Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-06-2016, 11:50 AM   #1
Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Country: Canada
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 11
Alrighty then ....

Looking to buy a trawler, and so far what's fitting my build is the Mainship 40, I will be doing my boating from New York to the Georgian bay. The wife and I like the layout of the Mainship 40 and I especially like the price. Anything from 1998 to 2006 below 200K . The thing is I kinda like speed and I presently have a fast 35 footer cruiser. Is there such a thing as a relatively fast cruising trawler? Any suggestions will be appreciated ..
__________________
Advertisement

Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 12:00 PM   #2
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,080
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigs View Post
Looking to buy a trawler, and so far what's fitting my build is the Mainship 40, I will be doing my boating from New York to the Georgian bay. The wife and I like the layout of the Mainship 40 and I especially like the price. Anything from 1998 to 2006 below 200K . The thing is I kinda like speed and I presently have a fast 35 footer cruiser. Is there such a thing as a relatively fast cruising trawler? Any suggestions will be appreciated ..
First, give us your definition of "fast".

"Speed" and "trawler" seem to me to be mutually exclusive. You can definitely find very nice boats in the 38-50' range that will go fast. There are some that are very affordable as well (do a quick yachtworld search for Bayliners). There are plenty of folks here that have fast boats that are definitely not "trawlers" using anyone's definition, but still live what might be considered the "trawler" lifestyle.

Finally, give us an idea of what is prompting you to want to move from your 35' cruiser to a larger boat?
__________________

__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 12:24 PM   #3
Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Country: Canada
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 11
Well I can hit 50 mph with my cruiser and I like the speed the fuel consumption not so much. I'm entering retirement age so I think I'll be ready to ease off throttle. I just dont know if I can handle 8 knots , 15 knots seems like a cruising speed I can get used to. The plan is in two years, sell the cruiser, do a European vacation next summer then get my trawler for the summer of 2018..
Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 12:39 PM   #4
Guru
 
cardude01's Avatar
 
City: Victoria TX
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bijou
Vessel Model: 2008 Island Packet steadysailer
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,167
Alrighty then ....

You're really gonna hate the fuel burn at 15 knots in a Mainship 40 as well, if it even goes that fast.

Maybe look at a PDQ 34 Cat? Good speed and economy.
cardude01 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 12:45 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Islanddreamer's Avatar
 
City: Kingsville, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Ride
Vessel Model: Albin 36 D/C Hull 46 Dec 1978
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 224
You will have to get used to everyone else getting there before you. Does take some getting used to, but I focus now on the journey and the amount of helm time. 1800 RPM / 3GPH / 9.6 MPH here with a single 120HP Lehman. It's faster going with the wind and tide...

It has become therapeutic at a slower pace. Nothing happens too quickly it and has tended to lower the stress level and blood pressure.
__________________
Any day aboard is a good day.
Islanddreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 12:54 PM   #6
Guru
 
alormaria's Avatar
 
City: Trenton
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 901
As the owner of ye ol' yacht brokerage used to say ", Sure, this boat will do 15 knots". Then under his breath, "If you drop it off a cliff".

Some of the Sabre "Fast" trawlers might get up to speed without the cliff, but then there is the fuel consumption and the price to climb over.
__________________
Al Johnson
34' Marine Trader
"Angelina"
alormaria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 01:01 PM   #7
Guru
 
Tad Roberts's Avatar
 
City: Flattop Islands
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Blackfish
Vessel Model: custom
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 707
Eastbay, Sabre, Pacific Seacraft 38T, Cape Dory, Wilbur, there are lots.....

Eastbay are particularly well made.....

1996 Eastbay 40 Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
Tad Roberts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 01:38 PM   #8
Guru
 
Hawgwash's Avatar
 
City: Sidney
Country: Canada
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 2,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tad Roberts View Post
Eastbay, Sabre, Pacific Seacraft 38T, Cape Dory, Wilbur, there are lots.....
Tad, I had not heard of the PS 38 until now. With the exception of Crealock's transition to the Offshore MY, I have always been leery of sailboat boys who take a run at power boat building.

