Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-08-2014, 11:31 AM   #1
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,849
The Chesapeake Bay

Discussion about the Chesapeake Bay always takes me back to memories of cruising the Bay. To me the Chesapeake is like cruising no where else. It is definitely not island cruising. If you are looking for beaches you will be disappointed. Water clarity is not part of the equation. No, not any of those.

The Bay takes adapting to a little change in cruising attitude. It is about coves, villages, tradition, wildlife and food. The season changes are the best times. Slow down, and enjoy what it has to offer. I love it.

Timjet and wife are on their first cruise of the Bay. I can't wait for their report and impressions. After slowing down to the short distances and many places it just gets better. I'm waiting Capt. Tim.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2014, 12:52 PM   #2
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,903
Don...I think hope you are correct that every first timer to that bay should slow down and drink her in....it is geologically a unique place ...I believe that magic is true and therefore it can give back the same.

Funny though the mind.....

I have been assistance towing in the same place now and finished 12 years of between 200-300 runs up and down an 18 mile stretch of NJ ICW each year to the point I can almost do it blindfolded with a little hint or two . At about year 6-7 I started wishing I had more room to run...new sights, sounds, smells, wildlife, etc...

Then in a year or so I knew change wasn't in the wind so I went back to looking at everything a little differently...the grass growing on the dayboard pilings at low tide, how each and every osprey nest was a bit different, the ripples in the waters and exactly what they meant.

This all was a good thing..as I grow older I realize my wild and crazy days of thinking space, flying, world travel and even mega-boat deliveries are all getting way fewer and farther in between....

So slowing down and appreciating things on a micro-scale instead of the macro-scale should become my focus...I think some philosophies accentuate this...such as the raked sand garden in Japan.

Many say the Chessie is a cruising ground no one will master or become bored with in a lifetime of boating...I agree...all you have to do is embrace it.

Reading James A. Michener's Chesapeake will either bore you to death or make every cruise there a permanent piece of your life.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2014, 07:58 PM   #3
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,817
Probably my favorite part or the bay are the tributary rivers. Wonderful cruising, beautiful scenery, interesting towns and many to choose from. Plan to spend every other week cruising the tributaries next summer.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2014, 10:06 PM   #4
Guru
 
mbevins's Avatar
 
City: Windsor
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Keeper IV
Vessel Model: 44 Viking ACMY
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1,305
Those are great words. We are scheduled to start the
Loop next summer, when we head North for the summer of 2016 we plan on spending the entire summer in the "Chessie" and retreating back to Fla. for the winter. Then go back North the next spring. I just couldn't imagine only spending a couple of weeks there and being satisfied.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Trawler
__________________
"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."

mbevins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2014, 10:43 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Bill Ranson's Avatar
 
City: Deltaville, VA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cork
Vessel Model: Halvorsen GC32
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 116
I have been boating on the Chesapeake for over 30 years and still haven't seen it all......it can be the most beautiful water one day and the most challenging the next.
Bill Ranson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 12:19 AM   #6
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
I became intrigued with the Chesapeake when I read James Michener's book of the same name. I have no idea how accurate the book is, nor if his rather romantic portrayal of the bay has much or any relationship to reality.

I remember reading his "Hawaii" way back when. The book was a good read, but I was living there at the time and had been for awhile, so even at a young age I recognized that it played pretty fast and loose with reality more often than not.

I have to say that to me, the United States stops at the eastern bank of the Mississippi River and the southern border of Oregon. Outside of that rectangle, it can be given back to whoever we got it from with the exception of Maine, which we should keep because the coastline and the boating up there (and the boats) look almost as intriguing as out here.

But the eastern seaboard below Maine has never held any interest for me with the one exception of the Chesapeake because of the book. I'll never see the bay in person, but I would be interested to know from people with a lot of time or experience there if Michener's portrayal of it bears any resemblance to reality.

