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Old 11-02-2019, 01:26 PM   #21
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I just checked Wikipedia. There is no definition for "coastal cruiser."
Now, will someone please tell me how far out into the ocean a coastal cruiser can go.
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Old 11-02-2019, 02:29 PM   #22
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I am a fan of sleeping well at night, so my personal definition of coastal cruiser is a single day run from good anchorage to good anchorage, sometimes with a very long day cruising between them. Once you start cruising through the night or for multiple nights, you need a crew to rotate through the helm. Even if the weather is a bit uncomfortable, a good nights sleep to reconsider cruising to your next destination is well received.

Since I single hand, cruising for a single day before seeking a good anchorage is my normal. Even if I had a companion I would still choose to sleep in safe and calm waters every night, though I have made through the night passages (Inside Passage to Prince William Sound) for up to three days (with company).

Your vessel will certainly make long passages, it comes down to stamina for long runs, good weather patterns, and your determination to reach whatever destination you have your eyes set on :-)
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Old 11-02-2019, 03:14 PM   #23
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The ocean is generally smoother the further south you go. Going north it gets bad quickly.
100 years ago, two brothers rowed across the North Atlantic. Returning on a ship, the engine failed so they put the dory in the water and rowed home.
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Old 11-02-2019, 04:41 PM   #24
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The ocean is generally smoother the further south you go. Going north it gets bad quickly.
It depends how far south you go. It gets a little rough when you get down to the roaring forties.
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Old 11-02-2019, 05:05 PM   #25
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Even an ocean cruising boat can only go half way into the ocean....
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Old 11-02-2019, 05:31 PM   #26
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My husband and I just purchased 1972 36' GB and was wondering. Out of San Francisco bay how far would you travel? To Oregon, Mexico or closer like Monterey, San Diego? Posts I've read about people traveling pretty far seems like they are in at least a 42'.
Wifey B: How far would you go? I'd go far, but doesn't mean you would or should. Far more depends on the crew of the boat than the boat. How far do you want to go? What training and experience do you have? Don't go all the way on the first date but work up to it. The boat is capable of all the areas you mentioned with range being the only limiting factor but some of those areas do call for experienced and capable captains and crews.
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Old 11-08-2019, 04:18 PM   #27
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My husband and I just purchased 1972 36' GB and was wondering. Out of San Francisco bay how far would you travel? To Oregon, Mexico or closer like Monterey, San Diego? Posts I've read about people traveling pretty far seems like they are in at least a 42'.
Around the world. I'm a crazy person tho.



Just teasing.



As far as I could go safely on full tanks. I'd set out for the Inside Passage in spring. Again, I am actually a crazy person.
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Old 11-08-2019, 04:37 PM   #28
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I just checked Wikipedia. There is no definition for "coastal cruiser."
Now, will someone please tell me how far out into the ocean a coastal cruiser can go.
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the Mariana Trench is the deepest known point in Earth's oceans. In 2010 the United States Center for Coastal & Ocean Mapping measured the depth of the Challenger Deep at 10,994 meters (36,070 feet) below sea level with an estimated vertical accuracy of 40 meters.
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Old 11-08-2019, 05:45 PM   #29
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It depends how far south you go. It gets a little rough when you get down to the roaring forties.
Indeed. Bass Strait, and the Tasman Sea, have something to say about it being calmer further south.
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:03 PM   #30
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Indeed. Bass Strait, and the Tasman Sea, have something to say about it being calmer further south.
Here's the Southern Ocean on a beautiful day.

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Old 11-08-2019, 07:16 PM   #31
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A friend took his GB 38 (yes they about 5 38s)from NZ to Australia non stop, took I think 5-6 days, the Tasman sea can be very tough going, but he had a forecaster giving him constant updates, me, I would be too chicken to try it.
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:39 PM   #32
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My husband and I just purchased 1972 36' GB and was wondering. Out of San Francisco bay how far would you travel? To Oregon, Mexico or closer like Monterey, San Diego? Posts I've read about people traveling pretty far seems like they are in at least a 42'.

Dear friends based Newport Beach CA pre-retirement had a 36' GB, though theirs might have been a bit older than yours, & they cruised Alaska, Baja, both coasts of mainland Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia & the entire East Coast of the U.S. before returning to Florida where they finally sold their boat when the husband was in his late 70's. During a number of those years they also maintained a smaller boat in Hawaii for visits there. Depending on the limits of your own Wanderlust & developing skills, the entire New World is pretty much available to you.
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:07 PM   #33
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Congrats on your new boat. As you can tell, there a lot of people who love their GBs and deservedly so.

