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Old 07-21-2012, 08:16 AM   #21
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Steve the OP concern about causing damage when going aground is a valid one with most trawler and motor boats of the size we discuss here on TF.
Having come from a sailboat my self and cruising the shallows of the west coast of Florida, I ran aground many times on my sailboat without worry. Just an inconvenience.

However with my planning hull motor boat, the props and rudder hang out like the family jewels and I'm in a different mind set now. I pay far more attention and so far that has paid off but for one soft grounding.
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Old 07-21-2012, 09:02 AM   #22
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Steve the OP concern about causing damage when going aground is a valid one with most trawler and motor boats of the size we discuss here on TF.
Having come from a sailboat my self and cruising the shallows of the west coast of Florida, I ran aground many times on my sailboat without worry. Just an inconvenience.

However with my planning hull motor boat, the props and rudder hang out like the family jewels and I'm in a different mind set now. I pay far more attention and so far that has paid off but for one soft grounding.
Us single engine guys aren't too concerned as long as there are no rocks/coral/sharp objects...which from North Jersey to Texas with the exception of extreme southern Florida is sand and mud.

My biggest concern would be to hit a sand ledge in such a way that as the tide goes ut the boat could roll to the point of flooding as the tide returned.
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Old 07-21-2012, 11:22 AM   #23
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Sailboats with twin keels are quite common in the UK. Not big sailboats, perhaps up to 30 feet or so. So when the tide goes out the boats sit on their keels like stands. These keels are permanent, not removable. Powerboats just lean over a bit.
That is what I plan on adding to the Eagle. Grounding ks not bad,negative if you plan for it. Grounding in same areas is a every day thing. I plan on grounding, beaching, being on a grid the Eagle. Shoot at -3ft tides the Eagle is a ground at the dock. If planmed for not a big deal.
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Old 07-22-2012, 03:07 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Phil Fill
If you boat enough its not a question if you will go aground but WHEN.


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I don't agree with that at all. I can't think of any boater I've met since we got our GB who's gone aground. I suspect the same is true for the vast majority of career captains and even most conscientious lifetime boaters.
Not so, Marin - maybe in your part of the world, but the saying quoted there by P/F is certainly true here in Moreton Bay, Queensland, and I doubt anyone who boats here would claim otherwise....
Not necessarily stuck fast until a tide change - usually one can back off at the speed one would be doing, but certainly I have kissed the bottom on an extra low tide here a number of times - less often now I know the Bay better, but I would never say it will never happen again....
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Old 07-22-2012, 11:16 AM   #25
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There's a clever invention that you folks in Australia might want to look into. It's been around in this country for a bit-- I think it was developed just prior to WWII using technology that had been evolving since the early 1900s-- and we named it sonar for SOund Navigation And Ranging.

While really expensive at first the technology has been steadily coming down in price until today you can get sonar units for wee boats like ours for a few hundred dollars.

It's a truly astonishing thing. It tells you exactly how far the seabed is from the underside of your hull even though you may not be able to see it looking over the side, and it's far more accurate and, more important, faster than the lead lines I assume you all are using down there currently. And today it's so precise it can measure and display depths that are only two or three feet greater than the depth of you keel. Amazing, really, when you think about it.

I have no idea if sonar, which tends to called a "depth finder" by the amateur boating crowd, has made it down your way yet. But since you all have the Internet now as evidenced by your post above, you might be able to order one on-line from outfits in this country like Defender, Fisheries Supply, West Marine and the like. What's cool is that today sonars can be powered by 12vdc so you don't have to deal with converting from 240vac 50hz to 120vac 60hz.

And even if your government's put the clamps on importing stuff directly from foreign internet retailers, I bet you can find some outfit down there who, if they don't actually have sonar units in stock, can get you one. They may have to launder the device's entry into Australia through another country-- perhaps New Zealand, Indonesia, or Malaysia-- but I'd be willing to bet you could get your hands on one if you asked the right people.

If you do, and if you install it properly on your boat, I suspect you'll find your constant groundings a thing of the past. I said earlier that none of the boaters I know personally have ever gone aground, and this includes some who have been boating for fifty years or so. But all their boats today have sonar, so I bet that's why.

Not long after we got our boat we took our first cruise into BC. We wanted to stay at a great marine park up there but for the life of us we couldn't figure out how to get into the anchorage. It was totally surrounded by very shallow water and even though we had guidebooks and charts we couldn't figure out the way in. We'd nose in toward the anchorage-- we could see boats there-- but every time we were defeated by the bar. But even though we were moving in until my wife on the bow could see the crabs running around in the eelgrass on the bottom we never once touched. Why? Because a previous owner of our boat had installed a sonar. So we could take the boat in until the sonar read three feet or so at which point we'd back away and try someplace else.

So check it out. I think it's a worthwhile addition to any boat.

PS- We have since been shown the way to get into the anchorage I mentioned above but even so we would never attempt it without having the sonar on.





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Old 07-22-2012, 02:18 PM   #26
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Cute...SONAR...who wuda thunk...

In defense of those on the other side of the coin..and maybe the world..

In my area of responsibility for assistance towing...the NJ Intracoastal is less than 3 feet deep in the middle of the channel in 2 locations at an average low tide.

There's no real info tell people about the hazard...even at high tide if you stray near the edge but are still in the marked channel you may go aground. Dozens of boaters ground in these areas weekly...even in little boats....fishfinders are of no help because often you go from the marked channel depth of 5-6 feet to 2 feet in less than a boat length.

Now before the lectures start on boating in such a place...I know...I know...but for many it is their home.
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Old 07-30-2012, 07:56 AM   #27
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Old 08-05-2012, 05:52 PM   #28
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I have one other circumstance to consider as it relates to grounding. We have had quite a few hurricanes move through our neck of the woods over the past twenty odd years. We have a canalfront home and as the storms approach nearly all the water blows/drains from the canal. This leaves our full keeled boats standing upright and lines taught we may lean on the docks at times but no bottom damage or gear damage. What happens when my new twin screw trawler tries to rest on the sandy bottom ? Will I be out there feverishly digging holes with my shovel to protect the props and rudders ? Can I use the propwash to blow out a few holes on the way down ? Of course when the storm passes we have had the water rush back in and submerge our docks by 3-4 feet. Oh the joys of coastal living...
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Old 08-05-2012, 06:49 PM   #29
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Greetings,
Get yourself a Dispro...(Disappearing Propeller Boat Company)

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Old 08-05-2012, 07:05 PM   #30
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Greetings,
Get yourself a Dispro...(Disappearing Propeller Boat Company)

What is that? A two cylinder motor and a two blade prop?

And unless there is something to close up that gap, it'd cause a lot of drag.

I know there is a punchline there somewhere, but I ain't going there.
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Old 08-05-2012, 07:27 PM   #31
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looks similar to designs I have for a retractable prop in St Pierre Dories out in the Canadien Maritimes.
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Old 08-05-2012, 07:41 PM   #32
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Depends upon the bottom. Here on the bay in the Panhandle of Florida we have muck and sand for a bottom. Easy to blow out a deeper area around the props by just running the props with the boat tied up.
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