing service transfer all souls to the towing boat or all but one to steer the towed boat, or would they all just leave them on their own boat? I would feel safer having them on board.
The answer is, as always, "it depends."

Assuming a routine tow, it's safer to leave passengers and crew where they are than to transfer them between boats. I think that's what you'll find the CG and towing services doing 99% of the time.

Exceptions would be if they're getting hypothermic or have another serious medical condition, or if the towed vessel is at risk of fire or sinking.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 10:41 AM   #36
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,873
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptTom View Post
The answer is, as always, "it depends."

Assuming a routine tow, it's safer to leave passengers and crew where they are than to transfer them between boats. I think that's what you'll find the CG and towing services doing 99% of the time.

Exceptions would be if they're getting hypothermic or have another serious medical condition, or if the towed vessel is at risk of fire or sinking.

Every situation must be assessed on its own facts. Not every towing boat will have the space to take the passengers aboard, not every person on a distressed boat will be in panic mode, or otherwise need to be under close supervision, not every boat will tow well without a crew on board.
Occasionally, a rescuer will need to operate the distressed boat while it is under tow, or will need to go aboard to properly secure the towline, and will elect to remain aboard to help while being towed. The crew of the distressed boat may be more in his or her way than if removed to the towing boat.
There is no "one size fits all" answer.
__________________
Keith
koliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 11:06 AM   #37
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 13,891
I rarely in 13 years of assistance towing transferred the people.

Depended on the conditions, both environmental and the towed vessel.

If the environmental conditions warrant removing the people from the towed boat...you better be one dang good tower yourself and be well equipped to tow.

Plus, at sea transfers even under really good conditions are usually dangerous.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2016, 12:11 PM   #38
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 915
When this occured to me I choose not to ask them to transfer to my ship for different reasons. First I did not want to try to manoeuver to tie my boat to their one as I was not used to do it. Second I wanted not to try to transfer people as their boat was a small cruiser that has no bridge around it (don't know how to describe it), the only way for them to get out was from aft in other words. Lastly I did not want to take the risk to see one of them fall overboard knowing that their boat was not damaged or taking water.
I still not sure if I should or shouldn't but I was evaluating my options at that time and took a decision knowing I did not have much if any experience regarding assistance.
__________________

Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012