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Old 05-07-2013, 01:02 PM   #121
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Hi Sergio,

Here some data for 07/05/2013 to 09/05/2013 (Wind force, direction, Wave height, period) This will give you some idea.

Recife BR - Wind force 2 to 4 - N to NE - Wave height not given - period not given
Natal BR - Wind force 3 to 4 - ENE to E - Wave height 1.2 to 1.4 m - period 8 to 12 sec
São Luis BR - Wind force 3 - ENE - Wave height 0.1 to 0.2 m - period 2 sec
Surinam - Wind force 4 - N to NE - Wave height 1 to 1.4 m - period 7 to 13 sec
French Guiana - Wind force 4 - ENE - Wave height 1.5 to 1.7 m - period 7 sec
Guiana - Wind force 4 - ENE - Wave height 0.5 to 0.7 m - period 3 to 4 sec

Cees
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Old 05-07-2013, 01:12 PM   #122
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Hi Sergio,

Here some data for 07/05/2013 to 09/05/2013 (Wind force, direction, Wave height, period) This will give you some idea.

Recife BR - Wind force 2 to 4 - N to NE - Wave height not given - period not given
Natal BR - Wind force 3 to 4 - ENE to E - Wave height 1.2 to 1.4 m - period 8 to 12 sec
São Luis BR - Wind force 3 - ENE - Wave height 0.1 to 0.2 m - period 2 sec
Surinam - Wind force 4 - N to NE - Wave height 1 to 1.4 m - period 7 to 13 sec
French Guiana - Wind force 4 - ENE - Wave height 1.5 to 1.7 m - period 7 sec
Guiana - Wind force 4 - ENE - Wave height 0.5 to 0.7 m - period 3 to 4 sec

Cees
That doesn't sound like fun.
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Old 05-07-2013, 01:24 PM   #123
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not exactly a holiday adventure.

Even in December or January I don't think the conditions are so much better. The Atlantic is rolling in on this coast and the energy must go somewhere.

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Old 05-10-2013, 08:34 AM   #124
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We came from Turcs and Caicos with force 5 as aind and 8 feet as waves. Its not the ideal weather but not impossible. To cross the golf channel, we got 21 knots as north wind, and a lot os waves.
Lets discuss this passage (north of South America) because I think that of we have more crew, we can came little close the coast, about 80 miles

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Old 05-10-2013, 08:35 AM   #125
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Where did you got those informations?

Sergio "Alemao" Sztancsa, Sent from my iPhone using Trawler
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Old 05-10-2013, 08:51 AM   #126
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Hi Sergio,

As I never passed close to the coast from Caribean to Brazil, always came from direction Cape Verde, I tried to find information from people who did.

From Magazine "Latitude 38" Link: Latitude 38 (CTRL "F" and use "Brazil" it's hit #5)

"As for the idea of sailing from the Caribbean to Brazil, we’d have to suggest that Harker talk to Mark Schrader, who just completed the Around the America voyage with Dave Logan, Herb McCormick and David Thoreson aboard the 54-ft Ocean Watch. A two-time singlehanded 'round-the-world racer, Schrader told us that the worst part of their trip was sailing from the Caribbean down the coast to Brazil, as it pitted them against a current that ran as strong as five knots. That's the reason that grizzled cruisers who want to sail from the Caribbean to Brazil often do so by way of Europe. Sure, it's much longer, but they get the wind at their back and favorable current almost the entire way."

From "Noonsite" Link: Noonsite The global site for cruising sailors

Caribbean, St. Martin to Angra dos Reis, Brazil
By Sue Richards — last modified Jun 27, 2008 08:12 PM
Published: 2008-06-27 20:12:26
Topics: Atlantic Ocean West
Countries: Brazil , St Martin
I'm planning a sailing trip from St.Martin in the Caribbean south to Angra dos Reis, Brazil. When would be the best time of the year, in your opinion, considering prevailing winds and currents? I know the current set is north from Cabo Sao Roque, is there a preferable time to do this passage when the current is less. I believe that south of this point the current is favourable, so I imagine that the timing of this passage is not so crucial. I would appreciate your view.

