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Old 03-11-2016, 09:21 PM   #321
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It is exciting/absorbing watching one's boat being created. Enjoy!

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Old 03-12-2016, 12:47 PM   #322
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Day Head - A Nice Surprise

Just when you think you have a good grasp on all the standard equipment that comes with a boat you get a surprise. In this specific case I received a pleasant surprise when discussing the second day head off the salon. We were talking about the feasibility of adding a small engine access panel to the starboard side wall when Scott mentioned the day head also includes a shower thus concern of water leakage. I responded by saying "shower" what shower. Scott went on to explain the one piece molded compartment is designed with a drain and hand held shower nozzle built into the sink. This provides for a very clean look I thought and great idea. I thought the shower would be an option and didn't the see the need for it, but now thinking this does add functionality to the boat in case we ever had a guest spend the night in the salon. A nice surprise which didn't require us to spend more money.

John
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Old 03-12-2016, 01:08 PM   #323
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John - I'm so pleased to see/hear your new-boat coming along so well. I follow every post!


In 1970 when I worked for Maine Coast Ship builders (building FRP and full-on wood boats - 27' to 40' FRP - up to 65' wood)... the truly amazing boat-building items were learning from master shipwrights while they constructed good ol' woodies. FRP was on a production line and not too interesting. Wooden boat building is interesting!


Not that I'm saying anything bad about FRP boat construction. IMO well constructed and planned out FRP by far and away out places wood as a great material to build boats from. But - wood-boat building in very interesting... as well as time consuming.
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Old 03-12-2016, 01:15 PM   #324
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I thought the shower would be an option and didn't the see the need for it, but now thinking this does add functionality to the boat in case we ever had a guest spend the night in the salon. A nice surprise which didn't require us to spend more money.

John
Wifey B: That's cool. We've been known to have people sleep in the salon.
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Old 03-12-2016, 04:53 PM   #325
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Art-not to hijack John's fascinating thread, but my first wife's uncle built shrimpboats, 80-85', in Holden Beach, NC for over 50 years, through the early 1980's. I used to go down and watch those guys and it would just amaze me. No plans, they just laid down a keel and started building. To this day I can recall watching an old craftsman planing hull planks by hand. He would lay the plan on horses next to where it would go, eyeball the angles and the turn of the hull from the bow, take the plane and plane a sifting bevel on the edges and then put it in place. And damned if it did not fit almost perfectly the first try. A lost art now.

Back to John's new Helmsman. Like Art, I really am enjoing John's experience with this new boat!
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Old 03-12-2016, 11:10 PM   #326
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Wood Boats

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Art-not to hijack John's fascinating thread, but my first wife's uncle built shrimpboats, 80-85', in Holden Beach, NC for over 50 years, through the early 1980's. I used to go down and watch those guys and it would just amaze me. No plans, they just laid down a keel and started building. To this day I can recall watching an old craftsman planing hull planks by hand. He would lay the plan on horses next to where it would go, eyeball the angles and the turn of the hull from the bow, take the plane and plane a sifting bevel on the edges and then put it in place. And damned if it did not fit almost perfectly the first try. A lost art now.

Back to John's new Helmsman. Like Art, I really am enjoing John's experience with this new boat!
No worries talking about other boats especially hand crafted wooden boats. To be honest I still have "attending a wooden boat building school in Main on my bucket list". As is mentioned early on, I appreciate most all styles and types of boats. I'm a big fan of the art and craftsmanship that goes into boat building and hope the remaining few remain in business and pass on their talents to the next generation.

John
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Old 03-12-2016, 11:36 PM   #327
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Today was a good day

A few readers may recall the title of this post, it is a phrase I have used in other posts prior as I closed out a story or event. The reason for the phase is to remind myself just how important every day is and to try find something special with each and every day. While some days may be harder then others to identify that one special moment worth remembering I do try. Funny thing is that identifying what made a good day was easier when we spent time aboard. It usually was something as simple as sitting out on the aft deck with Maria and Daisy sipping on a Margarita, listening to music, watching the boats sail by before the sun set. Life doesn't get much better than this.

When you add in the rough patch we went through a few years ago any day with good health is a good day but how quickly we can forget how important ones health is and start to take it for granted. Not good!

