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Old 12-25-2015, 07:45 AM   #141
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"The primary reasons for not choosing two connections were: we didn't expect to ever use a connection in the aft deck area, extra cost and desire to keep the boat simple.'

When costs and lifestyle are considered a hunk of wire installed inside and a deck socket are far easier to live with than an expensive out side power hose , that must be carried as inventory for the time it IS needed.And then lugged on deck to use.

An installed wire takes little internal room , a 50A power hose is probably 3 or 4 cubic ft .of storage.

KISS is a fine concept , a hand held GPS will tell you what is required as well as a 22x22 ship style screen, but EZ lazy living counts too.
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Old 12-25-2015, 02:33 PM   #142
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Wifey B: I like kisses....oh yes....Hershey kisses...my man's kisses....lots and lots of kisses. Not dog or cat kisses....sorry but I know where their lips and tongues have been.

KISS.....a tired overused cliche used by boaters when they want to show disdain for a certain piece or pieces of technology but rest assured not all of it in their lives. It's like they find some convenient cut off line. Maybe it's just get what you're comfy with. But strong adherence to KISS and none of us would be on here communicating and we'd be taking an hour to warm today's leftovers and we'd be doing it all by candle and rowing our boats and....

Just a reminder not one of you wants wholesale KISS. You just want the degree of complexity you need and are comfortable with.
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Old 12-25-2015, 07:40 PM   #143
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Wifey B: I like kisses....oh yes....Hershey kisses...my man's kisses....lots and lots of kisses. Not dog or cat kisses....sorry but I know where their lips and tongues have been.

KISS.....a tired overused cliche used by boaters when they want to show disdain for a certain piece or pieces of technology but rest assured not all of it in their lives. It's like they find some convenient cut off line. Maybe it's just get what you're comfy with. But strong adherence to KISS and none of us would be on here communicating and we'd be taking an hour to warm today's leftovers and we'd be doing it all by candle and rowing our boats and....

Just a reminder not one of you wants wholesale KISS. You just want the degree of complexity you need and are comfortable with.
Correctorama... Wifie!

Every person enjoys/appreciates different heights and styles of KISS... on evrrrry "kiss" level. Yummy, Yum!!!

BTW - As technology expands so does the scope of KISS
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Old 12-25-2015, 11:57 PM   #144
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Correctorama... Wifie!

Every person enjoys/appreciates different heights and styles of KISS... on evrrrry "kiss" level. Yummy, Yum!!!

BTW - As technology expands so does the scope of KISS
I think of some of the most basic items on cars today. You don't find a new car without A/C and Heat, but you did in the 70's or so. Who has hand cranks for their windows now? And anyone want to buy without power steering and power brakes. Or adjustable seats? Or inside hood and trunk release? Outside mirrors controlled from the inside? Radio? CD Player? Charging ports? Now, today there are things offered that I find enjoyable only the first day you have the car. Still I can't imagine a trip without GPS today and it will be standard before long. At one time if you intended to turn, you held your arm out the window.

Now I've not lived without any of the items I mentioned above. My first car was my parents' two or three year old Chrysler Lebaron they gave me when I turned 16. Air bags. My 1990 Lebaron had air bags. My wife had never owned a car without them. And toss in Catalytic Converter. I've never owned a car without it. Perhaps as a child I was in one.
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:49 AM   #145
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BB - A cherished life you have lived. There are approx. 6 billion humans on this planet who do not have that gift. In U.S. there are many, many millions who also do not. Enjoy your luck of being placed in life such as you have. I do for mine! Most of the several hundred TF members who contribute have really good lives with much enjoyment available... we all are Very Lucky people.
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:56 AM   #146
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BB - A cherished life you have lived. There are approx. 6 billion humans on this planet who do not have that gift. In U.S. there are many, many millions who also do not. Enjoy your luck of being placed in life such as you have. I do for mine! Most of the several hundred TF members who contribute have really good lives with much enjoyment available... we all are Very Lucky people.
Well said Art.
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Old 12-26-2015, 12:51 PM   #147
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BB - A cherished life you have lived. There are approx. 6 billion humans on this planet who do not have that gift. In U.S. there are many, many millions who also do not. Enjoy your luck of being placed in life such as you have. I do for mine! Most of the several hundred TF members who contribute have really good lives with much enjoyment available... we all are Very Lucky people.
By the very fact those of us here have boats, we're among the lucky. And I do call it luck and good fortune. It's definitely not because we're better or more deserving.

One thing I've always tried to do is understand the lives of others, of that sewing operator making sheets or that single mom working retail for us. We do stay in touch with those less fortunate than us, whether it's a trip to the homeless shelter or an orphanage or to a soup kitchen. They need us all thinking of them and speaking up on their behalf.

