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Old 08-15-2014, 09:24 PM   #21
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I flip the dinghy with the 9.9 hp 4 stroke OB attached 90 degrees on the swim step with Weaver davits. I use the "arc" on the stern. I believe all 4 strokes will tip/transport on one side without problems. We've done this for over 24,000 cruising miles. We use a Dinghy-mate gas tank and can deploy it in less than a minutes, although it takes two minutes to secure it. It pulls up with a pulley from the boom. It's probably the ugliest way to carry a dinghy. And I have the boat name on the bottom of the dinghy so those considerate sport fishers can call me for a slow pass......
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Old 08-15-2014, 09:51 PM   #22
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Old 08-15-2014, 10:11 PM   #23
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I'd never store cans of gasoline in the bilge of my diesel boat. My 2-stroke engine, which runs from an external tank, is run dry (with the tank disconnected) before being hoisted aboard, wiped down and stored in the ER. There is absolutely zero chance of ignition without any gasoline in the engine.

Like PSN suggests, let's get realistic here! You can light a match all around my outboard after wipedown (maybe even before) and never cause an ignition. There's no way at all it can cause a problem in the ER.

I knew someone would jump on the issue here. When did you last try to get a water bottle past the TSA 'guards' to bring onboard? They won't allow that either. Of course they won't allow a gas combustion engine, or diesel for that matter, onboard. You can't even bring compressed air like a CO2 canister for a PFD on a plane.
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Old 08-16-2014, 02:19 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
I'd never store cans of gasoline in the bilge of my diesel boat. My 2-stroke engine, which runs from an external tank, is run dry (with the tank disconnected) before being hoisted aboard, wiped down and stored in the ER. There is absolutely zero chance of ignition without any gasoline in the engine.
Al, we may be at cross purposes. You are comfortable with an external tank engine run dry. My 6hp Tohatsu,(like many small o/bs), has an integral tank. Even run out of fuel, which it probably won`t be, there may be tank residue. It is not going in the ER. Some may disagree but it`s the conservative approach for me.
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Old 08-16-2014, 07:52 AM   #25
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I'd never store cans of gasoline in the bilge of my diesel boat. My 2-stroke engine, which runs from an external tank, is run dry (with the tank disconnected) before being hoisted aboard, wiped down and stored in the ER. There is absolutely zero chance of ignition without any gasoline in the engine.

Like PSN suggests, let's get realistic here! You can light a match all around my outboard after wipedown (maybe even before) and never cause an ignition. There's no way at all it can cause a problem in the ER.

I knew someone would jump on the issue here. When did you last try to get a water bottle past the TSA 'guards' to bring onboard? They won't allow that either. Of course they won't allow a gas combustion engine, or diesel for that matter, onboard. You can't even bring compressed air like a CO2 canister for a PFD on a plane.
This has nothing to do with the TSA so let's get realistic here.

If you are comfortable storing your gas dinghy motor in your engine room, go ahead and do this, don't listen to the warnings of people who are trying to keep you safe. The fact that it hasn't blown up yet is not proof that it won't in the future.

Many boaters own dinghy motors with built in fuel tanks and these can never be completely emptied of all gasoline or fumes, at least without a great deal of trouble. Others many not always get the last bit of gasoline out of their engines before storage even if they are using an external tank.

I don't think it's a good idea to recommend practices to others that may cause them harm.
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Old 08-16-2014, 08:03 AM   #26
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Outboard Carry Bags - Tough Duck Marine
The Tough Duck Outboard Carry Bag is great for...
Traveling:
Protect your outboard in your boat, trailer, camper, truck bed, airplane or any other type of transportation you may be using
Storage:
Give you motor the best protection possible while waiting for the next season to enjoy.
This carry bag encases the entire motor and will accommodate both 2 stroke and 4 stroke engines from 2hp to 15hp.
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Old 08-16-2014, 09:14 AM   #27
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I store my 3.3hp Johnson 2-stroke outboard vertically in the lazarette on a bracket I built for the purpose. I run the float chamber dry and pour the remaining fuel back into the can which lives in a small vented locker under one of the flybridge seats.

IMHO Psneeld and FlyWrght have the right approach.
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Old 08-16-2014, 12:04 PM   #28
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My bracket is located under the stairs leading to the flybridge. It's kind of a dead space on most sedan type boats.
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Old 08-16-2014, 12:54 PM   #29
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Shortly after hurricane Ktrina my wife was flying to visit relatives. Another passenger was trying to fly to the hurricane area to help with the cleanup. He wanted to take his chain saw with him. Even though he said he had drained the fuel tank and run it dry, the airline would not allow the chain saw on the plane. That's what I would want to hear if I was flying on that plane.
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This has nothing to do with the TSA so let's get realistic here.
You brought up trying to get a chain saw on an airline and it not being allowed. Who do you think makes and enforces those rules? The Easter Bunny?

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Al, we may be at cross purposes. You are comfortable with an external tank engine run dry. My 6hp Tohatsu,(like many small o/bs), has an integral tank. Even run out of fuel, which it probably won`t be, there may be tank residue. It is not going in the ER. Some may disagree but it`s the conservative approach for me.
I agree, Bruce. That's why my 2HP Honda OB with a built-in tank resides on the FB rail mount. There's a difference between the two engines. I won't place my Honda generator in the ER either. It lives on the FB under its own fabric cover and locked down.
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Old 08-16-2014, 12:59 PM   #30
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Another "what engine"? Our CLC Eastport Pram only has oars.
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Old 08-16-2014, 01:03 PM   #31
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My bracket is located under the stairs leading to the flybridge. It's kind of a dead space on most sedan type boats.
HS, does that interfere with your stbd aft door opening?

