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Old 11-15-2018, 02:09 PM   #1
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Allweather Trailerable Trawler

I know 6 knots is slow as snot but I'm okay with only burning 1/4 gal an hour and a cruising range of 1500 miles. Being able to trailer the Allweather is a huge plus. Just not sure how deep the launch ramp needs to be to get it on and off the trailer. The interior size is spartan (no shower) and small but since my wife has passed away, I'm sailing solo these days. The thing that appeals to me the most about this little boat is it's ability to handle rough conditions. Yes, it will probably roll the cream out of your coffee, but look at how many are up in Alaska used as a fishing platform.

The pricing for these boats has been all over the map, if you can find one for sale. I've seen the Allweather listed on the Allweather web page but with the boat market being soft, I'm wondering about their list price.
Any and all opinions welcomed!!!
Thanks
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Old 11-15-2018, 02:21 PM   #2
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I too am considering a capable trailerable trawler and looked at the Allweather. Given their length, hull form and small power I'm thinking 6 kts would be under the most favorable conditions. 5 or 5.5 might be more realistic. A conversation with an Allweather owner confirmed that. And the small fresh water tank makes 2 big negatives. Now I'm looking elsewhere.



Yes, for the few that are sale prices are all over the map. I don't think I'd want to pay more than $30K - $35K for one in excellent shape.
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Old 11-15-2018, 02:36 PM   #3
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So I looked up Allweather boats and found their website at ALLWEATHERBOATS.COM


Small, cute, very good space utilization, extremely efficient. Solo cruising is probably its best use.



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Old 11-15-2018, 02:56 PM   #4
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Allweather Trailerable Trawler

They appear to have a downsized version of my hull. Id expect them to be very seaworthy for their size, albeit somewhat rolly in certain conditions.
Given the WLL and shape, maximum speed would be about 6.5 knots in calm water.
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Old 11-15-2018, 03:40 PM   #5
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I’m usually a fan of long and narrow but this one would appeal more to me if it were wider. I have a rolly boat but it’s not a snap roll. That what my old Albin did. The Allweather would IMO be great w stabilizers.
Bottom line for me is I’d much rather have another Albin.

5.5 knots is probably OK as we do 6.15 through the water all the time and 1/2 a knot loss would probably be acceptable. Going to Alaska would take 25days instead of 22 that it took us on the Willard.
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Old 11-16-2018, 01:50 AM   #6
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Reminds me of the Albin 25.
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Old 11-16-2018, 02:59 AM   #7
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I had an Albin 25 but would favor an Allweather. The only one I know of for sale is the Cape Caution,and its not really for sale. I talked to Troy a few months ago and he is thinking of keeping it for his own use.
I agree with David, solo cruising would be the best use.
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:52 AM   #8
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Great looking small boat. Just right for one or two people.
Adding a water maker, cockpit shower and a way to heat the water, would be a great improvement. With a range of 1500-2000 miles, a shower might make you more welcome at the fuel dock and in town.
Hmmmm, an AC sure would be nice for FL.
A cold plate, instead of a box full of ice, would make the cruise more habitable.
There was a mention of needed a holding tank, of course.
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Old 11-17-2018, 01:58 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olsurfer View Post
I know 6 knots is slow as snot but I'm okay with only burning 1/4 gal an hour and a cruising range of 1500 miles. Being able to trailer the Allweather is a huge plus. Just not sure how deep the launch ramp needs to be to get it on and off the trailer. The interior size is spartan (no shower) and small but since my wife has passed away, I'm sailing solo these days. The thing that appeals to me the most about this little boat is it's ability to handle rough conditions. Yes, it will probably roll the cream out of your coffee, but look at how many are up in Alaska used as a fishing platform.

The pricing for these boats has been all over the map, if you can find one for sale. I've seen the Allweather listed on the Allweather web page but with the boat market being soft, I'm wondering about their list price.
Any and all opinions welcomed!!!
Thanks
Although they are trailerable, it wouldn't be launched from a boat ramp. They are made to be picked up off of the trailer by travel lift or equivalent according to the late Homer Hughes (builder).
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Old 11-17-2018, 03:11 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Im usually a fan of long and narrow but this one would appeal more to me if it were wider. I have a rolly boat but its not a snap roll. That what my old Albin did. The Allweather would IMO be great w stabilizers.
Bottom line for me is Id much rather have another Albin.