We all talk about boats and cruising and to the vast majority of people it's all a very foreign concept. I admit to feeling guilty sometimes over all we have. People say we earned it but there are a lot of others who work harder than I ever did so why didn't they earn it? We also have an extended family and friends. There are a lot of people struggling through life alone. Many more who are with others but still lonely. I think how easily that could have been me.

Very lucky. And the day any of us forget that, we've fallen.
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Old 12-26-2015, 02:10 PM   #148
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Water Drainage

Until you have spent time aboard in poor weather with seas washing across the deck or have lived aboard thru a raining season, you may not recognize the significance proper water drainage has on your boat. Over time you will come to realize how even the slightest design imperfection may become a real headache. While our previous boats were very well thought out allowing for sea, rain and rinse water to find its way overboard, there were still a few areas which drove me a little crazy. One particular drain path on our N40's allowed water to drain from behind the flybridge down into the side of the Portuguese Bridge landing on the steps. More then once I felt the uncomfortable feeling of cold water hitting the back of my neck during the rain or when washing the boat. Granted this was more of a nuisance then true a safety issue but it does make you appreciate the fact the rest of the boat had excellent drainage.

Other areas of drainage that are significantly more important include the anchor / anchor chain area and all deck areas. Anyone who has retrieved an anchor covered with mud will appreciate proper drainage overboard as you rinse everything down. All deck areas should be designed with molded drain paths along their edges to allow the exit of water without running across the decks themselves.

Large scuppers strategically place are equally important and a must have on most boats. We prefer scuppers with some type of cover or flap to help resist water from entering the boat underway while allowing for unrestricted water drainage overboard. The height of their installation above the boats waterline is also something to take a close look at.

While we have no experience with the Helmsman 38PH in this area we have been assured by Scott that he has enhanced the design over time to address these issues and believes current models will not have any issues. Living in PNW I trust Scott has this design aspect of the boat well thought out.

John T.
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Old 12-29-2015, 01:54 PM   #149
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Engine Selection

Identifying and selecting an engine that best matches the boats hull form and desired performance is not a decision that should be taken lightly and requires research if you plan to deviate from the builders recommendation. I found this most challenging when exploring a custom built Downeast boat where the range of potential engine types, manufactures and size were overwhelming. Even within the relatively narrow field of semi-displacement trawlers options remain, but they are manageable. Our experience with diesel engine manufacturers was limited to Lugger and Yanmare, this required me to spend time researching information on-line and speaking with owners of similar size / type boats to help us make an educated decision. I quickly realized that Lugger was likely not the best fit for our planned use and did not want another Yanmare so I was entering unchartered waters.
While I have great respect for majority of trawler builders we researched, I was disappointed by many “production” builders who resisted any proposed changes to their standard engine selection. We felt those builders were a little more focused on risk and cost avoidance then exploring what could be an improvement to their existing selection.
So as you can imagine we found it very refreshing to hear Scott at Waterline Boats would accommodate just about any engine a buyer selected. We spoke with previous and current owners of the 38PH including a previous Nordhavn owner who selected a Lugger for his 38PH which we found interesting. What we discovered was that most owners liked the standard Cummins engine and reported very few issues. I was a little apprehensive at first but after two sea trials on two different boats with the Cummins engine I came to appreciate the response, noise levels, digital display and smooth controls. The amount of information provided on the small display located on the console was significantly greater then I had been accustomed on previous boats. Since our planned cruising speeds of 7 – 9 knots are only slightly above displacement hull speed (6 knots) we originally planned to stay with the standard 220hp engine but then upgraded to the larger 380HP (same block) after realizing the few extra knots at top end (13 knots) would be welcome if we found ourselves fighting currents in the PNW or east coast. Another factor which played into our decision was resale. We recognize the majority of folks who buy semi-displacement boats have limited time aboard and many want the higher speeds to make the most of their weekends so we felt the larger engine would provide a larger resale market.
We are pleased with our final decision and look forward to providing an update after we take delivery and spent some time cruising the coast. It will be interesting to see how much we use the higher end speed during a normal 8-10 hour cruise. Next time we will take a look at Trim-Tabs and our decision process.

