Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-17-2015, 04:33 PM   #21
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,733
I'm even more happy after following this thread that we have the benefit of both bow and stern thrusters to get us into our scarily tight home moorage shown below

Seriously, though, you guys and ladies who have to put up with jam packed marinas and narrow slips have both my commiserations as well as my admiration for the boat handling skills that you have acquired or are in the process of acquiring. I've hardly ever docked a boat at a marina and was not looking forward to coping with the variety of unfamiliar marina accommodations and conditions that we were going to have to experience on our now cancelled 2,000 mile trip to Canada and back this summer.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	AtMooring2.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	97.2 KB
ID:	40240  
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
David Hawkins
Deer Isle, Maine
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 04:36 PM   #22
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwhatty View Post
I'm even more happy after following this thread that we have the benefit of both bow and stern thrusters to get us into our scarily tight home moorage shown below

Seriously, though, you guys and ladies who have to put up with jam packed marinas and narrow slips have both my commiserations as well as my admiration for the boat handling skills that you have acquired or are in the process of acquiring. I've hardly ever docked a boat at a marina and was not looking forward to coping with the variety of unfamiliar marina accommodations and conditions that we were going to have to experience on our now cancelled 2,000 mile trip to Canada and back this summer.
Hang out with an assistance tower for a couple days...

They'll show you how to dock 2 boats at once....and one boat won't have an engine let alone thrusters!
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 04:44 PM   #23
Dauntless Award
 
Wxx3's Avatar
 
City: New York, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dauntless
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 - 148
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,313
Frg,

I had almost the same experience the second time I left our slip in City Island. The wind was blowing in and I was more concerned about the pilings 80 feet to our stern then the boat in the next slip.

And feeling that I could back her out with LESS power than the previous time, that's what I did.

The wind grabbed the stern and started pushing it to starboard. Within seconds the boat was alomsot all the way out, but perpendicular to our slip and worse, the anchor pulpit of the boat next slip was overlapping the fashion plate.

Julie yelled stop and I hit the gas, allowing his anchor to rip through the fashion plate.

A few days later, with WHITE duck tape covering the wound, we spent the rest of the summer in New England.

The duck tape is still there, looking at bit ragged, but hardly noticeable at a distance.

A good reminder for me that complacency can bite you in the ass at any time.

Have fun and don't worry.

No Harm, No Foul.
__________________
M/Y Dauntless, New York
a Kadey Krogen 42 Currently https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Blog: https://dauntlessatsea.com
Find us: https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Wxx3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 05:05 PM   #24
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
as long as you have good rub rails and the slip isn't affected by strong currents or horrific winds....a few inches to spare to me is a GREAT slip.


My liveaboard slip in Annapolis was about an inch wider on each side. I couldn't even go all the way back to the bulkhead as the flare at the bow prevented me going further in.


The beauty of that slip was I could pull in and didn't even have to tie up for hours.


Don't let people talk you out of a narrow slip...it might be trcky getting in sometimes...but may be worth it in the long run.


Not there so I really cant say what is good or not or your ability to handle the boat...but narrow slips aren't necessarily bad.
While I'd prefer wider, the slip width isn't what I'd see as the biggest issue. To dock, I'd pull to the dock just as if I was doing a side tie behind the actual slip. But I'd get square first and then straight in. If conditions warranted you could even walk it in.

What I see as more difficult is leaving the slip, especially if a wind coming from his port. You have no space on your starboard and without thrusters you have the challenge of trying to turn to head out with no area to allow your stern to swing. Same thing if you decide just to back on out to your port. Now you have have the bow to worry about plus no room to swing.

Normally in a narrow slip you just back straight out, don't worry about which way. Then you use the slipway to turn and head out. Here you've lost half of the slipway.

I did notice nearly every other boat there is docked stern in. However, I don't see that helping getting in and out much if any. I think most just do it for each of getting to the walkway. On the inside slip where he's located, he has a walkway beside him.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 05:10 PM   #25
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Wide or narrow...no matter.


Especially when bow in.....lots of room to pivot before fully leaving the slip.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 05:21 PM   #26
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Too-narrow fairways are also problematic for maneuvering in or out a slip. ... Normally, docking is the greatest boating stress-point for me. (Self!, let's not goof this!)

