Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-08-2014, 02:32 PM   #41
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
I have not yet calculated the mileage yet from NYC to the Ms. River. I used to live in NY State and I promise you that I would want to spend as much time up there as possible. Possibly haul out again in the fall and come south for the winter - by air.
That would then take 3 years total. One year to get to the Hudson Valley in NY and haul out. The second year to traverse the state and haul-out again before the Great Lakes and the third year to spend mostly on the Great Lakes and then back home in the south in the fall and early winter.
An old Jewish expression comes to mind: "I should live so long".
The problem with that plan is, you're out of a boat except for the time you spend on the loop. We use our boat as a second home if we're not cruising.
__________________
Advertisement

rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 02:45 PM   #42
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cygnus
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,378
I went back to Capt. John's site that was linked on page 1 of this thread. I'd been there before, but sort of forgot about it.

Good stuff, but he does have some strong opinions. Here's one I can't agree with:

"5. ) The semi-displacement trawler, along with cabin cruisers were designed for higher cruising speeds in the 17-24 knot sustained cruising range, and have a very poor (make that terrible) fuel economy."

I'll grant you that for motoring frugality, you can't beat a 100% full-displacement boat. Better yet, a sailboat with the mast removed.

My last boat was a go-fast, and yet it could be very economical if I kept it below hull speed. The boat I have now, although beamy, heavy and slow, is technically a semi-displacement hull. I don't see that as a significant drawback. In fact, it brings my draft down (up?) to just over 3', even with a keel. That's a big advantage on some stretches of the loop.

Then there's this gem:

"That's right! Don't let any boat salesperson try to convince you that two engines won't burn twice the fuel as one. It simply is not true - they will!"

Without re-litigating this one, let's just say that not everyone agrees with Capt. John on this.

I'm still determined to do the Down East Loop first, but maybe after that I'll try the Great Loop.
__________________

CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 03:54 PM   #43
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
The problem with that plan is, you're out of a boat except for the time you spend on the loop.........
Not quite. I haven't sold my 39' sailboat in Kemah, Tx. yet. That might become my winter home. If I do sell my sailboat, we were thinking of getting an RV for winter and I know lots of sailboat people on the 3rd coast.
At this point in time, we don't see ourselves becoming dirt dwellers anytime soon.
__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2014, 05:30 PM   #44
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
Yes, don't agree with all of Capt John's thoughts but still a great site. I recommend reading the stories of many loopers to see what they enjoyed most and also to see what you might enjoy but the parts you might not as much as they did. And they'll all have their own prejudices. I recall one we read that believes the right boat to do it is a shallow draft power catamaran. Time after time they talk about how their shallow draft benefited them. Now others might point out all the places they couldn't get a slip. Some tell you nothing over 40' and yet I know those who have had a great trip in a 72' Hatteras. Now, I'm not encouraging 72'. Actually our research shows 60' to be the limit for docking in many areas. And fuel economy plays a different role for different people. John tells you motor in a sailboat for the best and he's right. Well, except a kayak would top that. Yes, a single engine 325 hp will use less than two 1500 hp engines even when they're run at idle. But then the twins won't drink nearly what some believe when run slowly. We have a boat we won't use for the loop but with a top speed of 40 knots and twin 1360 hp but at hull speed of 9 knots it still gets 1 nmpg. We just don't often run it that speed.

As to being without the boat, that's why we'd get it down the Mississippi before winter.

Also, there are ways to explore and cover the ground without actually doing a loop in one continuous cruise. You can do the New York canals and return. Explore Canada. Even make a trip through to the Great Lakes and back out. You can come up the Tenn Tom and explore the TN River and Cumberland and Ohio. Now the actual loop is a nice goal but not the end all. If my time was limited I'd choose something less rather than rush through the loop like it's a race.

There are other great trips to make. One we intend to do but in parts is the Great U. From Alaska around and up the east coast and through to Maine or Halifax or Montreal.

I see people do the loop and miss the wonderful rivers. Also, if you don't get south often then it really seems a shame to do the loop and not make it to the Bahamas while the boat is close. And if you don't get to the Gulf much then why not a side trip to New Orleans and to Texas. People just skirt the edge of the Great Lakes but never actually explore the incredible beauty each of the lakes has on all sides.

The beauty about the loop is it's given a structure to encourage cruisers and it circles so doesn't retrace steps. But many of those areas are worthy of being retraced. I might suggest outlining where you want to go and what you most want to see and then see how that fits.