Today we drove Mary's new car to San Diego (100 miles each way) for a day by the water. We stopped in at Sunroad Marina and spoke with the new manager about a slip for the new boat. The office assistant remembered us from the last two boats and asked about N4061 which recently departed to Mexico. Despite being at 90%+ capacity the manager told us not to worry, we will have a slip when the boat arrives. Even if its not our favorite slip he will take care of us and move a boat if he needs too. I guess having a few Nordhavn's followed with another new trawler carries a little weight when it comes to finding a slip.

After walking around the marina and talking about old times we picked up a few sandwiches and had lunch on the bay. We visited the old church in Point Loma we attended when we were in SD and listened to a tour guide who just happened to be talking about the history of the church. Built in 1933 and funded mostly by Portuguese fisherman the church became a beacon of light for them and other boaters in the early years. Pretty interesting I thought.

After a few hours enjoying the cool weather and sunshine we returned home, dropped off Daisy and went out for dinner and couple of margaritas before returning home and watching the X-Factor UK finals (we like music) which Mary recorded from the original showing.

Today was a good day!

John
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Old 03-12-2016, 11:54 PM   #328
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We like music, too! We're Voice fans.

Sounds like a great day!

I seem to remember a privacy curtain in the salon that gives guests visual privacy on the port side while still retaining unencumbered access to the day head. It seemed like a great setup for a single stateroom vessel with occasional overnight guests.
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Old 03-13-2016, 03:40 PM   #329
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Bow Railings

While bow railings play an important safety role on any boat they can also influence the boats appearance. I don't need to go into specifics on just how important they are since everyone on TF has likely had at least once experience where a railing kept them from falling overboard. One observation I had about the H38PH was the height and length of the bow railings. While the height was actually perfect for safety I felt they caused the forward deck to look a little short or stubby.

Realizing this was not something we could do much to change I was determined to come up with something. At first I suggested we reduce the railing height by about 6 inches and lengthen the railings past the anchor. My thought was it would provide a sleeker look (sleeker equaling longer) for the forward deck while also allowing for the operator to step out and over the anchor without bending outward and over, a nice safety touch when retrieving the anchor. Keeping safety as a priority Scott pushed back on lower the railing (but would accommodate us on a one off modification) while being on the fence with the extension. I agreed safety is more important then appearance and to leave the height as designed but to extend the railing over the anchor for both safety and appearance (a nice win/win). Needless to say I was pleasantly surprised when Scott advised a few weeks later he was going to make the bow railing extension over the anchor standard on all new boats starting with ours. I believe the combination of the new PH roof line combined with the extended railings will greatly enhance the appearance of the boat providing a slightly sleeker / longer look up front. This is just another example of how Scott works with customers, always will to listen, discuss the pro's & con's and accommodate owners.

Another relative simple / low cost enhancement which future buyers will likely never notice was incorporated but will appreciate when launching / retrieving the anchor.

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Old 03-13-2016, 05:12 PM   #330
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We made a rail decision at the risk of appearance as well. Actually the builder did computer mock ups and then did some with real rails, just not installed. We wanted 6 more inches and as it turned out it's exactly what the next larger boat in the line had. In our minds, safety always trumps appearance.
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Old 03-13-2016, 06:37 PM   #331
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Good decision on rail height. Building standards specify railing height, if railings are too low they cease to function as safety rails and become a trip device which will actually send you over if you come against them while upright, due to more body weight above rail height than below it.
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Old 03-13-2016, 09:23 PM   #332
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Teak Interior

While we have explored different areas an aspects of the boat we managed to skip over the teak interior and "value" this boat offers. I fell in love with teak interiors over 30 years ago while boarding a GB Aft cabin model during a boat show. Wow, I thought to myself, some day I will own such a boat. To this day I remain passionate about teak inside a boat for all the same reasons many other boaters feel.

Fast forward to the H38EPH and I cannot say enough about craftsmanship, fit & finish of all the woodwork. It is the best I have found on any boat including many that cost 5X more.

Understanding teak is a depleting natural resource and some well known trawler builders are now starting to make it an option (cherry and other woods becoming the standard) we are grateful we can build one more boat with teak and not have to pay a premium.

