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Old 08-10-2015, 06:23 PM   #1
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I recently had the misfortune of running my 34' Californian up on the beach. No hull damage, but damaged both props, struts, shafts and rudders. I am working with my insurance.

Would like to get a rough idea of cost. Any one had to replace the things I mentioned above?
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Old 08-10-2015, 06:28 PM   #2
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Don't suppose you would want to share with us how you managed to do that? Might be some useful information to have. Not that we would be joyful at profiting from your experience, of course, but there may be some helpful information. (Cannot help any with cost estimates, alas).
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Old 08-10-2015, 06:29 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Stu-L View Post
I recently had the misfortune of running my 34' Californian up on the beach. No hull damage, but damaged both props, struts, shafts and rudders. I am working with my insurance.

Would like to get a rough idea of cost. Any one had to replace the things I mentioned above?
I replaced 2 shafts, 1 prop, both rudders.....was about $7500. That included new cutlass bearing and shaft seals as well as spare shaft seals. Your props should be repairable at less that $500 per.
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Old 08-10-2015, 07:07 PM   #4
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I just replaced two 22x20 props at $1300 a piece pluss tax. 1.5" Shafts will likely be $1400. do not know rudder or strut prices.

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Old 08-11-2015, 12:36 AM   #5
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Props and shafts can be straightened if the damage is not too bad.

I tweaked a prop, shaft and strut. Replaced 1 shaft, 2 struts (with cutlass bearings) to keep them matched and tuned both props to keep them matched. Bottom damage from obstruction required new bottom paint. Rudder log leaked and required repair. Prop shaft log required replacement. Cost to insurance was $8000...give or take.

I highly recommend Prop Scan of you're tuning your props.
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Old 08-11-2015, 12:42 AM   #6
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Ugh. That's bad. Have run aground several times with my dad's and my sailboats, but the keels protected shafts and propellers, and no damage. One reason I've stayed with a keel protecting single propeller and rudder.
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Old 08-11-2015, 12:44 AM   #7
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I am waiting for my turn. There are those who have run aground and those who will in the future!
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Old 08-11-2015, 02:03 PM   #8
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I recently had the misfortune of running my 34' Californian up on the beach. No hull damage, but damaged both props, struts, shafts and rudders. I am working with my insurance.

Would like to get a rough idea of cost. Any one had to replace the things I mentioned above?
Was this just south of the jetty at Channel Islands Harbor?
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Old 08-11-2015, 02:11 PM   #9
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Ugh. That's bad. Have run aground several times with my dad's and my sailboats, but the keels protected shafts and propellers, and no damage. One reason I've stayed with a keel protecting single propeller and rudder.
Yup, we narrowed down our purchase decision to the Selene we have (single screw) and one with twin engines. That was one of the large deciding factors, the protection the keel afforded the single screw.
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Old 08-11-2015, 04:33 PM   #10
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That was one of the large deciding factors, the protection the keel afforded the single screw.
I suspect it depends on where one boats as to the vulnerability. While there is no question a prop deeper in the water and behind a keel is somewhat more protected than a pair of props closer to the surface and behind a pair of V-struts, it's rather ironic that we know more boaters (power and sail) who have fouled props or damaged props in single engine boats than we know who have done this in twins. The single engine boats range from Tollycraft 26s to a 60 foot ketch.

My own opinion is that some of this--- maybe a lot of this--- is due to the fact, that in our experience and observation, most drivers of multi-engine boats seem to be well aware of their running gear's vulnerability and so pay closer attention to what's in front of them than the drivers of single engine boats (again, power and sail).

We have had several single-engine boat owners say to us that they have nothing to worry about with regards to the crab pot floats, logs, branches, and other debris in the water here because their prop is protected behind their keel.

I don't deny the additional protection, but if the attitude is "damn the debris, full speed ahead" it can lead to problems. While just a single data point, it's significant (in my opinion) that one of the most vocal proponents of his single propeller's invulnerability is one of the aforementioned folks who subsequently wiped out a prop on a piece of debris in the water.

While we would never own a single engine cruising boat ourselves for several reasons, were we making a choice between a single and a multi-engine boat, prop vulnerability would not be part of the decision-making process. We have run a multi-engine boat for seventeen years in waters that have a deserved reputation for having a lot of "stuff" in them and have only had a close-encounter of the debris kind once, when a rudder snagged a submerged length of drifting line.

These 17 years, plus the experience of a lot of other multi-engine boat owners we know who have a lot more experience up here than we do, tells us that while a single may be less vulnerable by design, in reality, it's pretty much six of one, half dozen of the other when it comes to running gear damage.

This may not be the case in other boating regions.