Granted, the book was written a long, long time ago and things change, even faster today than yesterday. But I wonder if the nature and feel of the bay itself ever was, or still is, as he tried to portray it?
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 01:40 AM   #7
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,152
To me a lot of cruising is like no place else as all areas are different. But that said I completely agree with the wonder of the Chesapeake Bay. We'd never been there until the last two years. Now we've been four times. Annapolis is one of our favorite places. We don't normally sail and never do the actual work but we've gone sailing on captained boats there and enjoyed the beauty of the bay. We've cruised the bay slowly and faster. Starting at Virginia Beach, Hampton, all the way to Baltimore. We also fell in love with Cape Charles. Then of course add a side trip up the Potomac to Washington or through the canal to the Delaware. Not to overlook the James River or York River. There's just a world of so many wonderful places to cruise and visit. And if you depart through the canal to the Delaware or come to it that way, there's a whole river of sights to see on the Delaware too. Not the expansiveness of the Chesapeake but a much neglected area. Seems like we forget it though.

I believe you could return to this area hundreds of times and still see something new each time. Our kind of place. The one we leave always knowing there is more to see next time.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 07:55 AM   #8
Curmudgeon
 
BaltimoreLurker's Avatar
 
City: Stoney Creek, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moon Dance
Vessel Model: 1974 34' Marine Trader Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,629
There is a reason the area is called, "The land of pleasant living." And it ain't just because of the Natty Boh.
Attached Images
 
BaltimoreLurker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 08:30 AM   #9
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,849
Marin, Michener's book, while fiction, is a plausible example of a Chesapeake family followed through three centuries. It took place along the banks of the Choptank River with the plantation located on an island at the mouth. There was an island there that was "drowned". That is what happened to the plantation in his story.

I would not expect everyone to see the Bay as I do. After being around its shores and cruising it for 40 years, it still has a draw for me. The fall is absolutely the best. I'm sure I would feel similar about the PNW, but this is what we have. If Maine were not so remote, it would probably be my favorite east coast cruising area.

No, we don't have the mountains and beauty of Alaska. We do have Maine, New England, the Chesapeake, the Carolina/Georgia low country, Florida, and the Keys. A short hop off shore to the Bahamas. I'll take it. That doesn't mean that I won't charter in the PNW. Just waiting for the opportunity to do that.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 06:49 PM   #10
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstruck View Post
If Maine were not so remote, it would probably be my favorite east coast cruising area.
If Chesapeake Bay, the PNW, the Carolina/Georgia low country, Florida, and the Keys, or wherever else, weren't so remote for us Mainers.....

We need technology to come up with an instantaneous boat transport device so we could all explore all these great cruising areas whenever we wished.

No, on second thought, maybe that's not such a good idea after all.
__________________
David Hawkins
Deer Isle, Maine
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 07:37 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
johnma's Avatar
 
City: Philadelphia
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dreamers Holiday
Vessel Model: Mainship 390
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 322
Michener's book got me interested, then a friend asked us to spend a long weekend boating on the Chickahominy which we took to the James then out to the bay proper, then i helped another friend bring his boat from Solomons Island to Annapolis. All 3 of these events happened one summer in the early 80's and I was hooked. bought a boat, then another boat then another boat! I figure that since that time I've cruised about 10% of the bay and its tributaries. I read once that there is more coastline in the Chesapeake than the rest of the U.S. combined. when we finally retire in two years we will start at Havre de Grace on the northwest side and head south to Virginia Beach then cross over to Cape Charles and head north to the Chesapeake and Delaware canal at the very top going up each river and creek on the way. Doing that from mid April to mid November i plan to take two years to see it all. I've been from the canal to Norfolk many times, but that's no way to see this bay properly.
John
MS390
johnma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 08:14 PM   #12
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,849
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwhatty View Post

No, on second thought, maybe that's not such a good idea after all.
Well, you can stay up there, but you won't get the T shirt.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Moonstruck T shirt.jpg
Views:	101
Size:	88.8 KB
ID:	33556  
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 08:27 PM   #13
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstruck View Post
Well, you can stay up there, but you won't get the T shirt.
Too cold for T shirts up (down east) here anyways.
__________________
David Hawkins
Deer Isle, Maine
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 08:30 PM   #14
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,797
And between Maine and the Chesapeake, you have coastal NH and, MA the islands (Elizabeth, MV, Nantucket, Block), Narragansett Bay, Long Island Sound and it many offshoots, New York City, the Hudson River, Lake Champlain, and on down the line. And of course north of wonderful Maine, the fabulous Canadian Maritimes.