Even plenty of fenders won't guarantee avoiding white-rubber streaking along the hull.

Five fenders per side:

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 05:25 PM   #27
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Wide or narrow...no matter.


Especially when bow in.....lots of room to pivot before fully leaving the slip.
Keep in mind that you have decades more experience than the OP, with every type boat and situation imaginable. Pivoting is patience and angle and, yes, can be done in this slip. In fact, for that reason, I'd find bow in the preferred docking. Not a bad idea to have a horizontal fender of some type either, such as a fender board, for the port side.

I've docked and undocked power boats since I was ten years old, so 35 years. But I do try to recognize that it's much different for someone on his 4th time.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 05:26 PM   #28
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Too-narrow fairways are also problematic for maneuvering in or out a slip. ... Normally, docking is the greatest boating stress-point for me. (Self!, let's not goof this!)
Not sure which is worse...narrow fair ways or wider ones where the boats with large unyielding anchors are well past the pilings.

Well, I'll take narrow and all the boats back behind the pilings as a mistake will only pin you against pilings...the other scenario involves a lot of glass work...
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 05:34 PM   #29
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
There ought to be a rule against anchors sticking out into the fairway!
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 05:36 PM   #30
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
There ought to be a lot of rules about some things and less about others...just a day on TF and all I can say is help from a much higher power couldn't hurt.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 06:55 PM   #31
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,854
frgeorgeh,

From your pictures it appears that you are in a corner slip. That compounds the issue especially on leaving. You do not have swing room to keep your stern quarter from hitting the walkway. That is not a good place for a novice. Most captains don't like a corner, and the dockmaster probably knew this. As narrow as the slip is, you would probably have to lay up against the walkway before pulling forward.

Like has been said, "no harm. No foul". All lived for another day. It can happen to any of us.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 07:02 PM   #32
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Keep in mind that you have decades more experience than the OP, with every type boat and situation imaginable. Pivoting is patience and angle and, yes, can be done in this slip. In fact, for that reason, I'd find bow in the preferred docking. Not a bad idea to have a horizontal fender of some type either, such as a fender board, for the port side.

I've docked and undocked power boats since I was ten years old, so 35 years. But I do try to recognize that it's much different for someone on his 4th time.
I teach novices all the time too...so I am sympathetic yet also optimistic.

Either bow or stern...again..no big deal if you go slow and have decent rubrails.

Pilings can be a friend if your boat has the basics.

Again...narrow is easier..get a corner in and gently apply power...as long as the rub rails are doing their job. Wider is where momentum and indecision become an issue.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 07:05 PM   #33
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,602
At least the slip next to you is empty. Someones anchor hanging out there will raise the pucker factor a bit!
__________________
Archie
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Englewood, FL and Cape May, NJ
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 07:08 PM   #34
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
sorry..... just noticed the concrete pilings which aren't all that great on rubrails.


if I couldn't rig something slippery, a wider slip might be in the cards for me.


while I prefer narrow slips for a lot of reasons...this might be an exception....
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 07:21 PM   #35
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,602
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
sorry..... just noticed the concrete pilings which aren't all that great on rubrails.


if I couldn't rig something slippery, a wider slip might be in the cards for me.


while I prefer narrow slips for a lot of reasons...this might be an exception....
Hang on, the OP's port side pilings are wood. (post#13, 3rd pic from the bottom.) The concrete piles are on the opposite side of the floating dock.
If it were me, I would try to rest the port bow against the outer piling, using a line if necessary, then bump the stern around until parallel to the floating dock with a big ball fender on the stbd stern just in case.
__________________
Archie
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Englewood, FL and Cape May, NJ
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 07:39 PM   #36
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
I teach novices all the time too...so I am sympathetic yet also optimistic.

Either bow or stern...again..no big deal if you go slow and have decent rubrails.

Pilings can be a friend if your boat has the basics.

Again...narrow is easier..get a corner in and gently apply power...as long as the rub rails are doing their job. Wider is where momentum and indecision become an issue.
There are a lot of us who prefer not rubbing our rubrails as illogical as that sounds....lol

Of course a lot of boats that don't have "decent rubrails" either, meant to endure pilings.

