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Old 01-07-2017, 12:17 PM   #21
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Ken,

I want to give my $0.02 on passages like Tenass. My opinion is based on experience, I recently retired from running an oceanogrpahic research boat. In that capacity I was called on to make these kinds of passes often with minimal information. I donít want this to come across as preachy or lecture-y. I know a lot of the members have decades of experience. Some however do not. I donít know where you are on the spectrum.

Here goesÖ..

Deciding to run Tenass Pass is like everything else on a boat, a risk / benefit calculation. Risk here being the key. As others have mentioned you will be in a remote area with little help available if something goes wrong. You are running a twin screw boat with little or no protection for the running gear. A tiny bump on the rocks and a lot goes wrong in an instant.

Many here have already mentioned it, the most important thing is survey the pass from your small boat. Preferably with a good sounder. I prefer to make my survey at low water. If youíve got a good GPS even better. If that GPS can be mounted on the bridge of your big boat so you are dealing with very similar system errors as you make your passage and following the GPS track line better still.

Make your passage 1 Ė 3 hrs before high water. The exact timing will depend upon anticipated currents in the pass. You want as much rising tide left under you with as little current as possible.

The survey is made at low water so you can see more of the dangers. The passage is made near high water for obvious reasons, before high water so that you might float free if you get stuck. A note on that. Ak is a mixed semi diurnal tidal cycle. Two highs and two lows per tidal day. Often there is a considerable difference in height between the lower high tide and the higher high tide. If you are transiting the pass on one of those days, especially during spring tides consider that you can be aground for a day or more if you get stuck near the higher high water. And with Akís extreme tidal ranges you could be high and dry perched on a rock doing considerable damage to your hull and running gear.

If at all possible time your passages so that you are stemming the current. This allows you to move more slowly over the ground and to be able to stop and back away more quickly.

As you gain experience and local knowledge with Tenass Pass your transit window times widen. But on your first few passages be very careful, even if it means transiting the pass at inconvenient times.

Now I want to talk about charts, electronics and judgment. Again, not trying to be preachy.

Sounders.
I would not make a pass like Tenass without a good sounder. However, in places like S.E. Ak the bottom is so vertical that some times the sounder will tell you that you are aground as you strike the rocks. Go slow. Be careful. Know what the transducer offset, what the indicated depth is. Under the keel, under the transducer, at the water line? It is usually best to not run the sounder on auto range and auto gain in these situations. You donít need it getting confused and trying to find the bottom just when you need it most. Choose an appropriate range and adjust the gain before starting in. I prefer to have a sounder that charts the bottom as well as gives a digital depth reading. Sometimes the numbers get jumpy and there is no good way to make sense of the information. A chart of the bottom shows the trends even when the signal gets a little noisy.

GPS.
All non-survey grade GPS receivers are subject to error. There are no exceptions. Do you know how accurate yours is? How repeatable yours is? If the ďwobbleĒ in your system is 3 meters (not at all unusual despite manufacturer's claims) that means the confidence in your track line is 6 meters, 20 ft. GPS error increases in narrow steep sided channels. I know, the experts say it isnít so but Iíve seen it many times. And what GPS are you using? A purpose built marine unit or a tablet / phone GPS? The tablet / phone units are damned good but I wonít use one for narrow tricky passes. The short version is that well designed marine units prioritize accuracy over speed of fix. Most tablets / phones prioritize speed of fix over accuracy. And worse yet, the phone / tablet wonít tell you when itís doing that!

All of this is to say use the GPS, but donít trust it blindly. I don't have good charts of Tenass Pass here but it looks like there are some skinny spots that at low tide are 11 meters, 36 ft. If I'm right about 20 ft confidence and 36 ft wide safe channel that's just 8 ft of sure safety on either side of the centerline of your boat. If your boat is about 13 ft beam take 6.5 ft away and you're down to almost nothing. Oh yeah, and know where your GPS receiver is. If it's off to one side of centerline......

Charts.
In these kinds of places I will only use official charts, in Ak that would be NOAA charts. Cartographers have to make decisions when creating charts. They have to reduce a massive amount of data to a usable chart which means they throw out some data. Then as other chart makers use the NOAA charts to create their versions even more decisions are made resulting in more data loss. Generally non NOAA charts are very good. But Iíve seen more than a few instances where important features were missing.

