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Old 09-12-2014, 03:12 PM   #141
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I don't think anyone mastered the ocean
Boy - is that ever the truth!

Maybe MasterMariner - but, OceanMaster is going pretty deep-down - pun intended!
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Old 09-12-2014, 03:50 PM   #142
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Lucky _______ would be appropriate
Lucky to GET to cross...????

or..... Lucky to get ACROSS...????
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Old 09-13-2014, 10:50 AM   #143
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Lucky _______ would be appropriate
Lucky my ass.

You make your own luck.
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Old 09-13-2014, 11:01 AM   #144
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How about the 50/50 award?
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Old 09-15-2014, 06:33 AM   #145
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Anyone who has done it might suggest "Sleep Deprived."
Excellent reading skills. I was wondering why no one else had caught that before. Not sure such antics should be rewarded.

The OP stated: single handed, across an ocean. This means at a minimum: operating with NO lookout, and not under command while underway.

Hardly worth glad handing over, in any fashion.

Of course, in theory......
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Old 09-15-2014, 11:33 AM   #146
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Revamped Dauntless Trophy design based on Richard's testimony. Please refrigerate if opened.
Actually mayonnaise doesn't grow mold or go bad if it isn't refigerated because it's alkaline. Nothing grows on alkaline base or in an alkaline environment. It has to be acidic for disease, mold, bacteria, virus or other nasty stuff to grow.

This is why Mayo is perfect on a boat.
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Old 09-15-2014, 01:27 PM   #147
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Actually mayonnaise doesn't grow mold or go bad if it isn't refigerated because it's alkaline. Nothing grows on alkaline base or in an alkaline environment. It has to be acidic for disease, mold, bacteria, virus or other nasty stuff to grow.

This is why Mayo is perfect on a boat.
Agreed!

Mayo if kept caped and clean and "In Dark Place" (light can ruin mayo - especially sunlight) then mayo needn't be refrigerated. However, It may gets "bugs" introduced to contents, by dirty utensils or other means... then crap can grow.
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Old 09-15-2014, 02:26 PM   #148
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Agreed!

Mayo if kept caped and clean and "In Dark Place" (light can ruin mayo - especially sunlight) then mayo needn't be refrigerated. However, It may gets "bugs" introduced to contents, by dirty utensils or other means... then crap can grow.
Don't double dip!!
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Old 09-15-2014, 02:32 PM   #149
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If anyone is truly interested in Mayo-there was an entire thread on CF some time back about whether Mayo needs to be refrigerated or not. I am a no refrigeration guy myself despite my mother's warnings about getting mayo on sandwiches from Delis or getting egg salad!
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Old 09-15-2014, 03:13 PM   #150
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Lucky to get ACROSS...
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Old 09-15-2014, 05:50 PM   #151
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Lucky to get ACROSS...
You mean.... Because I put my finger in a light socket (and survived) does not mean I am an electrician? Say It Ain't So, Joe.
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Old 09-15-2014, 06:34 PM   #152
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Lucky to get ACROSS...
When I retired from a career in flying, someone told me I was lucky I didn't crash in my 39 years and 15,000 flight hours of flight, much of it in high density areas at low altitude. This was from someone who doesn't fly and never will...knows nothing of the flight training, risk mitigation, mission preparation or crew concepts that made it possible to perform the duties confidently and safely. To him, I was lucky. To me, I was prepared and skilled. It all depends on your perspective and familiarity with the subject, I suppose.
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:08 PM   #153
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When I retired from a career in flying, someone told me I was lucky I didn't crash in my 39 years and 15,000 flight hours of flight, much of it in high density areas at low altitude. This was from someone who doesn't fly and never will...knows nothing of the flight training, risk mitigation, mission preparation or crew concepts that made it possible to perform the duties confidently and safely. To him, I was lucky. To me, I was prepared and skilled. It all depends on your perspective and familiarity with the subject, I suppose.
Biff Bam - Thank you Man! Well put. Hits the nail on the head!
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:44 PM   #154
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When I retired from a career in flying, someone told me I was lucky I didn't crash in my 39 years and 15,000 flight hours of flight, much of it in high density areas at low altitude. This was from someone who doesn't fly and never will...knows nothing of the flight training, risk mitigation, mission preparation or crew concepts that made it possible to perform the duties confidently and safely. To him, I was lucky. To me, I was prepared and skilled. It all depends on your perspective and familiarity with the subject, I suppose.
Heck, using your analogy, the guys who ROW across the Atlantic are Professionals too. Ummm. I don't think so. There is a difference between 'getting away with it' and being professional.

You put in best in your last sentence. "It is YOUR perspective and familiarity" However, too often confidence is not met with competence.

John John was supremely confident in his Saratoga. By accounts, he flew it into the Atlantic inverted, doing around 220 knots. Hardly competent. BUT, there are scads like him around (both in the air, and on the water) who are 'deemed' to be competent. But the reality is somewhat less than desirable.

