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Old 12-08-2014, 06:00 AM   #41
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Chlorine Dioxide aka Purogene is indeed effective in killing the bugs. Different chemical make-up than Sodium Hypochloride but basically provides the same disinfection results. The use of Clorox is simply more readily available and probably is already on board.
I have one problem that I have yet to get my head around though on many of the advertising promotions and in most of our discussions about water. That is at what point in the water cycle do we determine the use of "Fresh" when referring to water. I generally accept that to mean non-salt water but its use today and in ads seems to me to be used like its newer and therefore better. It is actually the same water that has been on this planet for millions of years. I don't think we have made any new water nor have we lost much over those millions of years maybe a few gallons lost on space flights but that is about it.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:02 AM   #42
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I the days of service, 4 oz bleach to 100 gals of water was the norm. 2-10 ppm Chlorine.
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Old 12-08-2014, 11:01 AM   #43
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Indeed, bleach is readily available and effective when water is treated often. Long term storage is where it falls short ... like when a boat is on the hard or in storage for extended length of time, especially during warm season.

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Originally Posted by ulysses View Post
That is at what point in the water cycle do we determine the use of "Fresh" when referring to water. I generally accept that to mean non-salt water but its use today and in ads seems to me to be used like its newer and therefore better.
Fresh water term often means non-salty, especially around boats. In context of this discussion fresh means not stale, not spoiled, and/or palatable and fit for drinking ... but I think you knew it already ...
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Old 12-08-2014, 04:51 PM   #44
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I installed new tanks in my boat in the 90's and a guess is 94-95. I washed the tanks the best I could, rinsed them many times then put them in place. Stainless and food grade. I have never used bleach in my water system but I do have four filters. One before the tanks, one before the pump, one after the pump and one more under the galley sink with it's own faucet. I have a niece who only drinks bottled water. She was aboard one day and I did a blind test with her bottled water and my boat water. She could not tell the difference. We drink our water, I lived aboard 20 years and always will.

Filtering is the way I went. Chlorine isn't good for the body. Studies done with people who drink water purified by the iodine tablets, like peace corps workers in Africa, showed a remarkable lack of cancer in their lives. Something to think about.
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Old 12-08-2014, 05:32 PM   #45
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Capthead: Excellent point, on the cancer causing but not necessarily as it pertains to boat tanks other than those left full for very long periods of time. Going a little deeper into the chlorine/water disinfection than should be necessary but... As chlorine attacks the pathogens in water chemical changes take place. The by products of that reaction are grouped into two groups Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic acids, both have been shown to cause cancer. They are usually found at the end of municipal water lines and locations where water has been disinfected and left to sit. Flushing removes them. If you live on the end of a cul-de-sac you should see your water department flush at least annually to clear those out of the system. On a boat I would recommend flushing your tanks at least twice a year if you disinfect with any type of disinfectant. The EPD started requiring testing for those by products about six years ago.
I spend a few months a year in Nicaragua building new water wells and distribution systems in remote villages and have found it surprising how many people in this world do not have access to anything close to clean drinking water. 3 out of 4 newborns die from water born diseases in that area the first year of life. Those that survive develop some immunity to the bacteria but are still exposed to all the other toxins, viruses, nitrites, etc..
Since I am living and working in the villages before the systems are completed I usually carry my own supply of water and a prescription of Cipro.
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Old 12-08-2014, 06:01 PM   #46
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ulysses, you have an interesting life. I remember back in my college days taking geology and we had a petroleum geologist who taught most classes. He said, oil is always a good field to be in but in your lifetime ground water will become most important and good clean drinking water.

That was 1966. Here in Orange County, CA they are putting clean sanitation water in the ground and a mile away pumping fresh drinking water for the cities. My brother works for a company the monitors the ground level so they don't pump more or take more and keep the ground level. This is by their satellites that can see 1mm of movement.

There are filters that will remove chlorine and even putting a glass of water in the sun for about an hour will remove it.
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Old 12-08-2014, 06:16 PM   #47
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So they have a mile of filtration? Your geology prof. was right especially where you live. I know the drought has many concerned and water has always been a critical issue out there. I just hope that we have not waited to late to realize its importance.
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Old 12-08-2014, 06:44 PM   #48
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That program is a decade old or so and some cities refuse to use that water. My slip neighbor retired from the City of Orange as dept head for the water dept. He refused it for Orange but he's been retired about five or six years now so who knows. He also wouldn't fluoride the water.

LA's water comes from way north and the Colorado River mostly. OC has to use other means. This drought has been bad on the entire state but we are finally seeing rain.

It was a god send for me replacing my deck, though.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:05 PM   #49
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Drink a few glass of a good red wine 1st, that should get rid of anything that's buggy, and if still bothers you try again, keep applying the wine until it doesn't matter anymore.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:31 PM   #50
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I'll drink to that!!
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Old 12-09-2014, 05:33 AM   #51
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That may work, but I prefer freezing the water in small cylinders with a hole through the center then then pouring Makers Mark on top for disinfection then drink.
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Old 12-09-2014, 10:29 AM   #52
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I found Scotch is an excellent disinfectant and blends real well with filtered water.
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Old 12-09-2014, 11:47 AM   #53
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Tank you Ulysses... Great explanations.
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Old 12-09-2014, 12:04 PM   #54
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A very interesting read regarding water: Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water, Revised Edition: Marc Reisner: 9780140178241: Amazon.com: Books

I don't recall the copyright date, and it's been a while since I read it. Even though the material may be dated, it's a fascinating read, particularly if you happen to reside in one of the areas covered by the book. For those in SoCal, as I recall, the book's author's premise is that human life at the western edge of the Mojave Desert is simply not viable in the long term, due to water (or lack of it) issues. As desalination and waste water reclamation are moving to the forefront these days, caused in part to the recent drought in SoCal, that premise seems to be right on the mark.

I realize this posting somewhat drifts from the original question regarding adding bleach to water tanks aboard recreational vessels. I apologize for the thread creep. As a boat owner, I am concerned with perhaps not the carcinogens present in boat water tanks, but certainly the potential for equally-threatening infectious "bugs" (viral and/or bacterial) that lurk down there in the dark. There are seemingly as many "fixes" as there are "fixers" willing to share on this forum (and others). This isn't all bad, but sorting through them is a bit of a challenge.

For what it's worth, my "fix" has been replacement of an aluminum water tank with one made from 316L stainless, and annual shock treatment of the tankage and water system with bleach, per Peggy Hall's recommendations. So far, so good. Knock on wood, of which I have more than enough, thank you.

Regards,

Pete
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