5.5 knots is probably OK as we do 6.15 through the water all the time and 1/2 a knot loss would probably be acceptable. Going to Alaska would take 25days instead of 22 that it took us on the Willard.
I think you'd find Eric that the beam is as wide as legal trailering without permit would allow in most places. It does look a bit like a blend of Auscan's Cuddles 30 and those British land launched life boats for coastal rescues..?
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Old 11-17-2018, 04:37 AM   #11
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Hi Peter,
Yes they are max width.
Maybe it’s a top heavy thing I’m see’in or think I’m see'in but I think not. I’ve never been aboard one even at the dock. But double enders are inherently tippy because they are pointy at both ends. Imagine how stable a typical trawler would be if the bow looked just like the stern. All four corners would be acting like the hydraulic feet of a small crane. Incredibly stable.
Now consider lobster boats that are slim, skinny and/or fine in the bow. Many or most are. But the designers make them wide and flat aft. And of course they are stable. Look at the Willard 30 and the Cuddles 30. Both a bit slender fwd but both very full aft. They are double enders but have a “purchase” on the water much like a square sterned boat. Again stable but not quite like a square sterned boat. Mostly stable.
Now look at the Allweather. The stern looks just about like the bow. As goes the usual one sentence description of a double end boat .. the stern looks like the bow. Not so much the W30 or C30.
I’ve not seen the British lifeboats you mention but suspect they are full at both ends to carry max people at very slow speeds.
That is what I think that bothers me about the Allweather. She’s fine at BOTH ends and lacks the stability of the usual boat because of it. So I’d like more beam amidships to make up for the outboard support lost aft due to her fine end aft. Like a sailboat they need wide “cheeks” like a chipmunk to keep her stable.
More than you wanted to hear but that’s my take as Freed Zachoria says.
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Old 11-17-2018, 04:53 AM   #12
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Hi Peter,
Yes they are max width.
Maybe its a top heavy thing Im seein or think Im see'in but I think not. Ive never been aboard one even at the dock. But double enders are inherently tippy because they are pointy at both ends. Imagine how stable a typical trawler would be if the bow looked just like the stern. All four corners would be acting like the hydraulic feet of a small crane. Incredibly stable.
Now consider lobster boats that are slim, skinny and/or fine in the bow. Many or most are. But the designers make them wide and flat aft. And of course they are stable. Look at the Willard 30 and the Cuddles 30. Both a bit slender fwd but both very full aft. They are double enders but have a purchase on the water much like a square sterned boat. Again stable but not quite like a square sterned boat. Mostly stable.
Now look at the Allweather. The stern looks just about like the bow. As goes the usual one sentence description of a double end boat .. the stern looks like the bow. Not so much the W30 or C30.
Ive not seen the British lifeboats you mention but suspect they are full at both ends to carry max people at very slow speeds.
That is what I think that bothers me about the Allweather. Shes fine at BOTH ends and lacks the stability of the usual boat because of it. So Id like more beam amidships to make up for the outboard support lost aft due to her fine end aft. Like a sailboat they need wide cheeks like a chipmunk to keep her stable.
More than you wanted to hear but thats my take as Freed Zachoria says.
They may be a little tender but N.A Ted Brewer says the Allweather would be able to recover from 120 degree roll. Ya think Willy could?
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Old 11-17-2018, 05:59 AM   #13
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S of F,
HaHa I have no idea.
It’s hard to estimate numerically the roll at extremes underway.
Coming out of Ketchikan we encountered some very steep confused seas when we lived there. Willy was thrown sideways into a trough (hole) and when she slamed in the bottom (on her side) I heard what sounded like a timber breaking. Nothing ever found. But when things get that wild I’d be hard pressed to be able to tell you if the rock band that was in the wheelhouse had left or not.
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Old 11-17-2018, 06:45 AM   #14
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Eric, I think in any case, you are confusing form stability with fundamental stability. Form stability is dictated by shape, and wide a boat with a wide beam tends to have quite a snap back to the roll characteristic as a result. Unlike the more gentle roll of your Willy, but like my CHB 34, because of the wide and fairly flat aft section of the hull. Whereas true stability, ie the ability to right from an extreme roll, (I'm sure naval architects have a proper term for it), is more a function of the righting moment created by the vertical distance between the centre of buoyancy, and the centre of mass, which in the case of sail boats is way below the centre of buoyancy, and I suspect the Allweather is a bit like a sail boat in that respect. Ie plenty of ballast as low as possible, yet not so much as to make her too heavy to trailer.
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Old 11-17-2018, 10:26 AM   #15
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Although they are trailerable, it wouldn't be launched from a boat ramp. They are made to be picked up off of the trailer by travel lift or equivalent according to the late Homer Hughes (builder).
A pretty skanky looking trailer I must say....


however with a properly designed custom built trailer such as 'Nimiane' has there would be no requirement for a travel lift.
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Old 11-17-2018, 10:32 AM   #16
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A pretty skanky looking trailer I must say....


however with a properly designed custom built trailer such as 'Nimiane' has there would be no requirement for a travel lift.
They only made 31 of the Allweather boats according to the Allweather site.
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Old 11-17-2018, 10:46 AM   #17
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PeterB,
Yes of course I agree.
Willard 30’s have 4000lbs of balast deep in the wineglass keel.
There’s much about stability we haven’t mentioned like topside flare and re most or much of it at least for me I/we just don’t know. Maybe the all weather is as stable as the Albin. I was active in the local Albin club of about 50 25’ Albins and there was never any mention of a capsize anywhere in the world and the only thing ever mentioned about stability was the very objectionable snap roll. So if the Allweather is as stable as the Albin I’d be happy to have never mentioned my suspicions about the stability of the Allweather.
But the hollow stern is definitely lacking some stability thank you for the pic bogranjac1.
Re the travel lift question it appears one would need a steep ramp, a long trailer tounge or one would need to submerse the tow vehicle’s axle, brakes and such. On my typical 19’ OB I back down till water comes up to the steel wheel. So it would probably depend on the launch ramps availible near your home or otherwise where you want to go.
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Old 11-17-2018, 10:46 AM   #18
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One of the best boats for the old single guy who likes to spend weeks out there alone
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Old 11-17-2018, 02:39 PM   #19
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[QUOTE=bogranjac1;715479]A pretty skanky looking trailer I must say..../QUOTE]


It does seem like the pics of the trailers for the Allweather leave something to be desired. Probably okay for getting from the dock to the storage yard but I would not try to tow it on the highway for any distance.


[QUOTE One of the best boats for the old single guy who likes to spend weeks out there alone /QUOTE]


Sounds good to me!


I agree that double enders are more tender and rolly than a wider transom boat, but am I wrong in thinking that one of the double ender advantages would be to handle following seas, without the risk of broaching, better than a squared off transom? Our waters are no stranger to steep waves with short intervals. I was on a boat that broached and I hope to never do that again!


Thanks to everyone who has "chimed in" on this topic.
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Old 11-17-2018, 04:57 PM   #20
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This is an interesting photo, as I don't recall seeing a trailerable boat backed on a trailer before!








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