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Old 10-18-2012, 04:29 AM   #21
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Thanks for the reply. I don't think my next purchase will be a RIB and I checked their site and really liked what I saw.
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Old 10-18-2012, 09:52 AM   #22
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Thanks for the reply. I don't think my next purchase will be a RIB and I checked their site and really liked what I saw.
The new ones built here in NC are very good as far as fit and finish. I bought one last year and could not get it to work on my swim platform so I sold it to Gonzo. He had a Weaver davit system already on his platform and I believe he is happy with the boat.
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Old 10-18-2012, 12:39 PM   #23
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We really like our Livingston and have non of the flaws mentioned. It fits well on our Weaver davits mounted on the swim platform. The Trawler Beach House: A New Dinghy And A Big Change . Chuck
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Old 10-18-2012, 01:25 PM   #24
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Livingstone was purchased by a Company in the Carolinas about 3-4 years ago, the manufacturing moved from the west coast to the new plant, my boat was built at that time so I'll blame the problems on that. I don't know if the flaws have been corrected I hope so because they perform well, maybe a recent purchaser can chime in.
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We bought our 9' Livingston in early 1999 so it was made here by the original company. The 9' boat has no seats per se, just molded in "platforms" in the bow and stern with a centerline "platform" connecting them. The interior of the boat is one big molded piece so there are no joints or seams to split or open up.

One thing we learned when we decided to buy one is that if a Livingston is going to be carried on its side on a swimstep in Weaver-type davits it must be the reinforced-side model. The reinforced side version has more layers of fiberglass in the sides. This prevents the side that's down from excessive bowing under the weight of the dinghy. Without this reinforcement the side will distort too much which can eventually cause structural problems. So said the dealer and Livingston, anyway.

At the time the company also made a "resort" version of most of their models. These had plywood reinforcement inside the sides. This was to make the boats very strong for the sort of service they might get at a fishing resort or whatever. However this also added weight to the boat and the dealer did not recommend this option for a swimstep-carried dinghy.

I have no idea if the current manufacturer has continued these options but if they have, anyone contemplating the purchase of a Livingston that's going to be carried on its side should make sure to get the reinforced-side model.

Another excellent option offered by the original company was stainless steel keel strips. On our rocky, gravelly shores, these do a great job of protecting the bottom of the boat.

Livingstons are butt-ugly but for a utility shoreboat they can't be beat. Amazingly stable, very simple, rugged construction (at least the originals), lots of interior room. The one drawback to them vs. an inflatable/RIB is that with a sizeable load there is very little freeboard, at least in the smaller models. So not the kind of boat you want to take into choppy water or out amongst boat wakes with a full load in it. I wish they'd have made the hull a few inches deeper on the 9' model. This is why when the time comes that we start taking more and longer trips north we'll replace the Livingston with a Bullfrog. But for now, as a shoreboat and calm water fishing/crabbing boat, the Livingston is ideal. Until the popularity of inflatables and RIBs took off, Livingstons were the dinghy of choice in this area and you still see a huge number of them about since they last pretty much forever.
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Old 10-18-2012, 08:35 PM   #25
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Livingston drains

The three pictures show
First looking from the bow aft, an indentation in the floor just before the "seats" or bench it appears to me that at one time there was a drain going under the seat at this point, you can see for some reason it was moved to a much higher point so water accumulates on the deck.
2nd.Aft view if the seat showing the spot where a drain might have been

3rd A view of the transom drain, the bottom of the drain is about an inch above the bottom of the drain channel so water accumulates there also.

There were also many pinholes in the seams of the seats and the deck.
the dinghy performs well, is stable and fast, I was disapointed with the faults I mentioned.
Steve W
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Old 10-18-2012, 08:44 PM   #26
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Our "original" Livingston has only two drains and they are simply small holes drilled in the bottom of the interior mold in front of the aft "platform," one at the back of each longitudinal "well." The water drains into the space between the interior mold and the hull mold.