As much as we both love the warmth teak brings Mary understands the need to keep things bright and airy inside so she will work her magic with the soft goods to fins that special blend.

We still need to discuss the Pilothouse and will address this important room next week.

John
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Old 03-15-2016, 10:51 PM   #333
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Slightly off subject

I'm not exactly sure how to interpret the number of views (20,000) reported on our blog (is this correct term?) but I will say that is a big number and way more than we ever dreamed. Hopefully those who are following our journey have picked up a thing or two along the way that will assist them with their future new build.

Today we selected a personalized license plate for Mary's new Honda. Staying with the nautical theme she selected "2 at Sea". This should compliment her other new car (MBZ SL 400) license plate "Yacht SD". For those wondering what the heck does this have to do with building a boat all I can say is that it is a "California thing" to link ones car to ones hobby or interest and spend money on personalized plates. This being said she is a southern California girl and normally gets what she wants. It should also be noted that she lets me build boats which cost a little more so who am I to judge? Life is just too dang short and unpredictable not to enjoy it and have a little fun.

That's all for today. Tomorrow I have a teleconference with the builders of the Whitehall rowing boats to discuss the possibility of turning one of these beautiful boats into a tender. Its a long shot but worth exploring.

John
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Old 03-16-2016, 08:29 PM   #334
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Storage on deck

I don't think anyone will argue that you cannot ave enough storage on a boat. One area that had me a little concerned on this boat was aft deck and where we would store all the lines and fenders? After an in depth review of the 38 during the Seattle Boat Show I was able to convince myself that a clean and unobstructed aft deck (no storage boxes) was worth using the lazerret for storage. Even for a semi displacement hull the lazeret provides more than enough storage. Another pleasant surprise was a huge locker just starboard of the anchor locker large enough to hold a few more fenders. Overall I believe the boat offers plenty of exterior storage.

OK, back to Mary and Daisy as we enjoy a margarita some music while enjoying the weather after a days work.

Today was a good day!😃
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Old 03-18-2016, 12:57 PM   #335
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Windows

While most people likely want stress on window construction and type it is something we take serious and for good reason. Any boat you plan to use year round and in open ocean cannot afford to have water leakage, breakage or corrosion issues. While we overall positive experiences with our other boats we did experience one small leak and significant corrosion issues with another. I repaired the leak myself and had to have Nordhavn step up and take care of the corrosion issues. I wasn't alone and the yard actually flew in crew to California to work on many new boats. A recent informative post on the Nordavn owners site revealed the corrosion is alive and well on aluminium framed windows and doors. We have not heard of an issues with any Helmsman boats and optimistic things will be fine.

Besides reducing the salon windows 15% we also ordered them pre-tinted medium so we don't have to deal with this post commissioning. We prefer tinted windows for the privacy and to help keep the salon cooler on sunny days. We also think the contrast between the black windows and white boat adds a nice touch to look of the boat.

Another consideration we stress over is the balance between opening and non-opening windows (mostly due to the potential leakage issue). On this post we decided to stay with the standard mix.

John
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Old 03-18-2016, 06:47 PM   #336
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[QUOTE=N4061;425054]While most people likely want stress on window construction and type it is something we take serious and for good reason. Any boat you plan to use year round and in open ocean cannot afford to have water leakage, breakage or corrosion issues.

Sorry for all the gramer errors, first using an i-pad.

John
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Old 03-19-2016, 11:46 AM   #337
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Progress Report

Scott provided a batch of photo's this week showing the process and progress of the all new deck mold. We can see in these two photos the gel coat (red) has been applied to the mold (was blue) and getting ready for the fiberglass layups and eventually an all new deck & deck house. To be honest when we started this journey I didn't realize our boat would be the first with the entirely all new deck house. I thought we would only be re-tooling for the PH but I'm glade to see Scott making the investment in completely new mold to include all the other enhancements for the new H38E. Building an entirely new mold is not cheap and shows his commitment to building a quality boat and "doing things right".

There's not very much more work that can be accomplished inside the hull until the new deck is attached providing the required structural reinforcement. So far so good.....