I also like to travel at night for longer runs. I don’t sleep much during my off watch, but it’s worth it and I really enjoy the peacefulness and serenity of the night.

I am currently planning a trip to the central coast from San Diego in early Spring. It’s the windiest time of year. Weather permitting, I would like to run 24 to 30 hours straight on the first leg. On the way back, with hopefully following seas and winds, I am planning on shorter day trips and stopping at anchorages or marinas.

Some of my trips are solo (daytime solo, because I want another person aboard for night runs), so I pay careful attention to the forecasts, but we all know how these can go.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:57 AM   #34
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36 as far as you are prepared to go

We have trawlers x2. 36,40. The 40 , My wife and I cruised from San Diego to Puerto Vallarta. Currently the 36 is in transit from San Diego to WA. Layover in Bay Area. We use the 36 in the summer months. We will pickup the forty in late Dec. and cruise Southern MX. through May. Its all about the WEATHER WIDOW, and planning. We have been in dangerous conditions with both boats and they always take care of us. In my opinion you have a great boat. Take care of Her . She will take-care of you.
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Old 11-09-2019, 04:24 PM   #35
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My husband and I just purchased 1972 36' GB and was wondering. Out of San Francisco bay how far would you travel? To Oregon, Mexico or closer like Monterey, San Diego? Posts I've read about people traveling pretty far seems like they are in at least a 42'.
Mine is a 42 but Im not sure the extra six feet matters. Next summer its going from Long Beach CA up the coast to Anacortes WA or nearby. The next summer to Alaska and back to the Puget Sound. I plan to allow lots of time headed north to Washington to find good weather windows.
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Old 11-09-2019, 06:02 PM   #36
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We cruised in the Hawaiian Islands in a 1972 GB36. Single Screw, 570 gallons of fuel, 120 fresh water. Inter island could get rough, she rolled in a beam sea, but we never felt she was un-seaworthy, just uncomfortable at times. No stabilizers. Personally I would feel comfortable, watching the WX with going from Alaska to Mexico in a well found GB36.
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Old 11-10-2019, 07:15 AM   #37
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"Now, will someone please tell me how far out into the ocean a coastal cruiser can go."

When boarding waves knock loose the storm ports over the glass area , or knock loose the deck house , you may have gone too far out.

By choosing a doldrums route ,at the right time of year,, if you have the endurance an Atlantic crossing can be made.

Coming from Euroland , waiting for the Christmas winds will help speed and ride , but takes hand steering or a really great auto pilot to handle big waves from astern..
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Old 11-10-2019, 10:26 AM   #38
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When boarding waves knock loose the storm ports over the glass area , or knock loose the deck house , you may have gone too far out.



Coming from Euroland , waiting for the Christmas winds will help speed and ride , but takes hand steering or a really great auto pilot to handle big waves from astern..

The first statement is a touch of an embellishment isn't it Fred? How many stories of ANY modern glass boats have you heard that the " House was knocked loose" ?


And most modern autopilots built after the 1980's will handle big waves at sea from the stern just fine.


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Old 11-10-2019, 11:15 AM   #39
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And most modern autopilots built after the 1980's will handle big waves at sea from the stern just fine.
Since I believe the subject here is "big following seas, ie. storm or survival conditions", then actually I don't think any of them will, not because there's anything wrong with today's electronic APs, but because the majority of boats out there don't have the stern shape or buttock lines to handle big seas from astern or quartering.

The ones that can would likely be your KKs, Nordies or a classic with a canoe or round stern, all of which account for maybe less than 1% of the boat population out there.

I was at the helm of my buddy's Mainship, trolling at 4 knots, and the little 4ft following seas were pushing our ass all over the place. I had to accelerate to 6+ knots just to get some rudder control (which of course pissed off the fishermen ). I clearly remember when I had my big Bluewater cruiser, having to take it off AP and then just hand steer in those freakin' crazy seas off Oregon.
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Old 11-10-2019, 11:23 AM   #40
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As Makobuilders points out, a lot of hull shapes (especially when combined with small rudders) don't do well with following seas when the seas are running faster than the boat.

My boat, for example, can be a handful at low speed in even 3 foot following seas. Pick up a little speed for more water over the rudders and it gets better. Pick up enough speed to keep pace with the waves and things become pretty easy. Depending on the angle you're taking them at, wave spacing, etc. running faster than the waves and surfing down them can be pretty easy at the helm as well.

Basically, for boats with a hull design and rudder size that doesn't lend itself to good following sea performance, IMO the best defense is having enough power to make good speed.
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