And, things have been missed. A few years ago I found an uncharted pinnacle in a narrow pass Iíd transited dozens of times. That time I was a bit to the right of my usual track line. I canít recommend that as a way to get your heart rate up.

Paper vs electronic charts. Itís your choice and often a financial decision. I like having both aboard but then my employer required it and paid for them. These days Iím a little stingier with the number of paper charts I carry. However, if I wanted to transit the little passes around Prince of Whales Island to my favorite fishing holes frequently Iíd buy the relevant paper charts.

RNC (raster) vs ENC. In US waters NOAA provides them free of charge. Carry both. They offer different strengths and weaknesses. I have found in some less traveled areas they donít 100% agree. In those cases I put more trust in the RNCs for the same reasons I trust NOAA charts over other charts.

Beware of the dangers of overzooming electronic charts, no matter who made them or created the software. It leads to a false sense of accuracy that simply is not there.

A comment on the accuracy of charts. Know the dates of the survey the charts are based upon. I am not saying the surveyors and cartographers of old were sloppy and inaccurate. I am saying they and the mariners the charts were created for used different tools. Bearing and range were the tools of the trade ďback in the dayĒ. Early in the days of GPS and electronic charting it was not uncommon to find significant errors. Almost without exception the errors I noted were a displacement of the charted areas on the earthís surface. That is to say the bearing and distance between two points were nuts on, but might not be accurately placed on the earthís surface. An old pilot would round Pointy Rock Shoal day beacon at a known distance and bearing, set the course for Bent Tree Point for a safe clearance, make adjustments for set and drift and all was hunky dory. A GPS user like we all are these days would round the day mark by eye, point and click a waypoint off Bent Tree Point, activate the route, mash the autopilot button and if the charted area were displaced on the earth might wind up parked on the beach.

Hydrorgraphic services have been very diligent in correcting these errors but some of the less traveled areas are still not quite right. Be careful. I found one not too long ago. Slipping between an island and a peninsula, a narrow but deep channel and almost straight. Piece of cake, plot my course, look out the windows and keep Ďer in the middle. I glanced over at the electronic chart and saw by that we were on the logging road on the peninsula! A friend found a rock awash the hard way a few years back putting too much trust in a GPS chart plotter running non NOAA charts.

Putting it all together.
Hereís how I would approach my first transit of Tenass Pass. Assuming from your first post that you have considerable experience with El Capitan.

- Head over to southern El Capitan the day before. Anchor as near to Tenass Pass as you can and be confident in leaving the big boat for some time.

- Survey Tenass Pass at low water. Take your time. Find all the scary spots. Use your eyes as much as your GPS and sounder. Do you know how to spot natural ranges and how to use them? If not thatís another subject.

- Your survey line will be all zigg zaggy, not a usable track line. Using what you learned run the pass in your small boat as if you were running it in the big boat. Same speed you intend to run the pass in the big boat. Repeat until you are confident you have a trustable track line and good familiarity with the lay of the land. Both bottom and land marks on the shore line. I like to carry a waterproof note book and make sketches and notes.

- Back aboard the big boat chart your track line. If possible on both electronic and paper. Note where turns need to be made, courses to steer, safe distances off hazards, anticipated water depth at key points adjusted for tide height and transducer offsets. Work it all out in your head before you go. When you are in the pass is not the time to be figuring things out.

- When time and tide are right, probably the next day, make the run.

- LOTFW. Older captains, I guess Iím one now, like to remind the youngsters who professionally grew up on electronic navigation Look Out The F...ing Windows! Not just stare out the windows but know your courses, bearings, ranges and land marks. Use Ďem all.

- Stay ahead of your boat. A key to successful navigation and piloting is thinking ahead. Where you are now was solved a while ago, where you are going next is what you are thinking about. Electronic navigation encourages thinking only about where you are now. I can be as guilty of that bad practice as anyone!

Local Knowledge. There are two kinds, yours and theirs. Yours comes from experience with Tenass Pass. The more you run it the more you know it. Just donít get complacent and sloppy. Theirs is not to be trusted until you know for sure. Listen to the locals, particularly with respect to cautions and warnings. But do you own homework before you head into the pass.