As I have posted before I have been very fortunate to have cruised and boated both coasts fairly extensively, including some of the Great Lakes and most of the Gulf Coast.

When it came time to go cruising and living aboard full time, we were in Dallas. It took us far less than a minute to decide where we would do that. Never regretted it for a second.

I feel (mostly) sorry for people with closed minds who judge and write off places they have never seen. I did some of that when I was a punk kid; couldn't understand why you'd want to be anywhere but California and the west. Then got the notion at 21 to drive my van across country all the way to Cape Breton. What a wonderful and mind and eye opening experience that was. So a few years later in life when we started to have professional opportunities that took us all over the country, we were excited about it, and subsequently enriched by it.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 08:43 PM   #15
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstruck View Post
I'm sure I would feel similar about the PNW, but this is what we have........No, we don't have the mountains and beauty of Alaska. We do have Maine, New England, the Chesapeake, the Carolina/Georgia low country, Florida, and the Keys.
Don, thanks for the reply that Michener wasn't far off in his depiction of the feel and mood of the bay. It sounds like a very interesting place to explore.

I agree with your implication that one should get the most out of the situation and location one is in. Sometimes we're lucky in that we get to determine those things, sometimes we have to play the hand we're dealt.

I was lucky in that I was able to determine where I ended up.

I made the decision to move from Hawaii to the PNW/BC standing on the aft deck of the BC ferry Queen of Prince Rupert at the end of a camping/fishing trip in the Yukon when I was driving my Land Rover back to Oakland, CA to put it on the ship back to Hawaii.

When the fog burned off to reveal the upper channel of the Passage, it totally blew me away. Mountains coming right out of the water, glaciers, waterfalls, and all the life one gets in this part of the world both on shore and in this protected saltwater environment. When I saw it, I knew I had to move here.

I'm sure Eric Henning can relate to how I felt, and still feel, when I get up into that country. I've done it a lot by air (first photo) but never by water other than that first ferry ride. (Of the thousands of photos I've taken here, the last photo I think best captures what I love about boating here.)

We've taken the GB as far up as Desolation Sound, which is the start of what I consider to be the great coastal country, and we've taken our small boat up to Queen Charlotte Strait, Knight Inlet, and Blackfish Sound, which is farther up into the great coastal country. But we've never gone into "Eric Country" by boat.

I seem to need to have high and wild country around me with big rivers, big forests, and big animals. Not that I've ever been interested in actually hiking the mountains here--- that's why God invented horses, and later, helicopters.

I've used both, and am now investigating the acquisition of a drift boat so I can start exploring (and fishing) the rivers with the rivers doing all the work. I'm fundamentally lazy and am a big believer in internal combustion, hay, or gravity doing as much of the job as possible.

Last year my videographer and I spent part of a day driving around the shoreline of Long Island exploring some of the harbors, looking at the cool old houses, and so forth. Very interesting stuff to look at, and we had a great time talking to some of the local commercial fishermen. But the totally featureless terrain had no appeal to either one of us.

I've been to the South Carolina, both the Low Country and farther inland, a number of times for work, and I've been visiting friends in southern Virginia (Virginia Tech) and North Carolina (Winston-Salem) for decades. The Blue Ridge and Appalacian hills are beautiful to visit, no question, and the history in that region is fascinating. But it all lacks the wildness and scale that I like so much.

Maine's coast is certainly not like the PNW, at least in terms of altitude. But the coastline itself has a wild ruggedness that I find really appealing. I love northwestern Scotland for the same reason.

