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Old 02-16-2015, 12:20 PM   #41
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Light dinghy, heavy tow boat...nope...eye position won't matter a bit...

What will matter more is dingy fore/aft trim on a typical planing boat with motor up and whether towing stiff line or catenary.
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Old 02-17-2015, 06:53 PM   #42
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I just got off the phone with the manufacturer, Klamath Boats, and they said at our towing speeds there should not be any concern. He said just don't take off at full throttle and jerk it. I explained that our boat is a 7-8 knot boat wot and that is not an issue for us. I asked about rough conditions and he pretty much reiterated what you said psneeld, not an issue in 4-5 ft seas, just keep an eye for any signs of strain and if I wanted to do some overkill an easy solution would be to find an aluminum welder to beef up the eye and area around it. But he said he did not think it would be an issue. He also laughed and said don't turn it into a baggage boat and add all kinds of weight back there, let it tow in peace and you will love the boat.
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:29 PM   #43
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Quote:
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I just got off the phone with the manufacturer, Klamath Boats, and they said at our towing speeds there should not be any concern. He said just don't take off at full throttle and jerk it. I explained that our boat is a 7-8 knot boat wot and that is not an issue for us. I asked about rough conditions and he pretty much reiterated what you said psneeld, not an issue in 4-5 ft seas, just keep an eye for any signs of strain and if I wanted to do some overkill an easy solution would be to find an aluminum welder to beef up the eye and area around it. But he said he did not think it would be an issue. He also laughed and said don't turn it into a baggage boat and add all kinds of weight back there, let it tow in peace and you will love the boat.
just remember it's back there....sometimes easy to get distracted and forget now and then...
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Old 03-12-2015, 06:21 PM   #44
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I'm also looking for a "dinghy-fishing-exploring-work" boat. I may decide to tow some but haven't convinced myself I want to do it all the time. Maybe that's because i haven't towed before.

Except for the increased wind profile and the possibility of dinging up the big boat, any reason you couldn't carry the Klamath aluminum boat on the bridge deck if there is room?
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Old 03-12-2015, 10:20 PM   #45
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I would need a significantly larger boat to bring my 15' Klamath aboard. It weighs 615 lbs boat and motor. Not adding anything else. My boat could not carry it on the aft cabin for both length and weight reasons. But..... They do make a great 12 footer that is welded that weighs 144 lbs without a motor that would be a nice carry aboard dinghy to row or use a small outboard or even an electric trolling motor for shore excursions.
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Old 03-12-2015, 10:37 PM   #46
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Keith a 12' skiff is not a nice boat to row. Like rowing a barge and no directional stability. Better than a rubber duckie though.

I've seen small Lunds that were very light and 11 feet. I have an idea about a foldable marine railway (very lightweight) that would launch a 12' skiff straight over the aft cockpit. Probably one of those never get around to it ideas.
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Old 03-13-2015, 12:30 AM   #47
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Eric, rowing a rubber boat has only worked for me when I row one on a river to fish out of. From Montana to coastal rivers it can be a great fishing platform, but rowing one as a dinghy has not been anywhere near as pleasurable. Rowing a 12' Klamath was actually significantly better, smoother, faster and easier to control. It is definitely not a sleek stylish row like a wherry, but not bad at all. Just my experience though.
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Old 03-13-2015, 09:35 AM   #48
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Quote:
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just remember it's back there....sometimes easy to get distracted and forget now and then...
Good advice i have not always followed!

I now use an "automatic retrieval system" to bring in the towline when I slow down. The towline is retrieved enough so it clears the propellers but is loose enough so the dinghy does bang-up against the boat.

In Keith's GB Classic it could work as shown below.

The yellow line is the towline which can be on a bridle or directly attached.

The red line is a long bungee cord that is attached at a specific point along the towline, runs through a small pullley block at the end of the boom and is then attached to the mast. (To accommodate a longer bungee cord, a second pulley block could be placed at the mast end and bunge cord doubled back and attached to the end of the boom.)

My boat is an "Europa" style so I attach the pulley at the rear edge of the flying bridge and run the bungee cord along the edge of the flying bridge to make it longer.

Even though the Admiral continues to be designated dinghy watcher this system provides additional safety.
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Old 03-13-2015, 09:46 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
just remember it's back there....sometimes easy to get distracted and forget now and then...
Good advice i have not always followed!

I now use an "automatic retrieval system" to bring in the towline when I slow down. The towline is retrieved enough so it clears the propellers but is loose enough so the dinghy doesn't bang against the boat.

In Keith's GB Classic it could work as shown below.

The yellow line is the towline which can be on a bridle or directly attached.

The red line is a long bungee cord that is attached at a specific point along the towline, runs through a small pullley block at the end of the boom and is then attached to the mast. (To accommodate a longer bungee cord, a second pulley block could be placed at the mast end and bunge cord doubled back and attached to the end of the boom.)

My boat is an "Europa" style so I attach the pulley at the rear edge of the flying bridge and run the bungee cord along the edge of the flying bridge to make it longer.

Even though the Admiral continues to be designated dinghy watcher this system provides additional safety.

attachmentid=38202&stc=1&d=1426257996[/url]
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Old 03-13-2015, 09:48 AM   #50
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Xlantic, that is one I have not seen before. Interesting. Thanks for putting that graphic in to really see the setup. Not sure it will work for me as I tow the boat a bit further back. Have you ever had a bungee break on you doing this? I like the automatic retrieval part to avoid fouling the tow line. We've done that twice in our first cruiser but have managed to avoid it since.
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Old 03-13-2015, 09:53 AM   #51
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Not sure it will work for me as I tow the boat a bit further back.
Yes this system only works on a relatively short towline but I have found such towlines are fine.

Quote:
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Have you ever had a bungee break on you doing this?
No. If the bungee cord is long enough so that it is not overstretched it should not break. In my set-up it doesn't quite double in length when towing.
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Old 07-14-2016, 02:41 AM   #52
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Looking at a larger dinghy myself
Boat currently has a little 2.4m solid fiberglass inflatable look a like which is great if only going 100 ft to the shore but not enough for exploring.

Ideally i'd like at least a 12 to 14 ft V nosed aluminium punt but I also want to lift it out of the water at night to prevent theft and banging alongside and for lifting when coming into a fuel dock.
My davits are set up so I can lift up to the roof level

question: Is having a dinghy wider than the transom likely to be an issue?
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