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Old 07-15-2015, 10:42 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
I don't care how old the boat is, I survey to ABYC Standards (plus what I've learned over the years). 99% of the buyers I survey for know very little about the systems on the boats they buy and I feel it is my responsibility to inform them of the "best practice" (often ABYC). I do not insist they change anything, I simply inform them of "best practice".

As to the point about gasketed locker lids ..... Yes, propane is heavier than air but not that much and it can easily be moved around a vessel with a little puff of wind hence the ABYC gasket.

and ..... Draining LPG out of the bottom of a locker on a flying bridge could lead to the gas drifting down the helm cable race or into an open window,

Like I said, some surveyor might make an issue out of it.

And of course if you are turning the seat into a propane storage locker after the fact and the boat didn't vome that way from the builder, he/she might have more of a point.
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Old 07-15-2015, 10:44 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
Well, I have got to point out, ABYC standards, unlike USCG requirements are not law. They are voluntary best practice guidelines. There are very few new boats if any that meet all ABYC standards.


As an example, the propane detectors that I have used are mostly worthless. They fail in a year or less and give spurious false positives. I have bypassed them on every boat that I have owned with one.


Does that make me less safe? I don't think so. I do follow the one hose rule, so that there is only one connection to the stove to worry about. My nose is a pretty good detector, although one does have to get down near the sole to use it properly.


The lack of a gasket on a top opening locker is another questionable standard. Sure in a perfect world gasketing that joint makes sense, but propane is heavier than air, right? So why does the locker need to be sealed at the top?


David

Yeah I get all that. But as you can now see, surveyors tend to see things a bit more black and white. And that is all I was pointing out.
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Old 07-16-2015, 01:40 AM   #23
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Provided you get a flame safe stove, you should be ok indoors. Flame goes out, propane/LPG flow stops. The valve near the stove is good to have. We are not required to have an alarm sensor system with the type of stove. A new stove costs about the same as a good sensor system professionally fitted.
Insurers here require the system to be certified by a gas fitter, from bottle to flame.
It is important to get it right. In my experience investigating the cause of an explosion on a gas powered propane equipped boat usually starts with each regarded as potentially culpable.
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