That route is not as easy as it sounds as you will have a very strong current against you. Much depends on the kind of boat you have, and how powerful an engine. Personally I would not do it and I do not know of anyone who had attempted that route, although I am sure that someone has actually done it. Look up a similar report as posted on noonsite:

Caribbean East to Southern Brazil

Regards

Jimmy Cornell noonsite
26-06-08
I have read the enquiry regarding the route S. Martin/Brasil and have some pertinent info to write.

Some Brazilian yachts have indeed made this passage, including myself in 2002 in a 45 cutter yacht. It took us 22 days with very little motoring. Another yacht, a 40 ft. sloop, made it recently in 20 days by the same route. Arrival point has been Natal, on the eastern most edge of the Brazil coast.


Strategy used has been the following:

Time of the year - early March. Wait in S. Martin until a depression shows up in the north Atlantic, creating northerly winds in the Caribbean. Leave the most eastward bound possible. We have sailed one tack this way almost 600 miles east, losing very little latitude!

When wind starts to veer from northeast to east, leave the course, round down southeast but continue to "strive" for east, having as reference a waypoint about 35Deg W / 5Deg N. degrees W.

The wind will continue to veer to east, then southeast. After that waypoint, as wind allows, start to head south to reach the coast not west of Natal. This is the part of the route which is most affected by the west setting current, so keep your eye on your destination so as not to be pushed west to Fortaleza!

It looks like the best time of the year is around March, as another attempt we made in June 2003 was disastrous, the wind has been east for weeks and we gave up!

An alternative route (which I have not tried) is leaving from southern ports of the Caribbean and motor sailing close to the South American coast. Some delivery skippers do so, tacking near the coast in depths of about 15 meters to minimize the effects of the current. In their description of these passages they reccomend starbord tack during the day, and port tack during the night, with mainsail up only and engine full time...not very pleasant!

Good luck!
Marçal Ceccon - Author of Cruising the Coast of Brazil


As it seems Marçal Ceccon know people who did it with a sailing vessel very close to the coast, on the 15 meter line. Try to contact him, think he is a Brazilian.

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Old 05-10-2013, 09:14 AM   #127
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Sergio, changed somthings in the previous message, pls read it again.

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Old 05-10-2013, 09:46 AM   #128
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Where did you got those informations?

Sergio "Alemao" Sztancsa, Sent from my iPhone using Trawler
Hi Sergio,

Link; Tide Forecast

(have to go to a client, i come back later here..)

Scroll Up; here you can select a "Country" and a "Station" give it a "Go"

You now see detailed information about the Tide for the coming 3 days (for the selected "Station").

Now in the Bar;

Tide Times | Sea Conditions | 7 Day Tide Table | Live Weather | Tide Station Map | Location Guide

you can select detailed information about the weather, Sea conditions.. I like the "Tide Station Map" Play in this selection with "Stations" you can select on the Map the Blue dotted Stations and play with the selection criteria. Amazing.
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Old 05-17-2013, 04:34 PM   #129
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Hi sergio,

I understand you are on-board, heading for St. Martin/St. Maarten. How is all going onboard.

Please give us an update of your amazing voyage to Brazil.

Cees
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Old 05-17-2013, 05:14 PM   #130
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Hi Cees,
I'm still at home. I intend to go to Luperon in the end of June, fix the eletrical problem with the battery service bank and leave the boat at Luperon during the hurricane season.
In the end of the year, we could cruise little bit more in the Caribeam sea.
It's a beautiful place to just pass thru.
Let's keep in contact. I'm thinking in your cruise idea.
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:14 PM   #131
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What the best place to leave the boat during the hurricane season, Luperon-Dominican Republic or San Juan- Puerto Rico?
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Old 05-23-2013, 07:15 AM   #132
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What the best place to leave the boat during the hurricane season, Luperon-Dominican Republic or San Juan- Puerto Rico?
Both places are not free of risk, see this link.

Link: Landfalling Puerto Rico / Dominican Republic / Haiti Hurricanes (Since 1950)

As you can see in the tables the wind speeds are the highest in the Dominican Republic and more often Hurricanes happen there.