Getting in is easy. Learning to get out when the wind isn't cooperating is still a challenge and requires learning. I would also say it's something best learned from an experienced captain or operator.

We all have our areas of discomfort too based on our experience. I personally don't like med mooring and definitely haven't done it enough to say I'm comfortable doing it. Given a choice between it and another suitable alternative, I'm going to choose the other option.

I would simply say the location of his slip is more difficult to get out of than most of the other slips in that marina. Now it also has some nice pluses if he masters that aspect.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 08:20 PM   #37
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonstruck View Post
frgeorgeh,

From your pictures it appears that you are in a corner slip. That compounds the issue especially on leaving. You do not have swing room to keep your stern quarter from hitting the walkway. That is not a good place for a novice. ...
That was my instinct. I'm a berth away from the main dock walkway. No problem here.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 09:24 PM   #38
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,928
Based on as many near misses posted...and what I see nearly every day...maybe learning to accept plan A minus might take a lot of stress out of docking...

That may include something other than a "perfect" docking and a touch of a piling in a useful manner.

Always preferable to the slam and gel/paint scratch.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 09:27 PM   #39
TF Site Team
 
Pack Mule's Avatar
 
City: Paris,TN
Country: USA
Vessel Name: William
Vessel Model: Outer reef 32
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
Next time Marty, when in that situation, have a nice fat fender you can hang just a bit back from the bow for the bow to press against. Have a line from the forward cleat down round a dock bollard and coming back aboard and lightly cleated so it can quickly be reached, freed, and pulled quickly back aboard.

Then, in idle forward, with rudder hard towards the dock, wait until the stern has swung out about 50, (bow restrained against dock, quite gently actually, buffered by that fender), let loose the line round the dock bollard , haul it aboard, (or have someone you trust doing that), while you put her in reverse (wheel midships) and back away until well clear, then hard over away from said dock, forward gear, and you're away, with landlubbers gaping with open mouth at your skill.

Fgeorge take note also…if wind blowing you onto the dock, never try to leave by pushing off the bow, and never try to fend a heavy boat by hand in those circumstances either, as it's a recipe for what Marty just described. Thank goodness the lady didn't suffer serious eye injury.
Thanks Pete I'm gonna save this . My daughters sunglasses saved her from serious injury .
__________________
Marty
Pack Mule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015, 10:00 PM   #40
Guru
 
Off Duty's Avatar
 
City: Tampa
Country: USA
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 843
Hey brother, in (my) order of precedence:

Quote:
Originally Posted by frgeorgeh View Post
...Someone tell me it's ok! Pretty freaked out right now. Only had the boat a month and only driven her 4 times
It's definitely ok!
I don't recall your experience level from your intro, but heck, even the most experienced skippers have a bad day!

Don't let something like this get in your head.
No damage, no injuries, and nobody died.
I'd say that's a pretty successful docking!

Quote:
Both events caught me totally off guard.
Why? And I mean this with all due respect, but you can see what's ahead of you, right? You know the wind, current, clearances. Figure out a plan and an alternate and decide if it's worth it? Remember, in the end, you're in charge. If you don't like it, don't do it.
(ok, that's all the sermon you'll get from me padre! When/if we ever meet you'll understand this part....that's not a halo, it's a glare!)

Quote:
My boys had to fend me off.
As someone else said, please don't use body parts to do that.
It really doesn't work all that well with big boats.

Quote:
Feeling so frustrated cause last time we went out it was text book and no issues.
And the next time it may be just the same or even better.
One thing I learned in law enforcement, was regardless of the similarities in the calls, no two were alike. Stay flexible. The more practice you get, the better you'll be.

Quote:
Damn near hit boats in my slip way.
...horse shoes and hand grenades....
That's about the only places "close" counts.
The fact remains, you didn't.
That says something to me about your skills and judgment.
You apparently remained calm and dealt with the matters at hand!

Quote:
My ego sure took a hit today cause the last time went so well. Ugh!!!
...NEVER LET EGO DRIVE...

Things will get easier over time.
But just like anything else, about the time you think you've got it mastered, it'll jump up and bite you in the arse!

OD
__________________

Off Duty is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012