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Old 10-22-2019, 09:22 PM   #1
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Galley in the bow? Opinions???

So after looking over my boat and not really liking the current layout a ton Iím thinking of moving the galley into tho bow. And keep in mind my boat is going to be completely gutted so moving the galley really isnít going to be any more work for me. Now I do understand that the most movement vertically is in the bow and would limit cooking big proper meals under certain conditions while underway, but for those days Iím sure leftovers and a microwave will work out just fine. At dock or anchor is where we all spend the majority of the time anyway so Iím failing to see the drawbacks. Iím moving into the boat full time when itís done with just my gf and dog and we plan on moving the boat around quite a bit so comfort for us is very much the priority over guests. I just donít see the advantage of keeping a full time spare bedroom and bathroom, when in reality it will become more of a catch all and rarely used for its intended purpose anyway and be a huge wasted space when space is already at a premium. Currently the master bed and bath is in the stern. Iíve thought about deleting the stern bed and bath and setting the boat up more like a true Europa style boat but the vbirth space forward just isnít big enough to fit our bedroom up there in my opinion. Iím thinking doing kind of an open layout galley similar to a tollycraft 44 would really open the whole boat up and make it a really great living space and galley. So opinions on if Iím onto something or barking up the wrong tree? Also would love to hear from some tollycraft 44 owners on how they liked that forward galley. And I do plan on having a true fold out bed in the couch so there will be a spare bed for a guest, they will just have to use the master bathroom.
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Old 10-22-2019, 09:59 PM   #2
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If I am understanding your post correctly, the pics are not of your boat and your galley is ”up” in the saloon. A ”galley down” like in both pics can be a great configuration and increases indoor entertaining space so the host can prep food and drinks in a dedicated space without being completely apart from the guests, but what you are describing sounds like it would be in place of the v berth, this would be awkward in my opinion. Retaining a small stateroom forward even if it is really small works fine for guests as they will spend very little waking hours there so roominess isn't a priority. Do you have a sketch of your current configuration?
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:02 PM   #3
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I say go for it!..certainly not traditional but its your cruising style and life. That guy that built the Diesel Duck look alike in Fl made a great argument for a fwd galley and it looks functional.
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:22 PM   #4
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Due to awkward angles in walls, the needed height and floor area to fit a fridge of your choice could be a challenge, but there would be super depth available for upper cabinets and decent drawer depth at the waste line. Floor space could be a squeeze. Will you gut the head?
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:52 PM   #5
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There is less boat movement in the center. In the bow it is exaggerated. On cruise ships, cabins toward the bow are generally cheaper.
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Old 10-23-2019, 01:16 AM   #6
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Do you travel on the ocean? I don't think you could make coffee in a good chop on a lake. And what does all that movement do to things in the reefer and cupboards. I had a 60' commercial boat with the head all the way forward. It could only be used in calm weather. Otherwise we used a 5 gallon bucket on deck.
You need a range hood or some other venting or the whole boat will smell like the last meal. Easier to do on deck. And the cook will feel like they're living in a cave (or a sailboat).
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Old 10-23-2019, 04:32 AM   #7
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Yes those are not pictures of my boat, they are pictures of what I would like to do for my boat. Iíve already looked into it there is nothing load baring in my dash the way itís setup right now so opening it up should be fairly easy. Galley is pretty standard for a boat as it sits currently Iíll send some pics of it now. Itís just really badly setup in my opinion both taking up an entire wall in the boat while still somehow having no storage or counter space to prepare anything or store food. Both my gf and I do enjoy cooking quite a bit so a nice place to cook is kind of a priority for us. For the last 4 years we have been living in a 38 foot class A diesel rv with no slide outs and itís got a better kitchen setup then the boat does and thatís pretty sad lol. We will be switching from electric to gas stove, and there is already a cutout along the port wall for a pretty big vent that was there for the bathroom. I was thinking of having the fridge facing forward in the center right next to the stairs so I should be able to fit just about any fridge I want in there, and it will be a home unit. Plenty of headroom down there as well, I believe it was something like 6í 11Ē of headroom any place you could stand currently. And yes I would be gutting the forward head as well
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Old 10-23-2019, 04:35 AM   #8
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You have any info or links to the guy that built that diesel duck look alike with the forward head?
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Old 10-23-2019, 08:14 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmarsh203 View Post
...a 38 foot class A diesel rv with no slide outs and itís got a better kitchen setup then the boat does and thatís pretty sad lol
An RV is a rectangular box. Makes it MUCH easier to install regular appliances and cabinets. This would be a BIG factor if you move the galley into a space that's forward of where the sides of the hull start to angle inward.

Before you do this, have you considered buying a different boat that's already set up the way you'd prefer?

I can't imagine a re-fit of something like this is going to be anywhere near cost-effective. You'll end up spending more than a whole other boat and have no hope of ever recouping the expense.
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Old 10-23-2019, 08:26 AM   #10
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What about using the forward most area as storage of some form with the galley right behind it? That solves the wall shape issue for the most part.
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Old 10-23-2019, 09:55 AM   #11
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I think "Healhustler" hit it on the head. There is no floor space in the bow.