John
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Old 03-20-2016, 02:07 PM   #338
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Trip Planning

While we know first hand how life's uncertainties can derail even the best planning this doesn't stop us from doing a little dreaming and thinking ahead. Over dinner last night we were discussing the boat and where we would like to take her this summer. Since we are still locked into weekends and a few week long trips, our options will be limited to southern California. We can go as far south as Ensenada, Mexico or north to Santa Barbara for the next few years unless we decide to leave the boat at a different port and fly home.

Last week while discussing our return to Sunroad Marina the manager mentioned he was planning four day trip to Ensenada and asked if we would be interested to joining the small group. We hesitated to commit since the boat is not even built year and I'm one who likes to break in a boat slowly by staying close to home port for the first 50 hours of engine run time. All this being said Mary and I agreed that if timing works out and the boat is fully commissioned we would make this 10 hour run down the coast as part of breaking in the boat. While we normally do not travel with other boaters knowing we will be with others this time provides a nice "safety net". For anyone who has not headed north along the Mexico & southern California coast it can be a little uncomfortable due to the head seas you will likely face for hours and days on end. Our last trip up from Ensenada was in 4' - 5' swells(not bad) very close together (bad) providing a very unpleasant 10-12 hour run. With the occasional 7' swells we buried the bow of the N40 (taller boat) more than a few times which was a mix of fun, excitement and concern all in one. I don't want to do this in a new boat that has not been broken in so we will have to see where we are with everything before we make the final decision. Safety fist.

Ensenada is great place to visit for a long weekend to enjoy great food, drinks, the wineries up in the hills and just very pleasant people. There are two primary places to stay; Hotel Coral is a first class hotel marina that makes you feel far away from everything and Cruiseport Marina in the center of town where the cruise boats visit. Walking distance to town and very clean / safe. If you ever have the opportunity to visit Ensenada it is worth a stop over.

John
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Old 03-20-2016, 03:40 PM   #339
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Wifey B: We loved Ensenada. It served as a great introduction to Mexico.
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Old 03-20-2016, 09:49 PM   #340
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N4061 View Post
While we know first hand how life's uncertainties can derail even the best planning this doesn't stop us from doing a little dreaming and thinking ahead. Over dinner last night we were discussing the boat and where we would like to take her this summer. Since we are still locked into weekends and a few week long trips, our options will be limited to southern California. We can go as far south as Ensenada, Mexico or north to Santa Barbara for the next few years unless we decide to leave the boat at a different port and fly home.

Last week while discussing our return to Sunroad Marina the manager mentioned he was planning four day trip to Ensenada and asked if we would be interested to joining the small group. We hesitated to commit since the boat is not even built year and I'm one who likes to break in a boat slowly by staying close to home port for the first 50 hours of engine run time. All this being said Mary and I agreed that if timing works out and the boat is fully commissioned we would make this 10 hour run down the coast as part of breaking in the boat. While we normally do not travel with other boaters knowing we will be with others this time provides a nice "safety net". For anyone who has not headed north along the Mexico & southern California coast it can be a little uncomfortable due to the head seas you will likely face for hours and days on end. Our last trip up from Ensenada was in 4' - 5' swells(not bad) very close together (bad) providing a very unpleasant 10-12 hour run. With the occasional 7' swells we buried the bow of the N40 (taller boat) more than a few times which was a mix of fun, excitement and concern all in one. I don't want to do this in a new boat that has not been broken in so we will have to see where we are with everything before we make the final decision. Safety fist.

Ensenada is great place to visit for a long weekend to enjoy great food, drinks, the wineries up in the hills and just very pleasant people. There are two primary places to stay; Hotel Coral is a first class hotel marina that makes you feel far away from everything and Cruiseport Marina in the center of town where the cruise boats visit. Walking distance to town and very clean / safe. If you ever have the opportunity to visit Ensenada it is worth a stop over.

John
Hi John

With safety first as one of your prime concerns... and thoughts of traveling in potentially treacherous waters, have you and the manufacturer delved into extra strong superstructure windows? Wave conditions in area of your above post I bolded could become considerably worse if weather really acts up.

1970, in 37' raised deck sport fisher... My family ran into unexpected fall season weather turbulence with resulting dangerous waves in NE Atlantic. Suffice it to say dad there after built bolt on window overlays of thick Plexiglas. That day will always be remembered - with thanks, to you know who - of being left alive!
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