The tools I like to use
- NOAA charts. All 3. Paper, RNC and ENC
- A quality marine grade hand held GPS that can save trackline, routes and waypoints. Can output them to my PC. Can connect to my PC to provide GPS position data. I trust Garmin units.
- Plotting software that will accept track lines, waypoints and routes from my GPS. Use NOAA Rnc and ENC charts accurately. Take position data from my GPS. Iím a big fan of Rose Pointís Coastal Explorer.
- An accurate heading source for use with the courses, bearings and ranges you learned form the survey. The heading source can be an accurately compensated magnetic compass or any number of electronic gizmos. Iím a big fan of a quality magnetic compass properly compensated. They are not subject to electronic / electric failure.
- Radar. If youíve got a good unit that accurately determines range use it. You can use it to keep a safe distance off a hazard abeam, know the range to a landmark ahead where you make your next course change. If youíve done your small boat survey well, done your chart work and see the small boat GPS track line does not plot in the good water on the NOAA chart you donít need to be alarmed. You can still use the ranges, bearings and courses from the paper chart.

- Dividers, compass (the drawing kind) and a rule of some sort. I prefer for small boats like we all run the Weams and Plath rolling plotter. These tools are used with your paper chart to plan your route.

If these techniques of inshore piloting are new to you then you might consider practicing first is some less demanding passages. I see at the southern end of El Capitan a bay called Kosciusko Bay. Skinny with rocks but straight and short. Should be a straight forward small boat survey. And when youíre ready plenty of room to turn the big boat around in there and head out. Too bad the bottom charts as rocky. What a secure anchorage that would be to ride out a blow!


I hope you and all reading this find it helpful. And if any of the experienced boaters here can improve my post please jump in! Weíre all here to share and learn.
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Old 01-07-2017, 12:17 PM   #22
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Murray, is there a lot of harbor ice in Kitimat?
No, just near shore in small bays with creeks when the temperatures dips to below -10C.

Our slip in MK Bay is near the outside so we never freeze in...boats on the other side of the finger get frozen in.
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Old 01-07-2017, 12:26 PM   #23
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We tried Tenass from the east a couple years ago on a high tide and the water got a little too thin for our 48 inch draft so we went around. Have done Rocky Pass several times on high tides. It is well marked. We did Canoe Pass on the east side of Etolin Island last year on a high tide. The thin part is only a couple hundred yards and the water was clear enough you could see your way through.

Transiting from Wrangell to Sitka, I like the Rocky Pass route since I can time things to hit the pass at the right time. I don't mind the trip down Chatham Strait but count on things being a little rolly at the south end. The main reason we would take Chatham is to hit Tebenkoff Bay and the fishing around the Coronation Islands.

Thin water is not a matter so much of charts but all visual from the bow. When you can see the bottom, the chart plotter and sounder are simply records of where you have been so when you leave you can follow the same successful track or avoid an unsuccessful track. There are places where we anchor that the entrance can only be used above certain tide stages.

Tom
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Old 01-07-2017, 01:17 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by tpbrady View Post
We tried Tenass from the east a couple years ago on a high tide and the water got a little too thin for our 48 inch draft so we went around. Have done Rocky Pass several times on high tides. It is well marked. We did Canoe Pass on the east side of Etolin Island last year on a high tide. The thin part is only a couple hundred yards and the water was clear enough you could see your way through.

Transiting from Wrangell to Sitka, I like the Rocky Pass route since I can time things to hit the pass at the right time. I don't mind the trip down Chatham Strait but count on things being a little rolly at the south end. The main reason we would take Chatham is to hit Tebenkoff Bay and the fishing around the Coronation Islands.

Thin water is not a matter so much of charts but all visual from the bow. When you can see the bottom, the chart plotter and sounder are simply records of where you have been so when you leave you can follow the same successful track or avoid an unsuccessful track. There are places where we anchor that the entrance can only be used above certain tide stages.

Tom
Excellent info.....thanks.
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Old 01-07-2017, 01:18 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Portage_Bay View Post
Ken,

I want to give my $0.02 on passages like Tenass. My opinion is based on experience, I recently retired from running an oceanogrpahic research boat. In that capacity I was called on to make these kinds of passes often with minimal information. I donít want this to come across as preachy or lecture-y. I know a lot of the members have decades of experience. Some however do not. I donít know where you are on the spectrum.

Here goesÖ..

Deciding to run Tenass Pass is like everything else on a boat, a risk / benefit calculation. Risk here being the key. As others have mentioned you will be in a remote area with little help available if something goes wrong. You are running a twin screw boat with little or no protection for the running gear. A tiny bump on the rocks and a lot goes wrong in an instant.

