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Old 05-10-2019, 06:25 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Trawlerx07 View Post
I'm definitely going to sticking close to dock area for a while until I am comfortable going out farther.



.


A lot of us may find the dock area the least comfortable place.

Its like hanging around the car park.
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:16 AM   #22
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Beautiful looking vessel

Lots of good suggestions above already. Some thoughts, my opinion.

When you get the survey there is always room to negotiate on the price based on what is found. I tend to focus on items that you would expect to be fully functional even in that age boat, and be careful not to nickle and dime - it is a 50 year old boat. If the through-hulls need replacing, that can be asked for, if there are hairline cracks in the fiberglass (and thats all they are, then to be expected).

Your surveyor WILL find a list of things. Don't let that necessarily dissuade you. Talk to him one on one after the survey on his initial findings and then when you get the written report. Get engines surveyed as well, including engine and transmission fluid analysis. Some of what you will read may concern you but it is the surveyors job to be thorough, so he is going to note everything that he finds - ask him for his "seriousness" assessment. He may tell you to discuss one or three things with a specialist.

As to handling. I always ask folks moving from a single to twins if they remember the old Atari Tank game? You can still play this on line though not the same without the console paddles! That game will give you the overall idea of how twins will behave. Yes, you need to consider wind and current, but after a while you will actually work out how to use these to help you in most cases.

Walk your current dock. Is there someone on there who you can ask to help you bring the boat back and give you handling advice. Stop along the way is a good spot for "playing" with the boat, spinning it, turning in forward, reverse etc. Secondary benefit is having his sig other there to help your wife at the slip.

One other thought, though you probably already know this from your sail boat. Marine engines/transmissions are designed to be bumped in and out of gear, so don't be afraid to do so as often as you need. You don't need to aim your boat at the slip and ram it in in one move!

Talk to your marina and see if you can get a t-head to start with, laying alongside initially will help with your confidence.

All the best and enjoy her.
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Old 05-10-2019, 10:06 AM   #23
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Two quick points to keep in mind. First, very few banks or credit unions will make a loan for a live aboard. Buy the boat first before selling the house. Once you have a loan on the boat THEN put the house on the market.

Second, make darn sure you have moorage prearranged and that the marina allows you to live aboard. At our marina there are currently eleven people on the wait list for live aboard slips. In our neighborhood most marinas limit the number of live aboard to 10% of the total slips. And be aware there are generally additional charges and fees for live aboard.
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Old 05-10-2019, 10:23 AM   #24
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Any advice going forward?
May your wallet stay fat!

Enjoy!
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Old 05-10-2019, 10:56 AM   #25
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Boat looks nice in the photos. As others have said, keep in mind that it will be difficult to find financing and maybe insurance. Donít tell them that you want to live aboard. If you are able to get financing you will have to have insurance so check before you buy that you and get insurance on the boat and with your boating experience. You donít want to get the boat and then not be able to get insurance. Then find a live aboard slip as in some areas they are almost impossible to find, in other areas they may be readily available. Anyway, good luck and have fun.
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Old 05-10-2019, 01:06 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Steppe View Post
Two quick points to keep in mind. First, very few banks or credit unions will make a loan for a live aboard. Buy the boat first before selling the house. Once you have a loan on the boat THEN put the house on the market.

Second, make darn sure you have moorage prearranged and that the marina allows you to live aboard. At our marina there are currently eleven people on the wait list for live aboard slips. In our neighborhood most marinas limit the number of live aboard to 10% of the total slips. And be aware there are generally additional charges and fees for live aboard.
I got an unsecured loan from lightstream @ a really good interest rate.

You have to have good credit but they don't care what you use the money for.
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Old 05-17-2019, 02:09 PM   #27
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1. Get rid of pride
2. The other guy always has right of way
3. When in doubt find a bigger boat and follow him
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Old 05-17-2019, 02:31 PM   #28
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On a used boat (any boat for that matter), there are only 3 states of any piece of equipment:

1) About to fail
2) Not working
3) Just replaced

Start using stuff. Once it fails, start researching, take it apart, fix it. At the end of the journey, you'll know that piece of equipment inside and out, whether you eventually fixed it or replaced it. There is almost never a shortage of things to work on on a boat.
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Old 05-17-2019, 04:19 PM   #29
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79 Albin 43

I've had the good fortune to view the boat in person (and even made an offer on it, but eventually decided not to pursue it).

Yes, the pictures look wonderful. But the pictures don't show many of the little things...

The engine room was WONDERFUL!! That was the best part of the boat.

The problem for me was that all of the woodwork on the outside of the boat needed a LOT of work. To an extent - this is cosmetic. Stuff still functioned.
Going inside, there were a LOT of issues all over the boat where leaks had rotted wood, that I would want to repair / replace. Again - much of this is cosmetic (more or less). This is *assuming* there are no *current* leaks - which is a little trickier to tell, since the boat was in a covered slip.

If you don't care what the boat looks like, and are going to just run it around and enjoy learning how to handle a Trawler - then this might not be a bad boat - Assuming the bottom job is ok...

I'm a little OCD - and would want to spend the next 2 years reworking all of the exterior woodwork, and then spend the next 2 years after that redoing everything inside... But that's my demon to deal with, and part of why I walked away from that boat.

The layout was wonderful. The lines are great.

