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Old 03-08-2015, 03:17 PM   #1
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Another good reason to get rid of chain...

Would be nice to eliminate this ugly perpetual rust stain from the anchor locker drain. When recovering the anchor, what is the procedure going from rope to chain on the windlass? Just had to add the picture of a "serious" boat that passed by.
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Old 03-08-2015, 03:29 PM   #2
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What procedure?

The rope has one or two turns on the drum and when the anchor is in its roller the chain stopper is kicked to lock the 3-6 ft of chain aboard.

DONE
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Old 03-08-2015, 04:11 PM   #3
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Would be nice to eliminate this ugly perpetual rust stain from the anchor locker drain.
The PO of my boat glued pieces of hose to the through hulls to keep AC discharge off the hull. Don't know how that would hold up closer to the bow, but it might work.

M[/URL]b
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Old 03-08-2015, 05:17 PM   #4
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I put those pieces of plastic hose in my discharge outlets. It's a simple job and the only reason they seem to get knocked out is if they get hit by a fender. Here are two pics of them. First is the cut piece of hose and the second is the installed piece.





I would think they'd work well near the bow where finders won't be knocking them out.
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Old 03-08-2015, 05:40 PM   #5
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The procedure would be that once you pull up enough line that you get to where the chain starts you need to transfer from using the capstan to pull up the line to using the wildcat to continue pulling up the chain.

(I just noticed you have a horizontal windlass. That's more of a challenge when it comes to switching from pulling the the line to pulling the chain. In your case you'd have to lift the chain over to the wildcat. Unless you can get a combination line/chain wildcat.)

Depending on what style of windlass you have sometimes you can push the chain down with your foot so it starts to feed into the wildcat.

Transitioning from the line to the chain can be a PITA and potentially dangerous T&M you hands.

A better solution might be to clean out your chain locker, add the tubes to your drain and get new chain.
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Old 03-08-2015, 07:37 PM   #6
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For the few times we anchor, getting rid of 600 pounds of weight in the bow is enticing.
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Old 03-08-2015, 08:23 PM   #7
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ancora that largish bow wave will get smaller. It's coming half way up to the cap rail.
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Old 03-08-2015, 08:44 PM   #8
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I'm bow light. Wouldn't bother me to have several hundred pounds more of chain if I saw the need for more rode. The Coot's anchor-compartment drain outlet is at waterline, so exterior hull rust stains from the anchor chain are not applicable.
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Old 03-09-2015, 12:31 AM   #9
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The stain is likely a mix of rust and mud, latter probably hastens the former. Spray washing anchor and rode on retrieve helps. Soon after buying a previous boat I found literally inches of mud at the bottom of the unusually deep anchor locker, hiding thick diamond pattern rubber matting. Pressure washer got rid of it.
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Old 03-09-2015, 01:44 AM   #10
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To transfer from the line capstan to the chain gipsy, bring in the line untioll the chain just touches the capstan.

Then using a short line which is attached to the cleat on your windlass that has a clevis hook at the end...

grab the chain with the clevis hook.

Then you can release the line from the capstan and calmly put the chain on the gipsy.
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Old 03-09-2015, 12:24 PM   #11
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Thank you for that method of switching from line to chain on the windlass. Sounds feasible to me. Yes, the ol' girl does run "bow down." Don't know how detrimental it is but we do not take anything more than a light spray in 6' (my limit)seas.
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Old 03-09-2015, 12:52 PM   #12
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mmmm and I just ordered 550 ft of 5/16 BBB chain for the inside passage trip at $3.19 a foot.
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Old 03-09-2015, 01:21 PM   #13
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Alaskan: i hope you bought it online from china. I hear it's all the same
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Old 03-09-2015, 02:00 PM   #14
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My boat maybe from that part of the world, but my chain will be American made baby!!!!
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Old 03-09-2015, 04:13 PM   #15
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Yes, the ol' girl does run "bow down." Don't know how detrimental it is but we do not take anything more than a light spray in 6' (my limit)seas.
From your avatar photo your boat doesn't look bow down to me. It looks pretty much level. Water has a strange habit of moving when you push something through it. The water coming up on either side of your bow looks pretty like every other boat I see cruising around other than planing boats or semi-planng running at speed. How far up the water comes depends on speed and the shape of the hull. But I would by no means consider your boat to be plowing based on your photo.

This is our boat at eight knots and our boat has a much finer entry than yours, again judging by your photo. So the water is not pushed as high on either side of our bow by the forward motion of the boat.

And we've got 200' of chain stored right behind the stem.
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Old 03-09-2015, 05:50 PM   #16
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... How far up the water comes depends on speed and the shape of the hull. ..
The Coot's bow isn't as fine as Marin's GB so the water comes up higher (here at 6.3 knots), and the Coot is slightly bow-light despite 200 feet of 3/8" chain.

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Old 03-09-2015, 08:34 PM   #17
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Marin you seem to have some weight hanging of the extreme stern. What do you figure the dinghy and motor weigh? Coot is going to plough along at 6+ no mater what you put in the chain locker or on the stern. The bow wave reminds me of a tug going at max speed all the water is pushed forward most likely a full FD hull.
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Old 03-09-2015, 08:50 PM   #18
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A 9' Livingston weighs about 160 pounds. The outboard weighs about 40 pounds. When we mounted the dinghy and motor some six months after buying the boat we did not notice any appreciable change in trim. If there was a change it was probably less than an inch judging by the narrow strip of bottom paint that has always shown between the water's surface and the bottom of the boot stripe.

The trim is changed more by the amount of water in the fresh water tanks. From full to empty (170 gallons) it changes the amount of bottom paint above the water level at the stern by an inch and a half by measurement.
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Old 03-09-2015, 09:12 PM   #19
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mmmm and I just ordered 550 ft of 5/16 BBB chain for the inside passage trip at $3.19 a foot.
Yep, I've got the same thing sitting in the back of my pickup.

Im in Seward this week to play on the boat but the wind is 25 knots and its 20 degrees or so right now so im doing inside jobs, and staying warm.
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Old 03-09-2015, 09:23 PM   #20
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Marin West marine lists 5/16 chain at .95lb/foot and 3/8 at 1.4lb/foot so your dinghy and motor could account for balancing up to 200 foot of chain in the bow. The weight in the extreme ends of the boat have the longest fulcrum in affecting for and aft attitude and hobby horse tendency. Even when balanced those end of fulcrum weights have detrimental affects which of course may not be apparent unless we talk Americas cup or other race and performance oriented craft.
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