Many here have already mentioned it, the most important thing is survey the pass from your small boat. Preferably with a good sounder. I prefer to make my survey at low water. If youíve got a good GPS even better. If that GPS can be mounted on the bridge of your big boat so you are dealing with very similar system errors as you make your passage and following the GPS track line better still.

Make your passage 1 Ė 3 hrs before high water. The exact timing will depend upon anticipated currents in the pass. You want as much rising tide left under you with as little current as possible.

The survey is made at low water so you can see more of the dangers. The passage is made near high water for obvious reasons, before high water so that you might float free if you get stuck. A note on that. Ak is a mixed semi diurnal tidal cycle. Two highs and two lows per tidal day. Often there is a considerable difference in height between the lower high tide and the higher high tide. If you are transiting the pass on one of those days, especially during spring tides consider that you can be aground for a day or more if you get stuck near the higher high water. And with Akís extreme tidal ranges you could be high and dry perched on a rock doing considerable damage to your hull and running gear.

If at all possible time your passages so that you are stemming the current. This allows you to move more slowly over the ground and to be able to stop and back away more quickly.

As you gain experience and local knowledge with Tenass Pass your transit window times widen. But on your first few passages be very careful, even if it means transiting the pass at inconvenient times.

Now I want to talk about charts, electronics and judgment. Again, not trying to be preachy.

Sounders.
I would not make a pass like Tenass without a good sounder. However, in places like S.E. Ak the bottom is so vertical that some times the sounder will tell you that you are aground as you strike the rocks. Go slow. Be careful. Know what the transducer offset, what the indicated depth is. Under the keel, under the transducer, at the water line? It is usually best to not run the sounder on auto range and auto gain in these situations. You donít need it getting confused and trying to find the bottom just when you need it most. Choose an appropriate range and adjust the gain before starting in. I prefer to have a sounder that charts the bottom as well as gives a digital depth reading. Sometimes the numbers get jumpy and there is no good way to make sense of the information. A chart of the bottom shows the trends even when the signal gets a little noisy.

GPS.
All non-survey grade GPS receivers are subject to error. There are no exceptions. Do you know how accurate yours is? How repeatable yours is? If the ďwobbleĒ in your system is 3 meters (not at all unusual despite manufacturer's claims) that means the confidence in your track line is 6 meters, 20 ft. GPS error increases in narrow steep sided channels. I know, the experts say it isnít so but Iíve seen it many times. And what GPS are you using? A purpose built marine unit or a tablet / phone GPS? The tablet / phone units are damned good but I wonít use one for narrow tricky passes. The short version is that well designed marine units prioritize accuracy over speed of fix. Most tablets / phones prioritize speed of fix over accuracy. And worse yet, the phone / tablet wonít tell you when itís doing that!

All of this is to say use the GPS, but donít trust it blindly. I don't have good charts of Tenass Pass here but it looks like there are some skinny spots that at low tide are 11 meters, 36 ft. If I'm right about 20 ft confidence and 36 ft wide safe channel that's just 8 ft of sure safety on either side of the centerline of your boat. If your boat is about 13 ft beam take 6.5 ft away and you're down to almost nothing. Oh yeah, and know where your GPS receiver is. If it's off to one side of centerline......

Charts.
In these kinds of places I will only use official charts, in Ak that would be NOAA charts. Cartographers have to make decisions when creating charts. They have to reduce a massive amount of data to a usable chart which means they throw out some data. Then as other chart makers use the NOAA charts to create their versions even more decisions are made resulting in more data loss. Generally non NOAA charts are very good. But Iíve seen more than a few instances where important features were missing.

And, things have been missed. A few years ago I found an uncharted pinnacle in a narrow pass Iíd transited dozens of times. That time I was a bit to the right of my usual track line. I canít recommend that as a way to get your heart rate up.

Paper vs electronic charts. Itís your choice and often a financial decision. I like having both aboard but then my employer required it and paid for them. These days Iím a little stingier with the number of paper charts I carry. However, if I wanted to transit the little passes around Prince of Whales Island to my favorite fishing holes frequently Iíd buy the relevant paper charts.

RNC (raster) vs ENC. In US waters NOAA provides them free of charge. Carry both. They offer different strengths and weaknesses. I have found in some less traveled areas they donít 100% agree. In those cases I put more trust in the RNCs for the same reasons I trust NOAA charts over other charts.