Best of luck either way you go, and feel free to contact me off list. I'd be happy to chat with you.
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Old 05-17-2019, 04:36 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrew View Post
On a used boat (any boat for that matter), there are only 3 states of any piece of equipment:

1) About to fail
2) Not working
3) Just replaced

Start using stuff. Once it fails, start researching, take it apart, fix it. At the end of the journey, you'll know that piece of equipment inside and out, whether you eventually fixed it or replaced it. There is almost never a shortage of things to work on on a boat.
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Old 05-17-2019, 06:02 PM   #31
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New owner here as well.

I am new to the big boat world as well. I just bought a 1987 Sea Ray 41. Although it is not a true trawler by definition it still has the same systems as a trawler. I plan on cruiser her at trawler speeds.

I just completed my purchase this week. My boat was originally for sale for $55,000 and we agreed on a price of 46,000. There were somethings wrong with the boat that the seller fixed including three house batteries, bilge pump and a broken AC fan in the aft cabin. I had the engine surveyed by a Diesel engine surveyor and a regular boat surveyor. I thought this was critical to my purchase and I would suggest that you do the same. I am a little overwhelmed by all of the systems in the boat and look forward to learning them one by one. My surveyor went over most of all the equipment but I am nowhere near ready to understand at all. I wish you the best of luck with your purchase
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Old 05-18-2019, 07:12 AM   #32
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1. Identify make/model number of every system on board (engines, gears, AC, water pumps, coffeemaker, whatever) and then acquire a softcopy manual for that... to have available on your ship's laptop/tablet/whatever...

2. Assuming you'll want to do some (most?) of your own work, gradually learn how to service/maintain each of those systems.

3. Learn everything you can about using spring lines to dock...

4. Use the boat as often as you can...

-Chris
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Old 05-18-2019, 07:26 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
1. Identify make/model number of every system on board (engines, gears, AC, water pumps, coffeemaker, whatever) and then acquire a softcopy manual for that... to have available on your ship's laptop/tablet/whatever...

2. Assuming you'll want to do some (most?) of your own work, gradually learn how to service/maintain each of those systems.

3. Learn everything you can about using spring lines to dock...

4. Use the boat as often as you can...

-Chris
Good points Chris. Using the boat is so important. I'm making a concerted effort to take my new boat out at LEAST once a week. During the week Im so busy with my career but I'm planning to go out at least once every weekend.

Boats need to be used. A dock queen is a certain recipe for premature aging and repairs.
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Old 05-18-2019, 10:20 AM   #34
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Lots of older threads have explored this subject, but this one has generated the best concentration of good advice.

Moving to twins for the first time, whether you get an instructor or not, you need some quiet time with your twins and a dock. Tell any "helpers" on the dock that you need the uninterrupted practice time and do just that. Preferably on a dock that is away from other distractions, working up to docking in current and/or wind, from different directions.
You will master the skill faster this way, then will avoid embarrassment when you can come into any dock, in any conditions and land without losing paint.
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Old 05-18-2019, 03:38 PM   #35
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Lots of older threads have explored this subject, but this one has generated the best concentration of good advice.

Moving to twins for the first time, whether you get an instructor or not, you need some quiet time with your twins and a dock. Tell any "helpers" on the dock that you need the uninterrupted practice time and do just that. Preferably on a dock that is away from other distractions, working up to docking in current and/or wind, from different directions.
You will master the skill faster this way, then will avoid embarrassment when you can come into any dock, in any conditions and land without losing paint.

Great advice koliver.

Just because someone has received instruction doesn't mean the learning stops. I advise boaters to practice what was learned in a situation similar to what you outlined.
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Old 05-19-2019, 11:48 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrew View Post
On a used boat (any boat for that matter), there are only 3 states of any piece of equipment:

1) About to fail
2) Not working
3) Just replaced

Start using stuff. Once it fails, start researching, take it apart, fix it. At the end of the journey, you'll know that piece of equipment inside and out, whether you eventually fixed it or replaced it. There is almost never a shortage of things to work on on a boat.
To add to that excellent input:

Starting with the survey report as a To Do list, keep it going. When you discover something that's not working properly, or simply not to your liking, add it to the list. It is likely to get longer, not shorter, even as you knock out projects, but that's OK - at least you'll never forget all the things you want to do.

You can also use the list to be more efficient in your projects. When you tackle a bilge project, for example, your list will help you see all the things you should do in that area while you're there.

I also keep a maintenance log, of virtually every fix, upgrade, modification, etc., in some detail. It helps me remember what I did when and how, and (I think) will be valuable to whoever owns the boat after me.
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Old 05-19-2019, 06:56 PM   #37
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Don't hit the docks
Don't hit the rocks.


Collect experience--do what is comfortable but expand your envelope comfortably.
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Old 05-19-2019, 07:47 PM   #38
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Don't hit other boats.
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Old 05-19-2019, 08:59 PM   #39
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Don't hit the docks
Don't hit the rocks.


Collect experience--do what is comfortable but expand your envelope comfortably.

Agreed.
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Old 05-19-2019, 10:49 PM   #40
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Rule 1.
Quote:
Originally Posted by syjos View Post
Don't hit other boats.
Rule 2.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktdtx View Post
Don't hit the docks
Don't hit the rocks.
Have good insurance in case Rules 1 and 2 are broken.

Both times my boat has been in an accident, it came out of the yard better than before the event. Once was my fault, running aground on a piling in the middle of nowhere. The other was an allision with a 60 Hatt while anchored. (Yes, my anchor held us both in the SF Bay Slot during Fleet Week's crowded waters!)

Sometimes, sh!t happens. It just happens...
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