John
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Old 12-29-2015, 02:06 PM   #150
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. It will be interesting to see how much we use the higher end speed during a normal 8-10 hour cruise.
John
I think you'll find it's not the frequency with which you'll use greater speed, it's the appreciation of that ability when you do need or want it. Sea or current conditions can lead to it's use. The other thing that leads to many of us speeding up is the desire to reach our destination before dark or the desire to hit an inlet or other area at the most favorable tide. Even the occasional hurry to not miss a bridge or lock opening.
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Old 12-30-2015, 12:06 PM   #151
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I think you'll find it's not the frequency with which you'll use greater speed, it's the appreciation of that ability when you do need or want it. Sea or current conditions can lead to it's use. The other thing that leads to many of us speeding up is the desire to reach our destination before dark or the desire to hit an inlet or other area at the most favorable tide. Even the occasional hurry to not miss a bridge or lock opening.
Perfectly said, thanks.

John
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Old 12-30-2015, 05:23 PM   #152
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Week 7 - Progress Report

Work continued with installation of the transverse stringers (many more of these smaller stringers or ribs compared with the longer forward / aft stringers). I'm not sure if the yard is closed any days this time of the year but I would not be surprised if progress slowed a little the past week. Looking forward to seeing the bulkheads installed then removal from the hull molds (we will start to post pictures then). Thanks

John


I will soon post our decision whether to place this boat in an LLC and the reasons why we have done so with our last three trawlers.
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Old 01-06-2016, 08:46 PM   #153
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Week 8 Progress Report & Photo

Just when we thought things may have slowed down at the factory over the holidays we received new photo's from Scott. I attached one showing the completion of stringers and the bulkheads being installed. At this point I believe we are on or close to being on schedule. Its hard to be precise without a milestone schedule from the builder (something Scott and I working with the yard to provide) but based on past experience with the Nordies we look good. It is also important to note the projected build schedule for this boat is 6-7 months for a 38' compared to 12 months for a 40' Nordie. Granted the displacements are 20K apart but the build process is similar thus I feel good with our progress.

John
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Old 01-14-2016, 08:38 PM   #154
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Interior Design

Just a quick update to advise we received the set of drawings depicting our redesigned galley and salon. I have to give the yard credit, they were able to take our design (using Excel) and came up with a near perfect copy including precise dimensions. We are very close and just need to make a few tweaks building a separate entertainment cabinet where we were planning to hide a washer / dryer.

I also plan to discuss our electronics selection with a potential installer at the show and try to finalize our selection. We learned that Furuno no longer offers the Navnet display we have come to like and would need to go with the advanced touch screen models. I'm not a big fan of touch screens on a boat or car so I'm looking at their model that offers both, old fashion knobs and touch screen together. My concern with touch screens is how quickly they can get full of finger prints and trying to use one in rough sea's would likely prove troublesome.

That's about it for this week. Hope to see some TF readers on Friday at the show.
John T.
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Old 01-14-2016, 08:45 PM   #155
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John: Are you going over to the yard for a looksee?
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Old 01-15-2016, 01:20 AM   #156
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John-glad to hear that someone has the same reservations about touch screens as I do. I do not like the touch screen on on my laptop or on my iPad. Much prefer a touch pad or mouse. Finger prints and imprecise maneuvering on the screen are annoying. I have a hard enough time with it on a laptop sitting still on my desk, much less having to lean forward, reach over the wheel to the mounted screens to try to hit a moving target with my finger. And the just as I get my finger in the right spot, a wave hits, my finger screams across the screen and I am suddenly watching Mad Max on the screen. I still like knobs and dials, although we do use a remote touchpad as well.
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Old 01-15-2016, 01:33 PM   #157
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Electronics

John;
Don't know if this helps but I put Simrad on my PH38 and really like it. Even though I'm a huge fan of computers and phones with touch screens I'm finding that I still use the buttons and knobs on my Simrad. The nice thing with the Simrad is that it has both. Additionally the Simrad Autopilot shows you your rudder position at all times which is a nice feature especially for me who is far from Pro status!
Jamie
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Old 01-16-2016, 03:30 PM   #158
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Yard Visit

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John: Are you going over to the yard for a looksee?
Larry, at this Tim we are not planning a visit. The only thing that would change this position would be if we run into any serious schedule or design issues.
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Old 01-23-2016, 12:02 PM   #159
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weekly update

Last weeks progress was a little less then I was expecting based on the photos provided by Scott. The reported reasoning was a heavy work load on the boat ahead of us which if you worked in any type of manufacturing environment you can understand. These types of delays are not that unusual especially with a smaller yard and limited work staff. I'm still amazed how quickly and efficient this yard is to build a high quality and heavy 38' in about six months.

I'm looking forward to flying up to Seattle on Friday for the show. I plan to be at the Helmsman line-up of three boats so if anyone is in the area please stop by and say hello.
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Old 01-24-2016, 11:19 AM   #160
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I'll plan to be there as well on Friday.
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