Beware of the dangers of overzooming electronic charts, no matter who made them or created the software. It leads to a false sense of accuracy that simply is not there.

A comment on the accuracy of charts. Know the dates of the survey the charts are based upon. I am not saying the surveyors and cartographers of old were sloppy and inaccurate. I am saying they and the mariners the charts were created for used different tools. Bearing and range were the tools of the trade ďback in the dayĒ. Early in the days of GPS and electronic charting it was not uncommon to find significant errors. Almost without exception the errors I noted were a displacement of the charted areas on the earthís surface. That is to say the bearing and distance between two points were nuts on, but might not be accurately placed on the earthís surface. An old pilot would round Pointy Rock Shoal day beacon at a known distance and bearing, set the course for Bent Tree Point for a safe clearance, make adjustments for set and drift and all was hunky dory. A GPS user like we all are these days would round the day mark by eye, point and click a waypoint off Bent Tree Point, activate the route, mash the autopilot button and if the charted area were displaced on the earth might wind up parked on the beach.

Hydrorgraphic services have been very diligent in correcting these errors but some of the less traveled areas are still not quite right. Be careful. I found one not too long ago. Slipping between an island and a peninsula, a narrow but deep channel and almost straight. Piece of cake, plot my course, look out the windows and keep Ďer in the middle. I glanced over at the electronic chart and saw by that we were on the logging road on the peninsula! A friend found a rock awash the hard way a few years back putting too much trust in a GPS chart plotter running non NOAA charts.

Putting it all together.
Hereís how I would approach my first transit of Tenass Pass. Assuming from your first post that you have considerable experience with El Capitan.

- Head over to southern El Capitan the day before. Anchor as near to Tenass Pass as you can and be confident in leaving the big boat for some time.

- Survey Tenass Pass at low water. Take your time. Find all the scary spots. Use your eyes as much as your GPS and sounder. Do you know how to spot natural ranges and how to use them? If not thatís another subject.

- Your survey line will be all zigg zaggy, not a usable track line. Using what you learned run the pass in your small boat as if you were running it in the big boat. Same speed you intend to run the pass in the big boat. Repeat until you are confident you have a trustable track line and good familiarity with the lay of the land. Both bottom and land marks on the shore line. I like to carry a waterproof note book and make sketches and notes.

- Back aboard the big boat chart your track line. If possible on both electronic and paper. Note where turns need to be made, courses to steer, safe distances off hazards, anticipated water depth at key points adjusted for tide height and transducer offsets. Work it all out in your head before you go. When you are in the pass is not the time to be figuring things out.

- When time and tide are right, probably the next day, make the run.

- LOTFW. Older captains, I guess Iím one now, like to remind the youngsters who professionally grew up on electronic navigation Look Out The F...ing Windows! Not just stare out the windows but know your courses, bearings, ranges and land marks. Use Ďem all.

- Stay ahead of your boat. A key to successful navigation and piloting is thinking ahead. Where you are now was solved a while ago, where you are going next is what you are thinking about. Electronic navigation encourages thinking only about where you are now. I can be as guilty of that bad practice as anyone!

Local Knowledge. There are two kinds, yours and theirs. Yours comes from experience with Tenass Pass. The more you run it the more you know it. Just donít get complacent and sloppy. Theirs is not to be trusted until you know for sure. Listen to the locals, particularly with respect to cautions and warnings. But do you own homework before you head into the pass.

The tools I like to use
- NOAA charts. All 3. Paper, RNC and ENC
- A quality marine grade hand held GPS that can save trackline, routes and waypoints. Can output them to my PC. Can connect to my PC to provide GPS position data. I trust Garmin units.
- Plotting software that will accept track lines, waypoints and routes from my GPS. Use NOAA Rnc and ENC charts accurately. Take position data from my GPS. Iím a big fan of Rose Pointís Coastal Explorer.
- An accurate heading source for use with the courses, bearings and ranges you learned form the survey. The heading source can be an accurately compensated magnetic compass or any number of electronic gizmos. Iím a big fan of a quality magnetic compass properly compensated. They are not subject to electronic / electric failure.
- Radar. If youíve got a good unit that accurately determines range use it. You can use it to keep a safe distance off a hazard abeam, know the range to a landmark ahead where you make your next course change. If youíve done your small boat survey well, done your chart work and see the small boat GPS track line does not plot in the good water on the NOAA chart you donít need to be alarmed. You can still use the ranges, bearings and courses from the paper chart.