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Old 05-23-2013, 07:21 AM   #133
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What the best place to leave the boat during the hurricane season, Luperon-Dominican Republic or San Juan- Puerto Rico?
Luperon, no question, is a good hurricane hole but has very limited yacht services. Puerto Del Ray Marina on the east coast of Puerto Rico has dry storage and wet slips for over 1,000 boats. There is a West Marine close buy plus all the other marine services & support. The marina has a haul-out program for hurricanes according to a friend who keeps his boat in the area. He did advise though, like most states in the US, the local tax man will come looking if you stay to long.
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Old 05-23-2013, 07:37 AM   #134
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Hi Sergio,

See also these two links.

Link: Cruisers Forum "Has anybody left their sailboats in Puerto Rico during the hurricane season"

Link: Puerto Del Rey "Hurricane Season Programs"

Grtz Cees
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:07 PM   #135
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I'll leave my boat in Luperon, but what would be the safest way, leaving docked wet or dry storage?
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:11 PM   #136
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Hi Larry,
Where are you now? I saw that to stay in Puerto Rico more than 2 months, I'll have a high cost. I think that Luperon can be the best option.
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:18 PM   #137
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Maybe taking of the bimini, deflating the dingy and storing inside the boat.
Cees, I'm going there, Luperon in the midle of June to fix the eletric problem, buy new service batteries and navegating for a little hours just close Luperon just to navegate a little. Would you like to enjoy us?
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Old 05-24-2013, 04:52 PM   #138
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I'll leave my boat in Luperon, but what would be the safest way, leaving docked wet or dry storage?
Dry storage is definitely safer plus it's better for the boat in my opinion.

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Hi Larry,
Where are you now? I saw that to stay in Puerto Rico more than 2 months, I'll have a high cost. I think that Luperon can be the best option.
We're in the Central Bahamas currently

If you need marine services, Puerto Rico is better than the DR with it's connection to the US: same phone service, delivery companies, no duty, parts accessibility, etc. Yes, PR would be more expensive but the cruising is better than the north coast of DR. You could spend a good part of a season between Culebra and Vieques (Spanish Virgins). You'll do fine were ever you leave the boat.

When you do go to PR, you'll be 300 plus miles closer to Brazil and the Mona Passage will be behind you.
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Old 05-24-2013, 06:16 PM   #139
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I'll leave my boat in Luperon, but what would be the safest way, leaving docked wet or dry storage?
Hi Sergio,

If possible i would store her on the hard an secure her to the ground.

I call you tomorrow mobile, I am out tonight.

Grtz. Cees
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Old 05-27-2013, 04:15 PM   #140
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Found this blog about a trip from Barbados to Rio......

Link: TIKI 38 PERFECT BLEND CRUISE FROM CANADA TO URUGUAY

Reply by alex on May 7, 2013 at 7:58pm

hi guys

i will make a full report about that leg later in my Facebook blog from our trip to south since many people think its impossible, or at least very hard to do I expect to encourage some of them to come south to visit our still unspoilled cruising grounds... but here is some advance about the Tobago/ Cabedelo leg..In the facebook report we will describe how we planned and prepared for that particular trip and add the photos we took as well.

we made it good to Brazil. better than expected, almost 2400 NM in 19 days, average 5,4 knts (we could made better though since the first 4 days towards north east of Barbados were very slow, then it became a one tack leg forcing some windward ( mostly direction 120 degrees true) that were slowing us a bit but winning windward which was important for us just in the case we found dead east winds later , but still a decent speed over 5 kn average (over 130 NM a day always). We had all the time NE winds over 17 kn apparent sometimes reaching 33 knots apparent, but never reefed, and had both main sails up and the jib, not the genoa. Later when we felt that we had enough windward and could make an more easy direct track and also less hitting against the swell, after we passed the Amazon river entrance, gave up 30 degrees till making 150 true. After we gave up we were averaging over 7KN all the way till we reached the height 100 NM away north of Fortaleza city, then the wind easy for 2 days for first time, motored less that 30 hours till finding cape Calcanhar which were the only 2 days we were tacking a couple of times... then gone south and found sw winds for first time... no doldrums... there is a book from Bruce Van Sant, named the Thornless path south, that describes the best way to sail down from the US to Trinidad. He says: to go south first go north (to win winward) ....we followed that tactic along the islands and that was what we made for this trip. It payed off.