Why did this one not survive?
Hawgwash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 02:25 PM   #9
Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Country: Canada
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 11
Nice thanks alot for the replies, I got some research to do, seeing the numerous boats listed in this thread... So to clear up things, the Mainship 40 is like a 10 knot cruising speed?
Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 03:04 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 186
Tigs,
Welcome aboard! As a reference for you the FLOSCAN on our 88 Mainship shows about 8 GPH at around 12 MPH. statue. 454 gas burners. Previous owner claims to have had the props sized to maximize economy in the 1800-2000 RPM range. 10-12 MPH. I do not recall what pitch and diameter they are. did not see that in the log book. and max speed i have seen on the GPS was 29 MPH. That was way too fast for me, gas burn was large of course.
Lots of good advice above and of course we all have opinions.
Enjoy the search and as most will advise, do not get in a hurry in your selection(s). Took me 3 years to understand WHAT it was exactly that i wanted. Looked and LOTS of boats. figured it out and LOVE what we selected.
You will too. Cheers
Dave
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 03:19 PM   #11
Guru
 
Tad Roberts's Avatar
 
City: Flattop Islands
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Blackfish
Vessel Model: custom
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawgwash View Post
Tad, I had not heard of the PS 38 until now. With the exception of Crealock's transition to the Offshore MY, I have always been leery of sailboat boys who take a run at power boat building.

Why did this one not survive?
Not sure what you're referring to? Sailboat builders can't do powerboats or sailboat designer's can't do powerboats

Like all yacht building stories the Pacific Seacraft one is really complex and no doubt someone else has a completely different take on events. In the mid-late 1990's Pacific Seacraft was contracted by Nordhavn to build the new 40's. They (PS management) saw these boats selling well and wanted a powerboat line of their own. We (Bruce King Yacht Design) were already connected through Gene Kolman, general manager of PS, as he and his brother had run Ericson Yachts forever. So, knee-jerk fashion, they had us do a few proposals. The hull was a scaled version of a 40 knot sportfishermen I'd done years before. The boat was too short to make a good aft cabin and still get the engines far enough aft to obtain the high speed envisioned. I disagreed with virtually every other design decision made, but design by committee is like that. The result is not a happy boat though it's attractive. It was introduced at way too low a price, the first 5 were sold quickly but cost far more to build than PS sold them for. And that continued, with cost spiraling up, the industry changing rapidly, and fewer new boats selling. PS was soon out of business (that version of the company).
Tad Roberts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 03:26 PM   #12
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,187
I've come the believe there are two fundamental types of cruising: hub and spoke cruising, and point to point cruising. Hub and spoke is when you are based in a particular location, and go on trips from there, and returning there. Point-to-point cruising is when you are going on a longer adventure and will be traveling point to point for weeks if not months or years on end.

I think speed is very important when you are doing hub and spoke cruising because it significantly increases your cruising range, i.e. how far you can go over the course of a weekend or week off from work. If you have a slow boat, you can't get very far.

But doing point-to-point cruising we have found speed to be much less important. Our first long cruise, which went along much the same route that you are planning (I think), we found ourselves running at 8-10 kts all but a few days, even though our boat could go 20 kts. Enjoying the scenery, and being able to move comfortable around the boat was much more important than getting somewhere a couple of hours earlier. As a result of this experience, we switched from a 20+kt boat to an 8-9 kts boat and rarely miss the speed.

I bring this up only because it sounds like you are about to make the change from hub and spoke to point-to-point, so might want to consider this. Another related consideration is on canals where there are often speed limits, and even when there are not, you can race to the next lock and will sit and wait for the other boats to catch up before they will lock you through. It's like racing to the next stop light only to see the slow pokes pull up next to you.

Anyway, food for thought.
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 04:15 PM   #13
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,630
My criteria is in line with yours. You can power a MS40 to go fast. I have seen them with twins and they will do a good turn of speed. The problem is the MS hull is not really optimized for planing. MS built boats from the "inside out". Meaning they were going for interior volume and they worried about hull design later. IOW, they are not easily driven hulls. A twin MS40 up on plane would likely get less than a mile per gallon. I have seen MS43s with QSM Cummins at about 550 per engine. Again, you are likely burning 30-40gph to do 20 knots.

Trust me, I have been through all iterations. You could look into the Sabres and East Bays...if your budget will support it. They are not cheap boats but they are damn nice boats and were built to plane from the outset. I honestly don't know what they burn but it will still sting.

If you are on more of a budget, look into the bigger Carvers....and before they went all weird and Volvo and shit. The late 90s and early 2000s. The 445 models...something like that....they were fairly heavily built and were Cummins powered. They are quite happy doing 8 knots and can easily cruise in the upper teens.