- Dividers, compass (the drawing kind) and a rule of some sort. I prefer for small boats like we all run the Weams and Plath rolling plotter. These tools are used with your paper chart to plan your route.

If these techniques of inshore piloting are new to you then you might consider practicing first is some less demanding passages. I see at the southern end of El Capitan a bay called Kosciusko Bay. Skinny with rocks but straight and short. Should be a straight forward small boat survey. And when youíre ready plenty of room to turn the big boat around in there and head out. Too bad the bottom charts as rocky. What a secure anchorage that would be to ride out a blow!


I hope you and all reading this find it helpful. And if any of the experienced boaters here can improve my post please jump in! Weíre all here to share and learn.
Thank you.
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Old 01-07-2017, 01:34 PM   #26
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I've got a feeling Ken E can pilot his boat just fine without the lecture on safe boating and don't think this is what he was seeking in original post on the two passes.
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Old 01-07-2017, 01:41 PM   #27
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Portage Bay

What a great write-up. Thank you. I would add, in the PNW getting somewhere is very weather dependent. Poor to non visibility can occur quite suddenly rendering clear weather only passages less than passable.
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Old 01-07-2017, 02:01 PM   #28
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My initial question was based on what I heard from the OP and the others responding. I do pass through tight places occasionally using just the methods outlined. We've taking our RIB and checked out shallow areas, we've used a pilot to get into Romora Bay. It wasn't meant to imply anyone fell off a turnip truck, but I was reading about a pass that is obviously challenging and potentially very problematic and given other options, I would take them. I was just trying to understand the reason others would go through such effort to take this particular pass. I've heard all the responses. It is definitely not a pass I would select. As to Ken E's scenario I would choose Option 2 if in a slow boat, from where I sit now. However, that would be dependent on local knowledge I'd pick up when there. If in a faster boat, I would select between option 1 and 2. I would just not choose to go through the trouble of option 3 to save 40 miles, but that's my choice. As to paying the price for safety, I would, but I don't think anyone here is suggesting doing anything they feel is unsafe. To me it's also the amount of effort certain routes require to be safe. But then I prefer running outside than running the ICW on the east coast. I'm capable of navigating the ICW carefully. Like the outside route.

I respect those navigating in Alaska. Nothing here has even tempted me to where I would choose Tenass. In fact, it has reinforced my reluctance to do so. Could I do so safely, depending on the boat, yes. I have learned a lot about the reasons many here would attempt that route by asking questions, which was the point of my initial question. I often take the path of least resistance because that makes my boating more pleasurable. I leave areas like Tenass to be explored by RIB or smaller boat. That's my choice and I do respect the choices others make.

As to a safety lecture, it wasn't intended as that, but a follow up to a question. However, I won't apologize for bringing the safety issue into the discussion. If some felt I was insulting their professionalism, then for that I do apologize.
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Old 01-07-2017, 02:14 PM   #29
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Personally I don't see allot of advantage trying Tenass Pass

If you think of a starting point as Davidson Inlet...

If the seas are coming from the west... Hug the southern tip of Whale head Island, then bear north west to the lee sde of Warren Island putting the seas on your port quarter.

If the seas are coming from the south... Hug the northern side of Hecta Island then make a sharp northerly turn as you come out of it's protection, putting the seas on your stern.

Easy Peasy, and SAFE
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Old 01-07-2017, 05:52 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Ken E.,
Another thing to be aware of is current. May only be a short time of slack water.
If you could contact anyone at Sakar Cove or NewTokeen they they would know all about Tenass Pass. Or my friend but he lives in a cabin on Marble Is and only goes to Craig once a month. You may see his Willard moored on a ball in the west side of Marble Is. People in Edna Bay would probably know too.

Top pic is the float at Edna Bay.
Second pic is my friends Willard In a cove on the west side of Marble Is.
Eric, thanks for the pictures. We anchored in Sarkar last July 4th and watched their fireworks. Do you know where their guide boats usually fish? I'd guess out toward Coronation island.
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Old 01-07-2017, 09:37 PM   #31
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No I don't.
I know the Craig boats go to the west coast of Noyes Is. Well actually the commercial fleet is there going around and around. Maybe only the highliners can get in line ??? I'm not sure where the commercial sport fish boats go.

Coronation Is is different. I think it's got lots of restrictions on access. Don't think you can land a boat on the beach. But as to fishing I have no idea.