We have what I would call for lack of better a Boating Master Plan. It includes all the parts of this country and the world we want to cruise and see at some point. It includes the Loop, probably more than once. But it also includes the areas off from the loop that often get overlooked. We've cruised the East Coast, the Gulf and the Bahamas several times and yet only touched the surface. I don't think we'll ever run out of islands and they're all just a little different. One of the highlights of our last trip was a small town, Apalachicola. We normally have just gone past, crossing the gulf and not taking the ICW. But this trip we went to Carabelle and then Apalachicola. We will definitely return. The artistry there was incredible, before even considering the rest of the area. Many loopers never get to Boston or Nantucket. Some never get time on the Chesapeake and some see Annapolis but never Baltimore.

The loop can be done in 6 months but I would personally not attempt in less than 12. Still there are many ways of splitting that. Get through Chicago and get your boat down to the TN river and then you can continue there then or later to complete it. There are some nice boating days from there forward in the fall and then you head down the TN Tom and you have great winter boating from that point forward.

Reading and exploring all the areas of the loop can be fun, get you excited, and help you figure out what you want to see and do. One person will like the Erie canal better and someone else the Great Lakes. One person will love the Chesapeake and another will love the Keys. Some miss the keys even taking the Okeechobee across. On the other hand we've been to the keys many times but made our first trip to the Okeechobee this February.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 10:49 AM   #45
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,793
Suggest you reconsider. We did a 6,000 mile trip in 14 months and always thought that we were rushed, missed many things and now regret that we didn't take longer.
__________________
Marty
Bay Pelican is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 11:01 AM   #46
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bay Pelican View Post
Suggest you reconsider. We did a 6,000 mile trip in 14 months and always thought that we were rushed, missed many things and now regret that we didn't take longer.
We took a one month cruise from Charleston, SC to Sanford, FL on the St. Johns River and felt the same when we got back. Missed a few towns and anchorages.

I think if you're going to do it, you should take your time and do it right. For most of us, we only get one chance.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 11:03 AM   #47
Guru
 
City: Fort Myers
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 956
Due to somewhat limited vacation schedules we would look to cover ground early then slow down, some of our most memorable stories are stopping in downs and meeting people, amazing what stories you hear from the local gin mill sometimes. The canal systems of NYS and fantastic, well run and enjoyable, not so much in the commercial zone of the St Lawrence Seaway where we spend a night waiting our turn. The Rideau is also fantastic, feels like you have gone back in time, great scenery. All this examples above was over the course of many trips just broken up, like many have said it's really the journey and not the destination that makes it.
Marlinmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 11:12 AM   #48
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
One additional comment. You need to know what kind of endurance you have, meaning how long in a continuous cruise without a break to go home for a bit. I know many do the loop in a continuous cruise, but that's not for us, personally. We find two months at a time to be about our maximum preference and then a brief trip home. It might be longer for you. But this is a pleasure trip and should not be governed by racing through it or pushing oneself to the point the enjoyment is lessened. Our present cruising pace is about 8 months a year so for us it would likely be a two year endeavor.

We don't want to ever become tired of cruising or tired while cruising. We want to look forward to exploring the town where we're headed next. How did we arrive at two months? Well, we've found when we're out nearly two months and headed toward home, we tend to cut stays shorter, skip towns, and hurry home. We refresh and then ready to go again.

Many loopers find they do want to spend the holidays at home. Others are fine being away. For us, we have things we do and love to do during the holidays, people we see, so we do not cruise during that two week period. We have to (as in want to very much, not forced to) go to NC to be at the orphanage with the kids we adore there for Christmas day, that night always to family in Myrtle Beach, and then of course with family and friends home in Florida. We love cruising but not ready to sacrifice holidays as we know them.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 12:04 PM   #49
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,919
Of course there's usually two side to a coin....

As someone said...you may only get to do it once so if it's too elongated....one of many reasons could cause a cruiser to miss the majority of the loop.

Many who do the loop that really enjoy cruising ....plan on returning to those stretches they really enjoyed...if not the whole loop.

Those that live aboard and don't want o winter over have to do the loop at least "seasonably" fast...and return to those stretches or do the loop again to offset and see the places missed the first run.