Anyway, I am not retired so I need to speed to cover longer distances in my "hub and spoke" style of cruising. I will most definitely slow down when I retire and cruise farther afield.
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2016, 07:51 AM   #14
Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Country: Canada
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 11
wow I have been pulled side to side, I read one post and I see the sense of it, then I read another and I'm pulled into another direction. I'm kinda confused but I also know the purchase is not before two years so alot of things might change. I have come to the realization that I'll still be in a "hub to point" situation because even though I'm retiring soon I still have young children. I'm doing the golden triangle this summer, leaving for three weeks. Montreal, Ottawa. Rideau canal, Kingston , thousand island and back to Montreal. we are three boats and one of them is a slow moving Carver. i think it will tell me much as to what direction I'll be heading after doing that trip.
Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2016, 08:54 AM   #15
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,187
Thats an awesome trip, and should give you a chance to experience going more slowly, and see how often you yearn for speed.
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2016, 09:28 AM   #16
Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Country: Canada
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
Thats an awesome trip, and should give you a chance to experience going more slowly, and see how often you yearn for speed.
exactly !!!
Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2016, 10:57 AM   #17
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,131
We came from 50+ knots, lake boating, and for us 35-40 knots was slowing down. I'd recommend some chartering of different type boats. We chartered one 12 knot boat and while the boat was incredible, we couldn't live with the speed. We found a 20 knot cruise to be the slowest we were comfortable with. That was still a huge step. 7-8 knots just wouldn't work for us, nothing wrong with it, just not for us.

I don't think those who haven't come from faster boats fully appreciate the issue you're facing. You may need to think outside the trawler box a bit. Sea Ray is definitely an option, although the express styling not as conducive to long range cruising. Still much more space than you are use to and Sundancers are very good for your cruising grounds. Eastbay and the type are worth considering. Sabre. But also Hatteras, Viking and others of that ilk. Then if you want to think outside the box, look at boats like Sunseeker, Princess, etc. In the 15+ knots cruise, Beneteau Swift Trawler works, Grand Banks.

Only you can tell what you could be comfortable with. I am guessing a cruise of 15 knots plus. You could try a few days at that speed on your current boat. But I'd still recommend chartering. After one week at a slower speed, you'll know if it's ok for you.

Now, you've had a glimpse at course 102, back to 101 for a moment. You need to define your requirements. What are you looking for in this boat. Sleep how many? Flybridge? What type galley? Indoor vs. Outdoor space. Draft. Air draft. Speed is just one factor. What are you wanting it to do for you. I'm assuming also you're keeping your land base. Two boats might be the solution. One like your present, one slower and larger. Maybe even tow a boat like you have now behind or something smaller.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2016, 11:03 AM   #18
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,080
Great advice from BandB.

Being a slow guy I really don't know, but if you want to run at 15knots, I would think that you would want to find a boat that can "comfortably" run at 15 knots. If you were in a boat with a top speed of 16-17 knots, I don't know that 15 knots would be all that pleasant for extended periods. But again, speeds above 8 knots are foreign to me.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2016, 03:25 PM   #19
Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Country: Canada
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 11
great advice all around in this thread... you might be right BandB the need for spped might always be there ....looking at the Carver C34 ...it's a new model 2013, but I figure in two years the price might come down a little and I might be able to afford it...

I want a fly bridge, large outdoor sitting area, stairs not a ladder for the fly, with bedrooms being downstairs while the rest is on top...diesel engines
Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2016, 04:33 PM   #20
Guru
 
Carolena's Avatar
 
City: DC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carolena II
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 32/34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 605
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
Great advice from BandB.

Being a slow guy I really don't know, but if you want to run at 15knots, I would think that you would want to find a boat that can "comfortably" run at 15 knots. If you were in a boat with a top speed of 16-17 knots, I don't know that 15 knots would be all that pleasant for extended periods. But again, speeds above 8 knots are foreign to me.
This is a great observation. By way of reference, our boat tops out at 15.5 knots wide open. It was the speed listed in the original sea trial report from when the boat was new, and we hit it on the sea trial when we bought the boat. But, we NEVER run at that speed. We usually cruise around 8-9 knots, and occasionally take her up a little higher to blow out the carbon. Just because our boat can do 15, does not mean it is a happy place. It get noisy, she puts up a huge wake, fuel use goes through the roof, and I worry about pushing her that hard. Just because a boat can hit a certain speed, does not mean the hull and engine will be happy cruising at that speed. We are the slowest boat out of our group of about six close friends' boats that we cruise with. The next slowest cruises around 18. We just leave a little earlier and arrive a little later. But we do so in complete comfort from our quiet heated and air-conditioned pilot house. You just need to decide what is important to you.

As an aside, we had a group trip planned for last weekend with everyone taking Friday off. The trip wound up being canceled because some of our friends wanted to save money on fuel for a longer trip we have planned for July. For us, at our speed, fuel wasn't even an issue - we would have likely spent more on our bar bill once we got to our location.
__________________

Carolena is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012