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Old 10-17-2012, 12:42 AM   #21
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The decking looks like the plastic derived synthetic type like Marinedeck or Flexiteek, so as that is glued down in large sheets, (if I'm right), it should be well sealed and ok.
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:16 AM   #22
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The decking looks like the plastic derived synthetic type like Marinedeck or Flexiteek, so as that is glued down in large sheets, (if I'm right), it should be well sealed and ok.
That's what I thought, too, but the broker sheet says teak.
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Old 10-17-2012, 09:32 AM   #23
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Refugio

Yes, a chartplotter and radar would be nice if not necessary for those who choose to leave the dock. While at it, AIS too.
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Old 10-17-2012, 10:40 AM   #24
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Recent experience

Here's a recent experience from Southern Cal.

In the past six months I have tapped and probed my way through 12 trawlers in this asking price range from Ventura to San Diego, and had one complete survey/haul.

Some boats were a mess, and the ask of $39K was immediately amended by the broker to "this boat will sell in the 20's." Many were really nice with great upgrades, from SS rails to modern navs to exceptionally clean and neat engine rooms to new $5K bimini enclosures. Several were early 70s GBs, with dry bilges--I quickly became a fan of mahogany hulls, which stand the test of time and remain works of boatbuilder art. Five of these boats had twin Lehmans (the rest were singles). None had more than about 2,000 hours.

Almost every one of these trawlers was Awlgripped (or similar) from waterline to flybridge and the hulls and superstructure look almost new. In most cases the brightwork was what you'd expect of a $39K offering, but not scary to somebody (like me) who has time to sand and varnish and is crazy enough to almost enjoy it.

And yet: in every case, there was one brutal issue that changed everything, usually either/or/all:
--Original questionable black iron fuel tanks.
--Spongy Teak decks
--Cabin house roof trampoline effect.

In dealing with five or six brokers--not the way I used to do it but with the Internet listings today just about unavoidable--I was told that boats are selling for half price. From what I've seen in our recession-hit marinas there's truth to that. My guess is that you can get a whale of a bargain at about $75K and up.

But from what I;ve seen in the price range of the pretty 40-footer that started this thread, it is very unlikely to stand the scrutiny of even an optimistic restoration-minded bidder. So my search continues.

You know what the most interesting thing is about Internet shopping these days?

It's the wonderful sales photographs, soemtimes 40 of them, by which a good eye can tell so much, and then drive 200 miles to see the real thing.

The photographs are unexpectedly misleading. I would never have guessed how shabby a boat can look when in the pictures it beckoned like a mermaid and within ten feet revealed itself a walrus.

For what it's worth--still looking.
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:33 PM   #25
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Another brutal issue: the unavailibility of replacement engine parts. Do some research before you buy a boat whose engines are no longer supported by the manufacturer.
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Old 10-17-2012, 02:31 PM   #26
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The photographs are unexpectedly misleading. I would never have guessed how shabby a boat can look when in the pictures it beckoned like a mermaid and within ten feet revealed itself a walrus.
Yes, that is the "magic" of stills/film/video. To those of us in that business we depend on it to be able to fool an audience into thinking they're seeing one thing when in fact they aren't. Special effects that look so realistic and convincing on a screen are in fact often quite crude if you could examine them closely frame by frame.

While photos of a boat for sale are valuable for showing you the boat itself, its configuration, equipment, etc. one should never judge the actual condition of anything on a boat by the photos. Even something as basic as a stove top can look great in a photo of the galley but when you see it in person you see the corrosion, rust, etc. that the camera didn't register.

Our own almost 40-year-old boat looks pretty good in photos. But up close you see the ravages of the California sun on the gelcoat during the boat's first 25 years, the chips and dings, the trim pieces that need refinishing, old glass (unless it's a pane we've replaced), and on and on and on.

It is virtually inevitable that something that looks great in photos, be it a vehicle, boat, house, you name it, will not look that good in person or will have defects that are obvious to the eye but not to the lens. The only exceptions I can think of are brand new boats, cars, etc. or totally restored, immaculate boats like Hackers and Gar Woods, or cars that are restored to museum quality. They tend to look like their photos, if not even better in person.

So my rule is to use photos of something only to show me what that something is and if it will suit my needs in terms of configuration, equipment, instrumentation, etc. But I totally dismiss the photos as any sort of indication of the actual condition.
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Old 10-17-2012, 02:42 PM   #27
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Yes, that is the "magic" of stills/film/video. To those of us in that business we depend on it to be able to fool an audience into thinking they're seeing one thing when in fact they aren't. Special effects that look so realistic and convincing on a screen are in fact often quite crude if you could examine them closely frame by frame.

Hey now. Isn't chatter about the debates supposed to be in the Off Topic or OTDE?
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Old 10-17-2012, 03:09 PM   #28
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And yet: in every case, there was one brutal issue that changed everything, usually either/or/all:
--Original questionable black iron fuel tanks.
--Spongy Teak decks
--Cabin house roof trampoline effect.
I said that I owned one I did not comment on the black iron fuel tanks, spongy teak decks, and cabin roof trampoline All of which it had
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