we discovered some water inlets in the boat while rough seas, on the holes on the bulkheads that are holding the rods for the beams, with waves breaking over the boat like in a surge and with extreme pressure. to get in and out of the fore cabin we were forced to stop the boat so we dont got water in them. we also stopped the boat once a day before sunset (3 PM) to make a general check out from the boat, which proved to be a wise idea, we always discovered something lose or something to be changed. the fact we pushed hard against the wind with full sails up had some logical consecuences in breaking things that you wont break in a weekend cruise. we took like 4 full buckets of water just on the port fore cabin (lots of food missed) , we got wet and all deck hatches proved to be not water safe, need to change the design hope the Griffith hatches are a fine solution and not too expensive... but it was a good lesson of what we need to improve in our humble boat, and what the limits are...


the Monitor windvane performed well but since it was attached on the tiller connection bar ,its a too long distance from the axle of the rudder (double as recommended) it was describing too deep "S" paths to correct the course , what was slowing our performance, so we decided to switch to the autopilot that gave us another knot of speed and a straight GPS path (with steady and constant winds)

our fridge failed due a poor electrical design that I maid , so we missed also all the frozen (and expensive) meat we had. Jen my thai wife was sea sick like hell for a week, but recovered after that to a more better stage... all of us lost many pounds , wich can be used as a diet method...

AIS was a great help, and we had just one really close approach with all alarms on (radar and AIS) that was solved by a call on the VHF and a good willing ship captain on the other side that accepted our suggestions where to pass us without any problems..

with all the alarms we installed as part of the trip preparation, AIS, radar , depth sounder it became easy to make watches that gave me even chance to take short naps inbetween. A german cruiser i met in Luperon told me that he even goes to sleep and wait for the alarms to wake him up... after cape Calcanhar we found many small fishing boats (we were very close to shore)... we were very happy to take the outher route since it was really relaxing with no land or boat traffic to get stressed...

the life aboard was fine, with some bad moments were we fight but I managed to cool myself down and learn from the situation to be a better (or less bad) leader.... i demanded too much discipline from a crew that wasnt disciplined nor experienced in blue water sailing, and to be fair I had to foreseen things that i did not... so here is a public apologize for my great crew members Chris and Jen. I will try to be wiser captain in future...

One of the motors was out of service after a rough night (it got lose from its place and slamming for some time before we realized what was happening.)


the boat is really very safe and seaworthy, simple to manage and repair... its little bit old fashioned compared to other fancy cruisers, but i`m happy to have it specially because my poor experience as a cruiser (at this point 5000 NM plus all the racing years i had in my youth, but they don't really count, cruising is about something very different) . this boat was supporting some `mistakes`from my part with no major problems...

later after Cabedelo in the southern Bahia State, we run over a reef and stayed for 4 hour complete out of the water, the noises that came from the hulls were horrible and I thought we were having bad damages or even lose the boat, but after we managed to relase the boat setting 4 heavy anchors out and waiting patiently for the tide to come up, I made a quick dive to check the damages out, nothing really bad happend, other than some deep scratches with exposed wood that we need to solve as soonest before the wood get rot. the starboard rudder was also affected in a major way, but still in function.

the Yamahas proved to be excelent motors and i am very happy with them. but i am not happy carrying gasoline on board. we had 650 liters (2 x 200 liter barrels plus the jerry cans and the day tanks topped), that we bought in trinidad at a price of 2,7 TT dollars the liter ( 1 US dollar / 6 TT dollars ), so less than 50 cents a liter. in Uruguay we pay more that 3 times that much.

Hope we have no major problems till reaching Uruguay. Our new wharramist friend Rogerio from Rio de Janeiro will make a leg from Ilha Grande till Florianopolis with us, 400 NM in 3 days....

our general average is 130 to 160 NM a day , the most we made was 180 NM till now, which is unthinkable in a heavy loaded cruising monohull (I remember that my past racing days in monohulls where we were happy if we made over 100 NM , with a 27 feet boat) .

to finish this report i want to mention that our water line is 15 cm (6 inches) down, we are heavy loaded with all the materials we carry to upgrade the boat in Uruguay plus all the crap we collected in those wonderfull Bahamian and Caribbean islands...


hope you understood my bad english...i will answer any question you like to make.


cheers

alex

Now take a look again at post #112

This is exactly what they did. From Barbados 120 Degrees, from 02 04 N -:- 037 13 W 150 Degrees.

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