The exterior drains are simple fittings in the transom at their lowest points behind each of the catamaran hulls with a screw-out plug. Pull the dinghy up on the beach, unscrew the plugs and that's it.
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Old 10-18-2012, 08:51 PM   #27
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Yes, I believe those drains were moved to the position you can see in my pixs and the area where a drain should be at the low point of the "well" is closed off. In my case I filled the "wells" with fiberglass.
Maybe Chuck or Gonzo can tell us what their configuration is?
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Old 10-18-2012, 09:41 PM   #28
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My 30ish year old 8 foot Livingston has no drain holes at all. Amazingly stable craft.
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Old 10-19-2012, 02:40 AM   #29
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My 30ish year old 8 foot Livingston has no drain holes at all. Amazingly stable craft.
Here is a pic of the anti theft device on my amazingly unstable 2 meter dinghy, light enough to lift on my own, kept chained up on the shoreline near our swing mooring. To discourage theft it has a simple plastic inspection port with screw in cap on the side of the hull. I keep the cap in my usual bag of stuff taken onboard, screw it in and remove later after use.
Fitting is easy, find a flat area, steel yourself to cut a hole with a jigsaw in you new dinghy, bed the base into the hole, drill fixing holes using the base as template, fit csk bolts no longer than necessary with nylon locknuts. The hull is not as flat as you think, tighten the bolts keeping the base flat,and squirt sealant into any gaps left between hull and base. If you flex the base unevenly the cap won`t screw in well. Use any sealant,remember you may have to remove the port to renew it.
Keen thieves may carry a plug ,most won`t and will ignore a dinghy with a 4 inch hole.
I`ve added a pic of storing the inflatable hanging from the garage ceiling using ratcheted tie down straps used to "tie up". Lower the dinghy onto the roof bars on the wagon. Storing it is the reverse,drive the car under the storage point,put the straps under the dinghy,hoist away. BruceK
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:06 PM   #30
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Here is what I wound up doing for storage on the dinghy, the space is 6" ID. X 10" deep, I scooped out that much foam from under the seat and put in a pipe with cap on inside and deck plate as you can see. It should make enough room for the few things I want to carry.
I'll try it a while, if it works out I might do the port side later on.
Steve W,
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Old 10-19-2012, 11:16 PM   #31
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Here is what I wound up doing for storage on the dinghy, the space is 6" ID. X 10" deep, I scooped out that much foam from under the seat and put in a pipe with cap on inside and deck plate as you can see. It should make enough room for the few things I want to carry.
I'll try it a while, if it works out I might do the port side later on.
Steve W,
Nice solution.
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Old 11-10-2012, 08:53 PM   #32
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I do like the style of the Livingston and it performs well with my 6 HP Mercury. Mine did have several manufacturing flaws, in the seams of the seat hull joints which has allowed water to accumulate under the seats which should have been water tight. The hull/transom drains are of a poor design which do not work well at all.
Livingstone was purchased by a Company in the Carolinas about 3-4 years ago, the manufacturing moved from the west coast to the new plant, my boat was built at that time so I'll blame the problems on that. I don't know if the flaws have been corrected I hope so because they perform well, maybe a recent purchaser can chime in.
Steve W
Hey Steve -Just to follow up. I have been studying the specs and really like the weight of the LV 9 at about 160#"s. Have you carried 4 adults in yours and if so did it handle it well? The LV 10 is 30 #"s more and if we purchase one it would be flipped up on Weavers. The additional weight would be a struggle.
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Old 11-10-2012, 09:29 PM   #33
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Steve, no we have never had more than the two of us on the dinghy. It performs well with our 6HP Mercury four stroke.
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Old 11-11-2012, 08:21 AM   #34
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secured to the dock with a padlock

Great at your OWN dock , but at a public dock using a long painter is required if as usual 30 dinks want to access a 12 ft dock.
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Old 11-11-2012, 09:18 AM   #35
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Here is what I wound up doing for storage on the dinghy, the space is 6" ID. X 10" deep, I scooped out that much foam from under the seat and put in a pipe with cap on inside and deck plate as you can see. It should make enough room for the few things I want to carry.
You can buy those pre-made but with a flexible bag, not a pipe.

http://www.defender.com/product.jsp?...48504&id=74866

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Old 11-11-2012, 10:00 AM   #36
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Steve, no we have never had more than the two of us on the dinghy. It performs well with our 6HP Mercury four stroke.
Steve
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Old 11-11-2012, 01:24 PM   #37
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The big drawback with a Livingston, at least the 9' model, is the lack of freeboard with a heavy load. We've had three adults and a medium size dog in ours on a couple of occasions and it looked like three adults and a dog sitting in a hole in the water. If there was more than a couple of inches of freeboard I would be surprised. It would be very easy to swamp the boat in that condition if a wake came along.

My one beef with Mr. Livingston or whoever designed the thing is that he didn't increase the freeboard by a foot.

There was a similarly designed, competing boat in the PNW for a number of years called the Sorensen. I still see one on occasion. I have no idea if they were good, bad, or indifferent in comparison to the Livingston but they have the freeboard the Livingston should have had.

But with any kind of a load a 9' Livingston is a calm water boat only in my opinion and experience.
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Old 11-11-2012, 05:11 PM   #38
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Thanks Marin. We often shuttle guests from the boat to the barrier islands on the Mississippi coast for swimming and need the ability to haul. Maybe the 10' should be considered? We can load our RIB Avon/WM up with 5-6 adults if necessary, but I am forever pumping it up or looking for a new hole. 100% FG sure sounds appealing!
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Old 11-11-2012, 05:25 PM   #39
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We can load our RIB Avon/WM up with 5-6 adults if necessary, but I am forever pumping it up or looking for a new hole. 100% FG sure sounds appealing!
Steve, RIBs like any other dinghy have their draw backs. If you plan for 2 people to be using the dinghy, almost all of them will work. For more than 2, a RIB can meet most of your requirements. My Caribe usually has air added about monthly unless there is a cold snap. Then it will need some air. A doubled hull with bow storage will solve a lot of your storage problems. It's hard to beat the comfort of sitting high and dry on the big 17' tubes. There is a little weight penalty, but properly balanced with a 15 hp engine, it should skim across the water. Since mine is stored horizontally, I cover the rear and sides with a standard cover that is just used in reverse for sun protection. We carry 4 adults often. Boat wakes and rough water is no problem as it floats like a cork. Just my 2 cents.
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Old 11-11-2012, 08:36 PM   #40
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Thanks Don. I rechecked the capacity of my rig and it is substantially more than the LV9. I'm beginning to think I will make a winter project out of repairing the small leaks and having the front Weaver Arc fabricated as you did. I have the rear arc but currently use the glue on pad for the front. And it creates its own set of problems when I too.
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