Life's a gamble in many ways....study alternatives well before the final call...
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2014, 10:42 PM   #50
Guru
 
River Cruiser's Avatar
 
City: UMR MM283
Country: US
Vessel Name: Northern Lights II
Vessel Model: Bayliner 3870
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,228
A friend and his wife started on the loop last sept. spent the winter in Florida, they were back here last week and I asked him how far he thought he would get this year and his plan is to make it to Chesapeake bay spend some time there and then back to Florida and Bahamas for the winter. His original plan was for 2 years, I'am betting it's going to be longer. The MS 430 he bought for the loop was going to be sold when they were finished, I'ld now bet he'll keep it in Florida for use in winter and have his 52' Pluckebaum houseboat to use here on the upper Mis. the rest of the year. I doubt he's told his wife of this possibility yet. If you see a MS 430 named SaSea Sally home port Louisiana, Mo. Say hello to Clay and Sally, they're good people.
__________________
Ron on Northern Lights II
I don't like making plans for the day because the word "premeditated" gets thrown around in the courtroom.
River Cruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 08:51 AM   #51
Senior Member
 
Great Laker's Avatar
 
City: Spring Lake, MI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Great Laker
Vessel Model: American Tug 34
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 321
We started the Great Loop in Sept. 2012 could have made the circle without rushing if we weren't delayed in late July, 2013, by 3 weeks of flooding in the Erie Canal. Due to commitments at home, we reluctantly put our boat up in heated storage in Brewerton, NY, and came back this June, 2014, to resume the trip.

We are now on Day 270 and have cruised 5,800 miles. Here is a summary of our route to date.

Grand Haven, MI
Chicago, Ill
Cairo, Ill
Chattanooga, TN (side trip)
Mobile, AL
Tarpon Springs, FL
The Keys, FL
Chesapeake Bay
New York, NY
Hudson River
Lake Champlain
Montreal, QC
Ottawa, ON
Kingston, ON
Brewerton, NY
Thousand Islands, St. Lawrence River
Kingston, ON

From here we will do the following:

Trent-Severn Canal
Georgian Bay
North Channel
Mackinac Island
Grand Haven, MI

The total trip will take approximately 300 days and 6,800 miles. It is an incredible adventure which I highly recommend!

You can learn much more about the specifics in our daily blog below.
__________________
Larry
American Tug 34 - Great Laker, and Gold Looper
Home port on the vast unsalted Lake Michigan
adventuresofgreatlaker.blogspot.com
Great Laker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 09:45 AM   #52
Guru
 
City: Fort Myers
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 956
That sounds fantastic "Great Laker", wish you continued success in your adventure!!
Marlinmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 12:37 PM   #53
Guru
 
healhustler's Avatar
 
City: Longboat Key, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bucky
Vessel Model: Krogen Manatee 36 North Sea
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,181
I envy you, Laker. We had a plan to begin the loop in Spring 2014, but flopped badly from lack of real intention and commitment (ya gotta be really planning for it well in advance). Now we're scheduled for Spring 2015. I better get my arse in gear on unfinished projects, and get serious about the planning. Can't help but get excited reading your itinerary. How is the 34' doing as your loop platform? Would you change anything?
__________________
Larry

"I'd rather be happy than dignified".
healhustler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 01:34 PM   #54
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
Our plan right now is Spring 2016.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 03:26 PM   #55
Veteran Member
 
Cat Daddy's Avatar
 
City: Boyd, Texas
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cat Daddy
Vessel Model: PDQ mv/34
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 99
I also am shooting for spring 2016. I hope the Asian carp issue is a non-factor in 2 years.

Rafe
Cat Daddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 04:02 PM   #56
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Daddy View Post
I also am shooting for spring 2016. I hope the Asian carp issue is a non-factor in 2 years.

Rafe
That latest Asian or Silver Carp news is very puzzling. They've had a tremendous amount of them being found dead just below Kentucky Dam and Barkley Dam. The report was over half a million below Barkley Dam. And it's the only fish found dying. Now some thought was bow hunters and snaggers on the ones below Kentucky Dam but that would seem hard to explain Barkley.

There have also been commercial fishermen trying to catch them and in 2013 even a tournament where over 80,000 pounds were caught. There is actually one processor taking them and then sending them to China. They are eaten in other countries. They're distributed some to Chinese communities in the US, also used for pet food and fertilizer. The problem is that while other fish bring $0.60 per pound, Asian Carp bring only $0.10. Both current processors are in Illinois. Work also continues on trying to develop a means to poison them without hurting anything else.

The attention has gone to keep them from moving North into the Great Lakes but they are a big problem on the Ohio River as well and worrisome to Kentucky and Tennessee.

I don't think they'll be a non issue in two years but doubt the ability to make the loop will be stopped.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2014, 06:33 PM   #57
Senior Member
 
Great Laker's Avatar
 
City: Spring Lake, MI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Great Laker
Vessel Model: American Tug 34
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by healhustler View Post
How is the 34' doing as your loop platform? Would you change anything?
I consider this the ideal boat for a looping couple.