Anyway, perhaps someday I'll re-read "Chesapeake" and re-kindle my interest in the bay.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	97
Size:	80.3 KB
ID:	33557   Click image for larger version

Name:	denman%20peak%201.jpg
Views:	95
Size:	98.0 KB
ID:	33558   Click image for larger version

Name:	Sunset and Fog.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	117.7 KB
ID:	33559   Click image for larger version

Name:	weynton%20passage.jpg
Views:	95
Size:	75.0 KB
ID:	33560  
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 10:18 PM   #16
chc
Senior Member
 
chc's Avatar
 
City: Essex, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Scooter
Vessel Model: 1984 Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 310
It seems to me that all of our respective cruising areas; PNW, New England, Great Lakes, Gulf coast, ICW are beautiful in their own way. Each has its special places, as well as some that are, perhaps, not so special. Challenges abound in each locale, as do the many serene and amazing sights specific to that area. I'd be happy to be on a boat almost anywhere, in almost any of our cruising locales; and be really thankful that I can.
__________________
Scooter
1984 Californian 34 LRC
www.scootersvoyage.blogspot.com
chc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2014, 10:38 AM   #17
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
My wife and I grew up in Maryland but didn't start boating until fifteen years ago. We had a smaller boat and would boat on the Chesapeake Bay but seldom went far.

We retired to Charleston, SC and eventually purchased HIGH COTTON.

This past May we cruised up the ICW to the Chesapeake and did a complete circle starting on the east side all the way to Havre de Grace and down the west side and up the Potomac to DC. We saw many places we had never seen and some familiar places as well. The entire trip lasted seventy six days. I am working on a "blog" of sorts and I'll post a link when it's done.

The Chesapeake Bay is a wonderful place to cruise and should be on everyone's list if they can do it.

The main down side is, it gets cold in the winter and most boats have to be hauled and winterized for six months.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2014, 01:05 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Slowboat 37's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 191
Being called the Great Northwest is well deserved. While cruising Puget Sound is a little too populated to be called an adventure, I do enjoy the view of two volcanoes both of which I have been on the summit of( Mt. Rainier and Mt baker) But farther north to the San Juans and into B.C. it gets really special. I have had the pleasure of cruising Desolation Sound several times, and there is nothing like taking a freshwater shower under a small water fall that comes down off of a vertical rock wall that you can come up next to while standing on the deck. I also spent ten days in Knight inlet in in a 16ft. Lund. We put in at Port Hardy on the north end of Vancouver Is. crossed the Queen Charlotte strait and up the inlet. As Marin says, mountains strait up out of the water and all manner of wildlife. The region is so large it is easy to feel like you have the place to yourself. We haven't been up there for a few years but we are going back.
__________________
Steve Pryor
1979 Hershine 37
Lilli Belle
The Great North West
Slowboat 37 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2014, 01:08 PM   #19
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,849
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
My wife and I grew up in Maryland but didn't start boating until fifteen years ago. We had a smaller boat and would boat on the Chesapeake Bay but seldom went far.

We retired to Charleston, SC and eventually purchased HIGH COTTON.

This past May we cruised up the ICW to the Chesapeake and did a complete circle starting on the east side all the way to Havre de Grace and down the west side and up the Potomac to DC. We saw many places we had never seen and some familiar places as well. The entire trip lasted seventy six days. I am working on a "blog" of sorts and I'll post a link when it's done.

The Chesapeake Bay is a wonderful place to cruise and should be on everyone's list if they can do it.

The main down side is, it gets cold in the winter and most boats have to be hauled and winterized for six months.
Ron, I knew you had lived in Maryand, and knew of you cruise this year. I didn't know that you were basically cruising the Bay for the first time. I can't wait to read your blog. You did a great job on your cruise "up" the St. Johns River.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2014, 03:00 PM   #20
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,903
I have to giggle at the either/or mentality.

I love snorkeling...tough to do when I was loving living on Kodiak in AK....

I love salmon fishing....tough in NJ...thankfully there's an OK salmon fishery in the Great Lakes only about a 6-8 hr drive away...but a weeks cruise by boat at least.

I love flat's fishing for bonefish...never saw on one in Puget Sound.

I absolutely love the skylines of the PNW but then the sight of active lightening in a gigantic thunderhead out over the Gulf Stream with the setting sun behind it and a couple Coconut palms and a white sandy beach framing it all is dag gone near as spectacular...it just isn't there in the morning mist when you wake up.

Well heck..I guess that's why I like cruising...so I CAN see different sights and yes/no...I wouldn't spend a lifetime cruising the Chesapeake...but it certainly will be a lingering spot as long as I'm cruising the East Coast.

To say your satisfied with the view you have from your boat to the horizon...then like arguing about what is a trawler...I'd debate whether you are truly a cruiser.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012