Personally I prefer a galley up configuration. The Admiral and I share cooking duties and there is plenty of room. Also we like to snack while reading or playing board games in the evening. These creaky old knees love being able to get to the refrigerator, microwave and sink without having to deal with steps. Also, it is a pain to carry a load of hot, sometimes slippery food (spaghetti, sweet corn, etc) up stairs to the salon. One more point, what about even a simple sandwich lunch or chips and fruit while on the flybridge ? Two flights of steps? Not for me.

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Old 10-23-2019, 10:16 AM   #12
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Greetings,
Mr. Jm. While your plan IS doable, I'm with Mr. rs. Why not make the v-berth area a larder, of sorts. LOTS of storage possibilities. Direct access to the galley for foodstuffs and also all of those extra essentials (spare parts, clothing, linens, tools etc.) needed for living aboard not needed on a daily basis.


I really think since you and the misses enjoy cooking together you will be quite cramped in the forward most part of the boat.
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Old 10-23-2019, 10:48 AM   #13
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The galley area tends to be the center of activity on vessels we've enjoyed the most over the years. This group enjoyment area then requires space. As noted by others galley space is best open, bright, easy to ventilate, higher in the vessel and suitable for stoves, sinks (gravity drains are wonderful) and refrigerators.

We spent some time cruising on a large yacht this past summer where the galley area could seat 8' stand 8 more and still have lots of room to get around. It was the boat's social area in the AM. Delightful.
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Old 10-23-2019, 11:20 AM   #14
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I have a friend who did this with a 40' Defever tri-cabin in connection with a major rehab. The galley-up was moved to the nose and the port side was open to the salon.

The boat was sold about a year ago, so I can't provide specifics other than it seemed to work for them and they liked it.
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Old 10-23-2019, 11:26 AM   #15
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The other consideration is resale value. Some day you are going to want to sell that boat. A really unusual layout -- like galley in the bow -- is going to make that much more difficult. Which means you are either forced to take a lower price, or you are forced to wait it out until you find that one, particular buyer who likes your unusual layout (and, of course, you continue paying carrying costs while you wait).


Of course, if you intend to keep the boat for decades, this may not be a consideration. But then, how many have been forced by circumstances to sell their boat long before they intended to? And if you are forced to sell quickly, then you can't wait for the right buyer, so you have to let it go at a give-away price.


Just something to consider. Good luck, whatever you do.
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Old 10-23-2019, 11:35 AM   #16
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The trend I see now in new boats is galley far aft giving easy access to and from the aft deck for alfresco dining and cocktails.
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Old 10-23-2019, 11:57 AM   #17
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Galley up/down/back... depends on your activities. While the galley up location seems like a nice way to involve everyone... bear in mind it doesn't hide much. A friend with a new boat that has a galley back location (near the aft door) is presented with some challenges for neat-freak tendencies.

A galley down location allows for a messier situation when your entertaining doesn't include the galley as an activity. Especially for recreational day-boating activities. You can leave bags of chips out, boxes of snacks, cutting board for limes, etc. Now, you could of course do the same for a galley-up or back position but the mess is more "in plain view". Some might prefer otherwise.

Me, I like the galley down when the windshield is overhead. I've seen a few boats with the galley now 'half-way down' just a step or two, instead of three/four down onto the cabin level. Sabre does this on their 45+ and it's a nice arrangement... for a recreational-use kind of boat.

The only time I've ever seen a galley forward was for much older/larger motor yachts. Where the galley was NOT expected to be seen or used by the guests.. only crew. They seemed like pretty unpleasant spaces.
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Old 10-23-2019, 12:10 PM   #18
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Hmm all good arguments, the cost factor is not such an issue for me since I will be doing the install myself on everything, so it’s the cost of materials. I work a 28-14 schedule two weeks off at a time coupled with me working pretty quickly and not sleeping much I don’t see it taking all that long to do most of it. And I’m not seeing a need to quick sell the boat if I do decide to get rid of it, i own the boat out right. And I don’t own a home and boating is already considerably cheaper than rv living or home living any place I would consider moving, so the rv is going first if it comes down to it, and it’s already such an unusual boat reselling it will already be a hassle when I do decide to sell it. . Once I rip everything out up forward I will definitely be doing some more measuring, I do want plenty of room to move around for at least one of us and hopefully both of us. The pics I sent and have are pretty bad and it is much larger in there than the pictures seem, also I’m only looking at putting cooking space up forward not dining space like the earlier pictures so it should be fairly open with plenty of storage for food. I would have done a galley stern configuration if I thought I could fit my bed and closets in the vbirth area, but I just don’t see that happening.
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Old 10-23-2019, 12:24 PM   #19
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Wifey B:

Initial thought: You're out of your freaking mind!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Second thought: If it's what you want to do then do it.

Third thought: Maybe somewhere in between. Live and experience some before going too drastic. I wouldn't want a forward galley as we spend a lot of time while underway in our galley. I know you say you don't need the second cabin, but many people find they only rarely do and the rest of the time it sure makes great storage. Storage for any and everything including all your off-season clothes. I really like a galley just aft of the helm as it's so convenient for cruising. It's also convenient to the salon and makes the walk from relaxing to grabbing something to eat or drink a short one. Not too far from the aft deck even.

Maybe even you do all this in phases and get the boat truly livable the fastest way possible and keep the other possibilities in your mind for potential future redecorating.
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Old 10-23-2019, 12:37 PM   #20
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How is the aft stateroom configured? Is there a corridor from the aft deck up to the saloon, do you access the saloon through side doors (I don't see any) or do you walk through the stateroom?
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