My early model, 1977 34 LRC seems to have a steeper ladder than later models which leaves me less space between the ladder and the door/wall. I think an external transom mount is in my future to avoid having to lift the motor over the aft rail. (no transom door on my boat.)
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Old 08-16-2014, 01:27 PM   #32
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I think there is theory and there is common sense. A small outboard that is run from an external tank and run dry after use is not going to have any fuel in it. Even our big 90 hp Yamaha, when run dry, has nothing in the three carburetor bowls when I remove the drain screws to make sure before putting the Arima away for the winter.

So while an outboard that does have some fuel in it would pose a hazard if stored in an engine room or any other enclosed space where sparks might be present in a pump motor or something, if the outboard doesn't have any fuel in it and has been wiped down to remove any fuel from the exterior-- which I would imagine would evaporate within minutes anyway--- to my way of thinking it's an inert object and poses no danger.
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Old 08-16-2014, 04:54 PM   #33
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Where do you stow your dinghy engine

We are fortunate enough to have the Weaver setup with the articulating motor mount. Our outboard runs on propane and stays on the bracket full time. We use as sunbrella cover when not in use.
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Old 08-16-2014, 05:34 PM   #34
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Our dingy and motor are on our swim grid via a SeaWise system......
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Old 08-16-2014, 06:08 PM   #35
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On the dinghy carried on Kato transom davits. the Monk has a bracket welded to the mast which works well too but I prefer to leave on the dinghy no pic now maybe in a few days.
When I had a Camano as shown below on the ladder to the FB.
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Old 08-16-2014, 06:21 PM   #36
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My engine is electric and weighs about 13 lbs. It fits neatly in the salon under the bench on the starboard side, alongside the group 24 battery that powers it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
I'd never store cans of gasoline in the bilge of my diesel boat. My 2-stroke engine, which runs from an external tank, is run dry (with the tank disconnected) before being hoisted aboard, wiped down and stored in the ER. There is absolutely zero chance of ignition without any gasoline in the engine.

Like PSN suggests, let's get realistic here! You can light a match all around my outboard after wipedown (maybe even before) and never cause an ignition. There's no way at all it can cause a problem in the ER.

I knew someone would jump on the issue here. When did you last try to get a water bottle past the TSA 'guards' to bring onboard? They won't allow that either. Of course they won't allow a gas combustion engine, or diesel for that matter, onboard. You can't even bring compressed air like a CO2 canister for a PFD on a plane.
Al, despite your engine being run dry, just curious as to how do you ensure there are no gasoline vapors in the carb and the fuel lines? Gasoline vapors have a tendency to lurk for a long time.

When I was considering purchasing a gasoline powered outboard, I called the CG station in Rio Vista and asked about the proper protocol for storing the engine in the bilge. They said it is technically acceptable if it is run dry, as you do for your outboard. However, they emphasized it is the least desirable storage option -- as there have been documented instances of fuel from the outboard posing an ignition risk in the bilge because it was either not fully drained (despite being run dry) or inadvertently spilled into the cowling during the fuel line disconnect and had dripped into the bilge. While unlikely or even next to impossible for the right conditions to be there to incite an explosion, it's enough to push me toward exploring alternatives. Just my two cents...
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Old 08-16-2014, 06:41 PM   #37
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If you plan to store your outboard in your bilge...take the proper precautions...if the carb bowl doesn't run dry drain it...if there is spillage in the cowl...air it out, if in the line to the tiny filter (which shouldn't have any if run dry just purge it.

This isn't really all that hard or dangerous. Even the fuel from the line attachment to the carb bowl isn't but a few ounces and by the time it runs down the side of your storage area and evaporates...keep your blowers running a few minutes.

I'll bet on most of the boas here...I can find as much explosive/flammable substances stored below decks with free drainage to the bilge.

While being careful is smart...then go though your boat and get out all the aerosol cans with flammable on them including any pam in the galley, after shave lotions, etc..etc...all of it can be a hazard if you look for gremlins under every hatch or locker cover.
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Old 08-16-2014, 07:28 PM   #38
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My dink will be stowed on Weaver snap davits, 4.5 HP motor in the cockpit.

Storing the separate gas tank presents a conundrum. I have 55 gallons of gasoline stored in the bilge already, may not have room for another 3 gallons.
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Old 08-16-2014, 07:35 PM   #39
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On the dingy. on the upper deck.
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Old 08-16-2014, 10:05 PM   #40
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Scott,
I always run my dink engine carb dry and store it in the hold. That's a 3' X 4' X 10' storage compartment under the salon floor in my Willard. It's as far down in the boat as you'll get w a small OB. Never smell gasoline. Not a concern. Actually the 2hp Yamaha 2 stroke has a fuel tank and it's not dry. The cap on top has a vent that shuts tight and of course there's a shutoff valve on the fuel line between the carb and tank.

I started doing this after carrying the Yamaha in the car many times and not ever smelling gas or seeing ant leaks.

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