We keep a sharp lookout for stuff in the water, and since we removed the autopilot from this particular boat when we bought it, someone is hand steering all the time. This tends to keep one's attention focused on where one is going. Not that one can't do exactly the same with an autopilot, but the autobox does make it easier to allow one's attention to wander away from the water in front of the boat.
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Old 08-11-2015, 04:59 PM   #11
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We have a friend that is a marine machinist recently retired. He made a living repairing damaged twins and there are many more single screw boats here.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:04 PM   #12
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We have a friend that is a marine machinist recently retired. He made a living repairing damaged twins and there are many more single screw boats here.
Agree...in places like the Atlantic ICW and the NJ ICW...twins often scream aground in the marked channel as sandbars could care less about where the USCG placed the marks last years.

The classic argument holds... both singles and twins have strengths and weaknesses...

Some twins are better protected from grounding than others though...know thy damage draft....

Single skippers with a half a brain know they can foul things or hit things just like twins and incur damage....sliding up on a sandbar or over a sunken log isn't usually one..but many things can be an issue.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:06 PM   #13
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There are far more twin screw boats on the East coast. However, we have very little rock bottom in the Southeast, and mud and sand are pretty forgiving.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:33 PM   #14
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In this area, based on anecdotes told to us and what we hear on the radio, groundings are fairly rare in terms of a boat cruising along and hitting the bottom, which I gather is a fairly common occurrence long the east coast. The water here is much deeper--- 1,000 feet plus is not an uncommon depth sounder reading on the inside waters--- so the problems tend to be from breakdowns, running out of fuel, and hitting things floating in the water.

Boats go ashore here on the rocks after breaking down, running out of fuel, or losing their means of propulsion for some other reason and the current carries them where it will. But simply running out of water while underway does not seem to be very common other than in a few places like river and harbor entrances and other places where there are mud bars adjacent to boating channels.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:57 PM   #15
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I shouldn't admit this, but I've run aground three times in the three years we've had our boat and learned something new each time.

- The first time was in a private channel at a marina south of Daytona. I was technically between the markers but I entered the channel at an angle and favored the starboard side because of a strong wind. In what looked to be a perfectly acceptable position I slowed to a nice easy stop. Took about a half hour for the wind and rising tide to push me off. Lesson learned ... enter channels at right angles and stay in the center.

- The second event was coming south from Jekyll Island. I paid more attention to my plotter than the markers that were right in front of me and became confused and went on the wrong side of a marker. As silly as it sounds now, I think I was actually trying to make the channel markers in the river match what I was seeing on my screen. Again, I came to a nice slow stop. My wife actually laughed at me, I had been telling her all morning to watch the markers and not the plotter.

This time the wind was pushing me into shallow water and the tide was falling. Called Towboat US and they had me off in about an hour. The towboat captain told me not to be too embarrassed and that it was his "honey hole". Lessons learned ... If I'm confused about anything stop until I'm not confused; and navigate using the markers first, not the chart plotter.

- The third time, (and hopefully last), I was coming out of Tween Waters Marina at Sanibel Island and there is one choke point where the channel is very narrow and then opens up into a much larger area of relatively deeper water. I've been in and out of this channel multiple times and I guess I took it for granted that I knew it well. It was a beautiful morning and I was on the flybridge where I don't have any navigation equipment. When I passed the narrow point I turned a little to soon and again, ran slowly aground. This time I dropped the dinghy in and pulled my self back into deeper water. Lesson learned ... don't get cocky and assume I know where I'm at, always be sure.

Three groundings and luckily no damage. For me, the single engine with protected running gear has been a blessing. I can only imagine what might have happened if I didn't have a forgiving boat.

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Old 08-11-2015, 06:22 PM   #16
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I think we found an honest man!
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Old 08-11-2015, 06:26 PM   #17
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I think we found an honest man!
Yep, and it shows the value of prop protection and soft bottoms. I have always been partial to soft bottoms. Oops! Did I say that?
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Old 08-11-2015, 06:34 PM   #18
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My goal is to transit the ICW from Stuart FL to Westport CT or the reverse without touching bottom. This year I made it all the way from Stuart to Cape May NJ without touching bottom. Then my sounder quit exiting the Cape May Canal and I touched bottom. Damn! Almost made it all the way. Sh*#t. Well, maybe this year.

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Old 08-11-2015, 06:35 PM   #19
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Yep, and it shows the value of prop protection and soft bottoms. I have always been partial to soft bottoms. Oops! Did I say that?
Yes you did!!

and yes a honest man

The time I ran aground (bumped) in Big Pass Sarasota ( ever-changing)

tough me several valuable lessons and I did have damage

but I was not going to let the lesson go to waste
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Old 08-11-2015, 06:36 PM   #20
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Was this just south of the jetty at Channel Islands Harbor?
Yes it was.
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