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Old 05-19-2011, 09:35 AM   #1
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42' Bristol Trawler

As I said before, I was going to be asking a lot of questions of you fine people while I am in the process of restoring my Bristol trawler. My question of the day is: Does anyone here know how the Bristol rides in a seaway and also at anchor? With its full displacement and round bilges, I have been reading lots of conflicting statements. I admire the vessel's shape and weighted keel, and my life's experience has been with sportfish planing hulls which can be no picnic in beam and following seas. Any feedback is always greatly appreciated.

Steve
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Old 05-20-2011, 05:05 AM   #2
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RE: 42' Bristol Trawler

I own a similar Bristol Trawler - have taken it from Canada to the Keys. She is a LOT more stable than a semi-displacement hull beyond 10-15 degrees of roll which is when the going is gtting rough. On her mooring, I occasionally find stuff on the cabin sole which is the result of lobster boats blowing by at WOT creating large wakes that catch her on the beam.

The Bristol is a very heavily built boat. I have the plugs removed from the various thru hull locations and they are impressively thick. Our boat handles well but there will be a learning curve. With a single engine and no thruster, you will quickly learn to use your spring lines to advantage.

Check out maineislandadventures.com for some pix of our boat and contact me offline for addn'l info

Kevin O
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Old 05-26-2011, 01:36 PM   #3
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RE: 42' Bristol Trawler

your boat is beautiful Kevin...mine will be like that in a couple of years. The transport company is getting ready to ship the boat from Jacksonville up here to Mass and they are removing the bridge. They ask, "is it through bolted to the cabin roof or screwed; from the top or sides?; My email is sjemery@gmail.com

Thanks v much.
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Old 07-19-2011, 01:09 PM   #4
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RE: 42' Bristol Trawler

Well the Bristol has arrived at my boatyard. My first question (many more coming) is what wood are the rubrails made of? They are 2 1/2" at the base where they attach to the hull with 1/4 - 20 s.s. machine screws and have half round s.s. caps. The caps are sound but the wood is all rotted so I am replacing them. *

P.S. love having a trawler.
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Old 07-20-2011, 04:35 AM   #5
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RE: 42' Bristol Trawler

Steve,
Rub rails on our Marine Trader were teak. I bought a 2" thick plank up in Berwick Maine (near Kittery) and cut 2 new ones from that.

Can't wait to hear more of your progress and adventures. Where is your yard?

Jim
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Old 07-20-2011, 10:59 AM   #6
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RE: 42' Bristol Trawler

Hi Jim...the yard where she will stay on the hard for the next 4 years is in Weymouth, MA. I suspected they were teak so I will start looking for a source for 2 1/2" by 2 1/2" rough cut. Hull bottom is being soda blasted next week, then I'm gutting the engine room....cummins, yan-mar, fuel tanks, etc. all coming out. Lots od work ahead but I love it.
Steve
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:07 PM   #7
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RE: 42' Bristol Trawler

Take lots of photos so you have the before and after. Some of us here don't read too well, but we like pictures, so feel free to post lots of 'em!
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Old 07-21-2011, 09:41 AM   #8
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RE: 42' Bristol Trawler

Haha....well I sure will post some pics!
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Old 12-06-2013, 03:59 PM   #9
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I have an older Bristol. The cap and rub rails are of mahogany. I have replaced most with a Brazilian hardwood called Ipe. Its is more durable and rot resistant than mahogany and teak. However, I painted it white since I am adverse to spending hours with varnish.
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Old 12-06-2013, 08:49 PM   #10
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Welcome to the forum tfranklin.
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Old 08-12-2014, 12:25 PM   #11
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Can anyone give me info on a Detroit 6-71 diesel in a 1969 Bristol 42. Pros-cons, Good Bad and the Ugly. Why did Bristol change to duel power plants in the following years? Any and all info would be appreciated....
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Old 08-13-2014, 05:07 PM   #12
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Pros: Easy to work on.
Parts are easy to source (Napa or truck shops)
Low tech, easy to get or keep running.

Cons: Uses a relatively larger amount of fuel (2 stroke)
Noisy.
Dirty/ leaky (oil)
Heavy
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Old 08-13-2014, 08:36 PM   #13
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Windless,

To address your second question; somewhere in the early'80s, despite the price of oil, some folks thought that if you flattened the bottom of the hull somewhat and added a second engine that you could get a Trawler to (semi) plane above hull speed. There are a Lot of diesel gussling trawlers out there from that era still.

Not wanting to start another "food fight" over singles and twins, I would say you have a good start with just the single Detroit in your Bristol - go make the best of it.
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Old 08-13-2014, 09:06 PM   #14
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Okay, Thank you all for your replies, next question.
1. A Bristol 42 with a Detroit 6-71N, what is the fuel consumption at cruising (gph) and what is average cruising speed (knots and RPM)?
2. Is the Bristol 42 with a 6-71 underpowered?
3. Were there any technical problems with the 1969 Bristol 42 (manufacture defects etc.) that would make this boat a bad purchase today?
4. Compare the Bristol 42 with a Grand Banks 42 (same year range 1969).
5. Anything else I should know about the Bristol 42 before I plunge into the deep blue money pit of no return, and have to listen to my wife constantly say, "I know how much you love that boat, but I TOLD YOU SO."
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Old 08-17-2014, 10:25 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delta_JimS View Post
Windless,

To address your second question; somewhere in the early'80s, despite the price of oil, some folks thought that if you flattened the bottom of the hull somewhat and added a second engine that you could get a Trawler to (semi) plane above hull speed. There are a Lot of diesel gussling trawlers out there from that era still.

Not wanting to start another "food fight" over singles and twins, I would say you have a good start with just the single Detroit in your Bristol - go make the best of it.
Could you please take a stab at the other questions I asked. TY.....
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Old 08-18-2014, 02:08 AM   #16
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Reads a lot to me like I'm being assigned a homework assignment. No thanks!

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Old 08-18-2014, 03:09 AM   #17
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Windless, only a pretender would answer all your questions. The engine ones might be better asked on boatdiesel.com, but you could PM "manyboats" (Eric) and ask him about power adequacy and fuel consumption. I doubt tech problems in 1969 have much significance 45 years later, after various owners and modifications. The comparison is likely to be highly subjective in any event.You must have looked at a Bristol and a GB to get this far, if not, you should. And while I utterly distrust the concept of a "buyers broker" who gets paid by the seller (!), maybe consult one.What do you see as the + & - of each? Write them down, in + & - columns, for each boat. Faults not obvious after 45 years must be insignificant. And, good luck, it is nerve racking, but we`ve all been there.
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Old 08-18-2014, 09:12 AM   #18
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Answer to question 4.

1969 Bristol is fiberglass. 1969 Grand Banks is wood.
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:31 PM   #19
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1969 Bristol 42, 36K lb. Displacement. One of the earlier Bristol 42s built on Papasquash Road in Bristol, RI. Detroit 6-71, 2 cycle diesel with 185HP. Engine designed for landing craft in WWII and later used in GM Buses and trucks. Estimated fuel consumption is around 3-4 GPH at around 1800rpm. Hull speed app. 9 knts around 2000 rpm. Parts ready available and engine is simple to work on considering size. In good shape (compression etc) 185 HP, there should be plenty of power to displacement. Particular problems common to 6-71. Nothing out of the normal for an old 2 cycle diesel. (Info from forum on Boatdiesel.com). Anything else to add or dispute would be appreciated.
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