------------------------------------

Not too long (increases most costs), not too high (at 12' it gets under almost all bridges without opening), not too wide (at 13' 3" it fits into virtually all marina slips).

The hull/engine is suited to offshore crossings (Lake Mi, The Gulf, Atlantic off New Jersey, Lake Ontario), is efficient at low speeds (2.3 gph at 9 mph) yet will go 18 mph when needed, and has a range of 1400 mi with a 150 mi reserve. The fittings, construction and equipment quality is up to commercial standards.

The forward cabin has an impressive walkaround queen, ensuite head with enclosed shower, lots of storage, and 6' 8" headroom throughout.

The pilothouse provides great visibility, immediate access to decks port/starboard, the comfort of wind/sun protection, and heat/cooling when needed.

The galley is gourmet with large windows all around, 10' of counter space, dual sinks, stove/oven, microwave and large storage.

The settee provides a dining, relaxation and entertainment space.

Between the cockpit (with sun shade), upper roof deck (with bimini) and bow deck, there is plenty of space to be outside.

And the engine room under the pilot house has hatches on port and starboard providing great working access to both side of the engine, generator, hot water heater, etc. All tanks, batteries and electrical systems are in a separate room under the saloon.

-------------------------------

I can't tell you how many times we traveled with larger boats that could not get into desirable anchorages due to depth, or get slips in older marinas due to length or beam, or get under fixed bridges due to height. For example, you can not go up the Champlain if over 17' and that was a major issue for those many boats trapped at Waterford due to flooding in the Erie Canal last year.
__________________
Larry
American Tug 34 - Great Laker, and Gold Looper
Home port on the vast unsalted Lake Michigan
adventuresofgreatlaker.blogspot.com
Great Laker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2014, 11:12 AM   #58
Member
 
skipperdarrell's Avatar
 
City: Denver, CO
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Why Knot
Vessel Model: 1988 45' Nelson
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 18
Great Loop How Long

Hi there.
We started our Loop in early January of 2012 and crossed our wake in April of 2013, 10 months of that underway. We had some fixed shore leaves we had to take. 5551 miles. A great experience all the way around.

To the skipper that posted saying that writing a blog would be a long-winded blog...yep. It is. It is a long experience.
There are three reasons to write a blog about doing the loop. First, it is your record of the experience for your benefit. It is about what you did and what the impact was on you. Second, it is a way to share your experiences with others. The third is that it is a supplement to you ship's log. On my Excel ship logs I place links to specific blog entries that supplement what my log is showing.

Our blog Why Knot On The Great Loop

I did publish a book about our experience which I am now revising. The sections that I have revised and republished are at Smashwords – Book Search: "darrell grob"

It was a wonderful experience. My wife and I are now coastal cruisers on the East Coast. (Currently sitting in Hampton awaiting our new canvas to be installed.)

In my book, "Our On Board Life", I say that the reason that we finally got out and did the Loop is that we finally ran out of excuses. My suggestion is to figure out what your excuses are (or will be), deal with them in a reasonable manner, and get out there. It will change your life.
__________________
Darrell Grob
darrell.grob@gmail.com
@skipperdarrell
www.theonboardlife.com
skipperdarrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 04:14 PM   #59
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,740
We did the Trent-Severn portion and back to Ct summer of 2012, then we did the Lake Champlain, ST Lawrence R , Rideau canal and back last summer. Each of those years we spent a lot of time in those systems and really enjoyed them. And I enjoyed being back home for the winter.

This summer I am working a contract job thru mid July so we are staying local. We may or may not contiue next summer, if we do we can run thru what we already saw and spend time in the more western areas.

I don't really have that burning desire to complete the loop just so I can say I did it, I'd rather cruise where I feel like at the time.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Attitude Adjustment
40 Albin
Mystic,Ct. /New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2014, 04:27 PM   #60
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by jleonard View Post

I don't really have that burning desire to complete the loop just so I can say I did it, I'd rather cruise where I feel like at the time.
Well, we do want to ultimately do all the loop. Now certain portions we see as only means to get to the next. For instance from Chicago to Cairo, not a lot of excitement on that stretch.

However, for those who don't have time to do the loop I recommend partial loops. Then if the time comes you're doing the rest you can go through the areas you've done quickly. When we loop we'll spend very little time on the coast. We travel it all the time. But we want to enjoy the various rivers and the Great Lakes. As to the boat completing the loop that could take two or three years as we intend to spend time on the TN river and the Ohio and the Cumberland.
__________________

BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012