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Old 07-12-2009, 04:33 AM   #41
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advice re boat

As properly designed and constructed steel boat will be far different from a GRP or aluminum vessel.

The entire interior , will be designed to be removed EASILY.

Yes ,"Easily" does create extra work on the build but nothing difficult.

Every 15 years or so the entire interior can be yanked to expose ALL of the hull,
The hull gets sandblasted and painted 6 or 7 coatings.

Then the interior is replaced , usually after a complete redo.

Flat bar , not T or L in the hull reinforcement helps the blasting/painting process.

Since the interior is out of the vessel, refinishing , rebuilding or replacing is far less labor intensive , and in most parts of the world LABOR is most of what is paid for.

So if a vessel is kept in great condition Steel is no more costly than the rest.

A friend had this done in Poland about 10 years ago, brought his own paint , and new wiring , and the bill was $5,000US for a 2 month process.Did the outside too.

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-- Edited by FF on Sunday 12th of July 2009 04:34:22 AM
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Old 07-12-2009, 02:17 PM   #42
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RE: advice re boat

Lord Nelson? Too much rocker in the sheer and way too much in the house. The basic concept is great but executed too cutesy cutesy. They remind me of a little tugboat cartoon. Don't know anything about their mechanics or construction and if I did I may be inclined to overlook trite styling or whatever. But if you want a FD yacht there's not many boats to choose from. I wonder if my Willard is going up in value due to the fuel cost issue? I hav'nt read this whole thread so it may have been dealt with but if I was looking for another boat I'd be very concerned about bulsa core contrruction. I wonder if one could be better off w a wood boat maintenance wise than a bulsa core FG boat. I wonder if anyone has ever written a really objective compairison of FG and wood. It may be closer than we think. Having said that Marin perhaps you should buy the David B. Baker's right** .. the Krogen is one fine boat. I can be a very critical person (as most of you know) but the only thing I can find wrong w the Krogen is that in my opnion the boat is a bit too tall** ..* topsides and especially the wheelhouse. But then thats one of the reasons the GB is a bit wet, it may not be tall enough. Marin, what else have you considered? It's a shock to me that you would consider anything but a GB and I'm sure I'm not alone in my shocked state. Oh Marin, Look at the way those guys have the David B blocked up. That keel is going to remain straight** .. assuming it was when it was hanging in the slings. Looks like the Donna is moored next to a boat w a bad helmsman. I'm going for a run to Petersburg*** ..* be back in a week.

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Old 07-13-2009, 11:50 AM   #43
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advice re boat

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nomadwilly wrote:

Lord Nelson? Too much rocker in the sheer and way too much in the house. The basic concept is great but executed too cutesy cutesy.
Depend on what you think a tugboat should look like.* If you look at the tugs that worked New York harbor in the 1920s through 1970s or so, you see*what basically looks like a Lord Nelson Victory Tugs on steroids.* They all had that high bow, very curved sheer, and the pilothouse and main cabin followed the sheer.* I used to build models of them as*a kid.

What DOESTN'T look much like a real tug are the Nordic Tugs and (even less) the American Tugs.* I'm not disparaging their seaworthiness, quality, etc., only their aesthetics.* But one reason we were--- and still are--- so drawn to the Victory Tug is that it actually does look like a working tug from the "golden years" of tugs.



*


-- Edited by Marin on Monday 13th of July 2009 11:50:58 AM
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Old 07-13-2009, 12:13 PM   #44
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RE: advice re boat

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FF wrote:

As properly designed and constructed steel boat will be far different from a GRP or aluminum vessel.

The entire interior , will be designed to be removed EASILY.


What you say sounds correct, but from what I've seen your theory does not match reality.* The steel boats I've been on over the years--- ranging from the aforementioned converted fireboat to the completely restored former President of Mexico's yacht---*did not have "removable interiors."*

In the case of the yacht, built in (I believe) the 1930s or thereabouts, the man who bought it had it completely gutted in a shipyard in Oakland in (I think) the 1970s.* After everything had been removed from the interior of the hull and the*inside and outside taken down to clean metal, *the yardmaster called the owner down to "take a look at something."* They went into the darkened hull and the owner told me (many years later) that it was like looking up at the stars, there were so many pinholes.* But he had loved the yacht since first seeing it before WWII and finally was able to acquire it several decades later,*so he had a complete new steel hull fabricated around the old one.* The total restoration bill was several million dollars.* However, the owner was from an "old oil money" family and could well afford to do this.* I was on board this fantail*yacht several times (I think it was about 115 feet long) and it was absolutely gorgeous.* It was like going back to the heyday of the 1930s, and the owner could afford to keep it*in perfect condition.* But the interior was anything but "easily removeable."

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Old 07-14-2009, 04:41 AM   #45
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RE: advice re boat

The boats I have seen that were built to be maintained were all post WWII Euro built as cruisers, sail or motor sail .

Before then, Labor was so cheap , and boats so disposable ("If you have to ask') that the less than very rich were not cruising much.

Old scrapped work boats boats were the staple of Slocum, Tillman and other pioneers .

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