Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-30-2018, 08:50 AM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: ocracoke island, north carolina
Country: us
Vessel Name: Lazy Grady
Vessel Model: 1992 Grady White Explorer 250 hp outboard
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 38
1981 GB Classic

11/30/18 In process of purchasing. Never had a Trawler or Diesel engine. Before. How best can I get familiar as to reading for familiarization as a back ground for hands on piloting and maintenance training?
__________________
Advertisement

hwclark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2018, 09:54 AM   #2
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,378
I can only tell you my approach when I went through the same thing a year and a half ago. Sailing boats my whole life. Twin diesel trawler? Had never been on one. First, I read everything I could get my hands on for about 1 year prior to purchase. I think I read most of this site as well as grandbanksowners.com (not really true but you get my point) as well as a good bit of boatdiesel.com. Most of what I read I didn't understand but as I went along I became more knowledgeable on the conventional wisdom of many subjects.

When I finally purchased a boat I hired a well known local Captain and trainer to help me bring it north. A 1 1/2 day trip. Then I paid him to come back and spend a day going through the systems basics as well as 1/2 day on the water with handling. He gave me some pointers on how to practice on my own which I did for a few days after I got up the nerve to take it out on my own with wifey on board. Then I took one of his boat maintenance classes, two days and finally the Nigel Calder / Steve Zimmerman Diesel Engine course at Trawlerfest. That's the grand total of "formal" training.

In-between all of these I just went out on nice days, practiced slowing, accelerating, spinning on a dime, backing up, backing up and turning, played maneuvers around a buoy, etc. just to get more and more familiar with how the boat acts. Did so on smooth open waters with no one around. Found an empty dock are at my marina and practiced putting it in a wide open slip and against the dock with no other boats around. In short time I got to "adequate" on the handling scale. Wasn't that hard after a little practice and time. One final exam was putting it in between two boats to get fuel. It went fine and if nothing else my wife was impressed.

That's my story. Good luck with yours. My advice is to spend a few $$$ on someone who can show you the basics for a day or 2 and get you going. Go from there.
__________________

__________________
Hal
BLACK EYED SUSAN
Grand Banks 42 Classic
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2018, 11:40 AM   #3
Guru
 
Giggitoni's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo, California
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Mahalo Moi
Vessel Model: 1986 Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,766
This^. I did exactly what firstbase did, but about 11 years ago and on the other coast. Good advice!
__________________
Ray
"Mahalo Moi"
1986 GB-42 Classic
ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑβΕ
Giggitoni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2018, 11:43 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Rain Dog's Avatar
 
City: Pensacola, FL
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Rain Dog
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 184
I would recommend joining grandbankowners.com and reading through the manuals and forum archives there. Most GB specific questions are answered there.
Rain Dog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2018, 12:38 PM   #5
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rain Dog View Post
I would recommend joining grandbankowners.com and reading through the manuals and forum archives there. Most GB specific questions are answered there.
What he said. Slower, less populated site but you will get answers and some of the members are about as guru on Grand Banks as they come.
__________________
Hal
BLACK EYED SUSAN
Grand Banks 42 Classic
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2018, 12:55 PM   #6
Guru
 
Giggitoni's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo, California
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Mahalo Moi
Vessel Model: 1986 Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,766
The link... Grand Banks Owner's Resources
__________________
Ray
"Mahalo Moi"
1986 GB-42 Classic
ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑβΕ
Giggitoni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2018, 03:05 PM   #7
Member
 
Landfall's Avatar
 
City: Taylor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Landfall
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 13
I enjoy countless hours on a new boat following wires, hoses, pipes and peeking in openings. Find out what hooks to what and why. label what is not, find problems before they find themselves, remove leftover superfluous stuff left over from past repairs or refits. You cannot be too familiar with how the boat works when something breaks.
Landfall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 02:31 PM   #8
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Landfall View Post
I enjoy countless hours on a new boat following wires, hoses, pipes and peeking in openings. Find out what hooks to what and why. label what is not, find problems before they find themselves, remove leftover superfluous stuff left over from past repairs or refits. You cannot be too familiar with how the boat works when something breaks.
Wish I had read Landfalls comments before we picked up our boat. I have searched many wires...failed to label or write down anything. It goes away quick. Now I get to do it all over again. Someone else said to "Go slow to go fast". Wish I had done that for the same reason. I learned a little about everything fast but not really in depth so...I get to go do it all over again..again.

One other thing I learned was it is great to go into every nook and cranny of the boat. On our GB42 there are more of those than you think possible. We were finding them months after we got it. Clean them out but be careful of what you throw away. My experience is that something is on a boat because it is needed, or may be needed, for something no matter what it looks like. Good example is a 6" or so piece of odd shaped PVC pipe. Looked like trash. Found out it is a tool to remove or tighten the galley sink faucet from below. Not having it makes the job very difficult. An odd sized pencil zinc that doesn't seem to fit the engines may be a replacement for the one you didn't notice on the oil cooler. Stuff like that. We had a bunch of those.
__________________
Hal
BLACK EYED SUSAN
Grand Banks 42 Classic
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 06:51 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Civilitas's Avatar
 
City: PNW/Seattle-ish
Country: Air
Vessel Name: M/V Peter Iredale ;)
Vessel Model: rusting hulk
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by firstbase View Post
Wish I had read Landfalls comments before we picked up our boat. I have searched many wires...failed to label or write down anything. It goes away quick. Now I get to do it all over again. Someone else said to "Go slow to go fast". Wish I had done that for the same reason. I learned a little about everything fast but not really in depth so...I get to go do it all over again..again.

One other thing I learned was it is great to go into every nook and cranny of the boat. On our GB42 there are more of those than you think possible. We were finding them months after we got it. Clean them out but be careful of what you throw away. My experience is that something is on a boat because it is needed, or may be needed, for something no matter what it looks like. Good example is a 6" or so piece of odd shaped PVC pipe. Looked like trash. Found out it is a tool to remove or tighten the galley sink faucet from below. Not having it makes the job very difficult. An odd sized pencil zinc that doesn't seem to fit the engines may be a replacement for the one you didn't notice on the oil cooler. Stuff like that. We had a bunch of those.
Those two posts should be a “sticky” somewhere. They are simple, short, succinct and get the meassage across effectively. Almost a lesson in narrative writing as much as boat maintenance and survey.
__________________

Civilitas is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×