Even the "Captain" of the HMS Bounty was considered competent by his peers. Look at the fine mess he put himself (and his crew) in!

You mentioned a lot of training, planning, and industry standard regulations that you follow to have a safe flight plan.

In the Marine industry NO ONE is excused from following the rules of prudent seamanship, and the Colregs. Sailing singlehanded for many days violates SO many rules, nevermind common sense. However this post cries out for 'special recognition' for someone who does exactly the wrong thing.

How about we nominate him for a 'Nobel Prize'? Seems you don't have to actually DO anything to get one of those anyway.

"There is some controversy about the legality of sailing single-handed over long distances. The International Maritime Organization navigation rules require that "Every vessel shall at all times maintain a proper look-out by sight and hearing as well as by all available means appropriate in the prevailing circumstances and conditions so as to make a full appraisal of the situation and of the risk of collision."[21] Single-handed sailors can only keep a sporadic lookout, due to the need to sleep, tend to navigation, etc., raising the possibility of a collision with an unseen vessel"
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Old 09-15-2014, 09:29 PM   #155
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Hits the nail on the head!
The only nail it hits is his own.
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Old 09-15-2014, 10:41 PM   #156
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Heck, using your analogy, the guys who ROW across the Atlantic are Professionals too. Ummm. I don't think so. There is a difference between 'getting away with it' and being professional.

You put in best in your last sentence. "It is YOUR perspective and familiarity" However, too often confidence is not met with competence.

John John was supremely confident in his Saratoga. By accounts, he flew it into the Atlantic inverted, doing around 220 knots. Hardly competent. BUT, there are scads like him around (both in the air, and on the water) who are 'deemed' to be competent. But the reality is somewhat less than desirable.

Even the "Captain" of the HMS Bounty was considered competent by his peers. Look at the fine mess he put himself (and his crew) in!

You mentioned a lot of training, planning, and industry standard regulations that you follow to have a safe flight plan.

In the Marine industry NO ONE is excused from following the rules of prudent seamanship, and the Colregs. Sailing singlehanded for many days violates SO many rules, nevermind common sense. However this post cries out for 'special recognition' for someone who does exactly the wrong thing.

How about we nominate him for a 'Nobel Prize'? Seems you don't have to actually DO anything to get one of those anyway.

"There is some controversy about the legality of sailing single-handed over long distances. The International Maritime Organization navigation rules require that "Every vessel shall at all times maintain a proper look-out by sight and hearing as well as by all available means appropriate in the prevailing circumstances and conditions so as to make a full appraisal of the situation and of the risk of collision."[21] Single-handed sailors can only keep a sporadic lookout, due to the need to sleep, tend to navigation, etc., raising the possibility of a collision with an unseen vessel"
You completely miss the point, but at the same time chose examples to support it. The issue here is being prepared for the curves that are thrown you. A lack or training and preparation and overconfidence in his abilities is what got John Kennedy killed. A lack of preparation and over-confidence/poor judgement of the Captain is what sunk the Bounty.

Not maintaining a watch? You ignore the electronic sentry equipment available to alert a crew to potential collision threats. They are used in aviation also to call a threat to the crew's attention. AIS is effective in identifying a threat and alerting the crew long before it becomes an issue. Granted, it does not alert for small non-AIS vessels and flotsam, but it's a significant improvement to the methods of long ago. Your interpretation of the rules is neither official or final. It's just your opinion.

I suppose there will always be nay-sayers and folks who, even though they have never done anything even close to the task, will criticize the achiever and the methods used to complete it successfully. I get it.
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Old 09-15-2014, 10:56 PM   #157
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I suppose there will always be nay-sayers and folks who, even though they have never done anything even close to the task, will criticize the achiever and the methods used to complete it successfully. I get it.
Well said!
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Old 09-15-2014, 11:58 PM   #158
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Even the "Captain" of the HMS Bounty was considered competent by his peers. Look at the fine mess he put himself (and his crew) in!
"
Actually, he was extremely competent. Certainly, Bligh was a better navigator than any captains today. He did after all navigate a 20 ft longboat through barely charted seas something like 4000 miles....
His people skills, OTOH, may be a debatable issue.
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Old 09-16-2014, 12:05 AM   #159
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Well said!

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Old 09-16-2014, 05:13 AM   #160
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Actually, he was extremely competent. Certainly, Bligh was a better navigator than any captains today. He did after all navigate a 20 ft longboat through barely charted seas something like 4000 miles....
His people skills, OTOH, may be a debatable issue.

I was not referring to the Master of the 'original' a Bounty. I was referring to to 'Captain' of the replica that sailed into hurricane Sandy and got himself killed along with a deckhand (amazingly enough) Who was a direct descendant of Fletcher Christian!
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