One place I do know that is great for fishing is on the west coast of Kuiu Island. I know guys in Thorne Bay that think Tebenkof Bay and The Bay of Pillars is wonderful .. and these guys fish. Especially Halibut. Do more research but I'll bet Salmon fishing is great too. No Tenass Pass there though. Gotta go down around Cape Decision or up through Rocky Pass and Kake.
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Old 01-07-2017, 10:01 PM   #32
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I don't know of any restrictions on landing boats. The beach in the back of Egg Harbor is pretty nice but Egg Harbor is exposed to the north and experiences williwaws in southerly winds. We spent one night there and got blown around alot with the south winds. Fishing was pretty good for bottom fish.

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Old 01-08-2017, 09:57 AM   #33
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Rocky Pass

There is no need to worry about using Rocky Pass. For the last ten years we have taken our 36ft trawler through this Pass without any problems. Follow recommendations from Douglas and you will be fine. Plenty of places to drop the hook and fishing is fantastic. Yes, it saves time, distance and is well protected from the weather.
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Old 01-08-2017, 10:02 AM   #34
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Last year we explored this area and took our dingy to Tenass Pass looking to do what you are contemplating. We also spoke to a resident fisherman on Marble Island and our conclusion is that we would not attempt the Pass even at high tide.
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Old 01-08-2017, 10:34 AM   #35
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There is no need to worry about using Rocky Pass. For the last ten years we have taken our 36ft trawler through this Pass without any problems. Follow recommendations from Douglas and you will be fine. Plenty of places to drop the hook and fishing is fantastic. Yes, it saves time, distance and is well protected from the weather.
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Thanks for that.....good to know.
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Old 01-08-2017, 10:35 AM   #36
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Last year we explored this area and took our dingy to Tenass Pass looking to do what you are contemplating. We also spoke to a resident fisherman on Marble Island and our conclusion is that we would not attempt the Pass even at high tide.
Thanks.....very helpful information.
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Old 01-08-2017, 02:40 PM   #37
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My initial question was based on what I heard from the OP and the others responding. I do pass through tight places occasionally using just the methods outlined. We've taking our RIB and checked out shallow areas, we've used a pilot to get into Romora Bay. It wasn't meant to imply anyone fell off a turnip truck, but I was reading about a pass that is obviously challenging and potentially very problematic and given other options, I would take them. I was just trying to understand the reason others would go through such effort to take this particular pass. I've heard all the responses. It is definitely not a pass I would select. As to Ken E's scenario I would choose Option 2 if in a slow boat, from where I sit now. However, that would be dependent on local knowledge I'd pick up when there. If in a faster boat, I would select between option 1 and 2. I would just not choose to go through the trouble of option 3 to save 40 miles, but that's my choice. As to paying the price for safety, I would, but I don't think anyone here is suggesting doing anything they feel is unsafe. To me it's also the amount of effort certain routes require to be safe. But then I prefer running outside than running the ICW on the east coast. I'm capable of navigating the ICW carefully. Like the outside route.

I respect those navigating in Alaska. Nothing here has even tempted me to where I would choose Tenass. In fact, it has reinforced my reluctance to do so. Could I do so safely, depending on the boat, yes. I have learned a lot about the reasons many here would attempt that route by asking questions, which was the point of my initial question. I often take the path of least resistance because that makes my boating more pleasurable. I leave areas like Tenass to be explored by RIB or smaller boat. That's my choice and I do respect the choices others make.

As to a safety lecture, it wasn't intended as that, but a follow up to a question. However, I won't apologize for bringing the safety issue into the discussion. If some felt I was insulting their professionalism, then for that I do apologize.
Roger that, Bandb. Thanks for the comments.
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Old 01-08-2017, 03:53 PM   #38
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The guy wants to get some information on a possible navigable pass so he can make an intelligent decision. Instead he gets a lecture on boating.



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Old 01-08-2017, 04:00 PM   #39
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Thank you.

+1

I didn't find a way to give a Thank You to his post on the iPad app.
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Old 02-17-2017, 01:40 PM   #40
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Just found this thread.
. I lived at Edna Bay in the late fifties, and have been through Tenses pass many times going to and from Deweyvile (Sarkar Cove/Lake). We had outboard powered skiffs. I cannot recall any larger boats going through, and would hesitate to recommend it.
As I remember Brockman is even more challenging.
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